Lithuania, Evelina Sashenko ELIMINATED

Following our re-cap of the jury-televoter split in the Eurovision 2011 final, Wiwi and Vebooboo are back with a breakdown of the first semi-final results.

Highlights:

  • Lithuania’s Evelina Sashenko was the surprise winner of the jury vote. She edged out Azerbaijan’s Ell & Nikki by just four points.
  • Perhaps owing to its impressive stage show, televoters handed top marks to Greece’s Loukas Yiorkas. Azerbaijan once again finished second (by a margin of 30 points).
  • San Marino’s Senit—the bookies’ favorite to finish last in this semi-final—place an impressive eighth with the jury. She did, however, finish last in the televote.
  • If the jury had its way, then Malta’s Glen Vella and San Marino would have made the finals, and Georgia and Russia would have been sent home.
  • The biggest discrepancy of this semi-final occurred with Greece. The jury gave him 80 fewer points than televoters did.
  • San Marino accounts for the second biggest discrepancy. The jury gave Senit 66 more points than televoters did.
  • If televoters had their way, then Armenia, Norway and Turkey would have made the final. Lithuania, Switzerland and Serbia would not have advanced.

In case you forgot, this is what the combined results looked like:

  1. Greece (133)
  2. Azerbaijan (122)
  3. Finland (103)
  4. Iceland (100)
  5. Lithuania (81)
  6. Georgia (74)
  7. Hungary (72)
  8. Serbia (67)
  9. Russia (64)
  10. Switzerland (55)
  11. Malta (54)
  12. Armenia (54)
  13. Turkey (47)
  14. Albania (47)
  15. Croatia (41)
  16. San Marino (34)
  17. Norway (30)
  18. Portugal (22)
  19. Poland (18)

To determine who the jury helped the most, we subtracted televoting points from jury points (jury points – televoting points). A positive number means the jury helped a contestant. A negative number means that they hurt them.

Now review the results of the second semi-final and the grand final.

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Chris Painter
Guest

It is expected from jury to be familiar with songs that already existed before ESC contest so that any copy should be rated lower than normally expected. Meanwhile e.g. song from Switzerland (that had exactly the same refrain as Colby Caillat’s well known song Bubbly) was ranked higher than the song from Hungary which had the highest ratio of like to dislike on You Tube. This is ridiculous and shows that jury appeared to be less profesional that the average voter. Similarly jury pretended to be blind in the case of the song from Denmark which had copied refrain as… Read more »

Chris Painter
Guest

It is really hard to believe that jury gave so little points for Hungary and Poland. These two songs were among those with the highest ratio of like to dislike at a very large number of entries. Hungary had absolutely the highest like to dislike ratio of all songs in ECS so I expected that jury would place it definitely first in this semifinal and close to the top in the final. Meanwhile the jury placed it so low. I see more tactics and politics than honest evaluation. Still unexplained why Turkey did not receive better score from tele-voting than… Read more »

Chris Painter
Guest

It is really hard to believe that jury gave so litle points for Hungary and Poland. These two songs were among those with the highest ratio of like to dislike at a very large number of entries. Hungary had absolutely the highest like to dislike ratio of all songs in ECS so I expected that jury would place it definitely first in this semifinal and close to the top in the final. Meanwhile the jury placed it so low. I see more tactics and politics than honest evaluation. Still unexplained why Turkey did not receive better score from televoting than… Read more »