Rhythm inside: Loïc Nottet releases debut album “Selfocracy”

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In 2015 Loïc Nottet brought Belgium back to the Top 5 for the first time since 2003. Since then his star has only risen as he has gone on to win Danse Avec Les Stars, the French version of Dancing with the Stars, and watched his single “Million Eyes” smash the charts. Now, the long wait for Loïc’s debut album has come to the end with the release of “Selfocracy”. And it’s set to take him even higher.

Selfocracy — Loïc Nottet

“Selfocracy” features twelve tracks that are collectively contemplative and brooding. The title track introduces the album with a stirring monologue set over dark but stirring music. The album properly kicks off with “Mud Blood”, which is arguably the best track on the record. Despite the name, “Mud Blood” is not about Harry Potter — the lyrics are deep and set over a deep bass beat. Loïc sings about wanting “to be the selfish kings of a worthless empire” and escaping with drugs to “pretend that we enjoy the lives we’ve got”. It’s deep, y’all. The trend continues with “Team8” and “Dirty”.

The lead single “Million Eyes” kicks things back into gear. Having already been crowned Team Wiwi’s Top Track of 2016, “Million Eyes” carries the theme of the album superbly, as Loïc sings about the glare of the public eye. With lyrics as powerful as “different, too different, I’m scared of judgement”, it’s easy to see why this was our favourite track of the year.

The second half of the album has plenty of highlights of its own. The 6 minute and 39 second-long “Poison” is mandatory listening. Joined by rapper Shogun, Loïc delivers his signature brand of darkness. He sings about people talking and his conscience being poisoned. The lengthy instrumental conclusion captures his avant-garde spirit and is worth a listen.

“Hungry Heart” and “Wolves” add to the sombre nature of the album. It is difficult to find a weak link as each song stands on its own and they come together to form a perfect collection. This is emphasised in the final song “Mirror”, which features a compilation of some of the previous tracks on the album. It’s not an awkward copy-paste of the previous songs, it’s a perfect amalgamation that shows off the album’s cohesion.

Score: 10/10

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