The song might be dance, but the video is all urban y’all! A piano introduction leaves you thinking Cascada might have decided on stripping it all back and letting Natalie’s voice carry the song for a change. Don’t be ridiculous though – this is Cascada fronted by darling dance diva Natalie Horler! Cascada’s usual thumping blitzkrieg beat charges in soon after the opening bars and ‘The World Is In My Hands’ starts sounding neatly in sync with the Cascada back catalogue. Nat’s determined on taking us all back to 2004 with a particularly…lovely metallic scarf and one of her increasingly trademark corsets.

Girl’s shimmying is on point as it was in Malmö, swaying from side-to-side like no other, leaning her head to the left masterfully and flexing her right hand by her head like her life depends upon it. “So give me one more dance, it’s not too late. The world is in my hands,” she pleads but Nat’ honey you don’t need to get on your hands and knees: we’re just happy to see you’ve bounced back from bombing in Malmö! The ‘Glorious’-echoing soaring vocal and faint calypso tinges are a match made in heaven. As far as Cascada are concerned their time in the charts isn’t done, and with this song behind them even I’m having second thoughts about them being washed up after Malmö.

What do you all think? Is the world in Cascada’s hands or do they need to get a grasp on reality first?

Angus Quinn contributed this report from the U.K. You can follow him on Twitter at @Angus_Quinn17. Then like our Facebook page to keep up-to-date with all the latest news and gossip.
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Anthony Ko
Editor

@Jordan

Yes I know, I’m already aware that Cascada’s Natalie Horler can sing live, she’s a pro and spent years doing just that. I was referring to the pressure getting the better of her, or maybe the fact that she told her fans (me included) on Facebook saying that she may not be at her best vocally days before the Grand Final.

Jordan
Guest
Jordan

@Anthony

Cascada CAN sing…

Jordan
Guest
Jordan

@Anthony

Cascada CAN sing….

Anthony Ko
Editor

@Jordan,

Anouk is one of the Netherlands’s biggest current chart acts and she went on to achieve the country’s best Eurovision result since 2004. So if a country is going to send a big name chart act, just make sure that singer can sing live and doesn’t buckle under pressure.

Jordan
Guest
Jordan

@CookyMonzta After what happened this year, I don’t think the contest deserves to have well-established artists/groups grace the stage… Cascada’s downfall this year just proves that the contest isn’t ready. Yes, Cascada’s stage performance was weak and could have been improved. Yes, Cascada’s vocals didn’t appear that good on TV when in fact she sounded great in the arena. However, those two issues weren’t enough to knock Germany down to such a low result. The audience gave Germany the biggest ovation from the audience than they gave anyone else that night. Germany came 4th with 195 points in the OGAE… Read more »

CookyMonzta
Guest
CookyMonzta

@Anthony: Point taken. Having said that, I think Cascada may have started something that probably won’t stop for quite a while (assuming they were the first); that is, dance deejays sending material with feature vocalists to compete in their national contests in an attempt to qualify for ESC. A piece of me thinks Armin might not have been so easily tempted to even consider a quest for ESC 2014, had Yanou and Manian (both of whom are deejays) not qualified for the 2013 show. If supreme legends like Armin and Oakey send material to this contest and do well, other… Read more »

Anthony Ko
Editor

@CookyMonzta: In the end, it’s mainly about the song and the singer. Providing Paul Oakenfold doesn’t go on to produce an outdated entry (Pete Waterman in 2010 springs to mind), then the attention would still be focused on the vocalist. It was the case with Jade Ewen in 2009 and her 5th place achievement was made possible by a world famous composer that is Andrew Lloyd Webber.

CookyMonzta
Guest
CookyMonzta

@Anthony: Which brings me to a question that might be somewhat of a paradox: Should Paul Oakenfold put his cards on the table for the U.K. at ESC 2014, with an up-and-coming lead vocalist or someone who has been around for a while but whose reputation hasn’t reached megastar status? Or do some people consider him to be past his prime, despite whoever is his lead vocalist? I ask this question because people are clamoring for Armin to get in the game for the Dutch, with perhaps Sharon Doorson or Sharon den Adel as his lead. If Oakey says yes… Read more »

Anthony Ko
Editor

@CookyMonzta: With 5 Eurovision titles and 15 runner-up years, the UK’s certainly one of the most successful countries in the history of the competition. They reason they’ve been less successful over the past few years is because they tend to send ropey songs by people nobody has heard of. Or stars that are way past their prime and those trying to resurrect their music careers. What the UK needs is something modern and contemporary, something which wouldn’t sound out of place in the charts right now. Along with an act with talent who can sing well live, whether it’s a… Read more »

CookyMonzta
Guest
CookyMonzta

@Anthony: I gather that the U.K. music industry takes their reputation and prestige far more seriously. Given their recent failures, and the spectacle that was Jemini, they are far less likely to send their biggest stars of today. Whether they are afraid that the entry will royally screw up somehow, or that jealousy from other countries will cost them points, is anyone’s guess. In any case, I doubt that any record label will allow their big-time artist to even entertain the thought of entering the ESC, lest they risk finishing outside the top 10 or worse, in the bottom-third. They… Read more »

CookyMonzta
Guest
CookyMonzta

@Jordan: You misunderstood my point regarding the controversy surrounding “Glorious”. It is their long history of remakes (which include 2 of their 3 biggest hits ever; the partial remake “Everytime We Touch” and “What Hurts The Most”) which drove, if not fed, the perception in the minds of many that the arrangement of this song (or some of the elements within) was somehow deliberate. The perception was strong enough to launch an inquiry, which even I thought was ridiculous, but people’s perceptions are very hard to overcome or break, and that is when bullshit starts running wild. [By the way,… Read more »

DEX
Guest
DEX

Nevena from Serbia and Cascada it would be a lovely duet,why not!

Anthony Ko
Editor

I pretty agree with everything Jordan has mentioned.

All these comparisons between Glorious and Euphoria is like the Sun and the Daily Star newspapers fighting each other over a certain you-know-what page.

And the whole idea of Cascada’s music career going kaput because of Eurovision failure is the exact reason why the UK couldn’t send their biggest stars to Eurovision. Hence the BBC ends constantly have to rely on the unknowns and has-beens trying to resurrect their music careers.

Jordan
Guest
Jordan

@ CookyMonzta First – The comparisons to ”Euphoria” are the biggest load of bullshit I’ve heard all year. The two songs share a common genre, and a line – yes, a single line – where any rhythmic or melodic similarities are evident. And even that “eu-phooooooo-ria”/”gloooooo-rious” comparison falls down as these notes occur at different stages within the rhythm of the song, with Loreen beginning on an anacrusis and Natalie commencing the note a whole bar later. ”Euphoria” is predominantly minor. “Glorious” is major. The beat and bassline of each song is formed from its own distinct motifs, and the… Read more »

Tiggeh
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Tiggeh

this would have been a better entry for Germany.

Alex
Guest
Alex

Also, sorry for my earlier comment, I was being rather rude now that I look back at it!

The song is pretty nice, as expected. Definitely one of the best post-contest single releases from a Eurovision artist this year. This reminds me of Eiffel 65’s style of melodies from their Europop album, which is a very good thing.

Alex
Guest
Alex

In all seriousness, though, Youtube comments don’t really decide single sales or popularity. Occasional news articles with a lot of hyperbole don’t do that either. It’s really by and large the songs themselves, and that’s what Cascada has succeeded at doing for the past decade or so, even if many of their hits are covers. Though people were bitching about Glorious for a few months, honestly hardly anyone brought up this controversy after the contest. Besides, think about Chris Brown’s controversy, which was far more severe. If he of all people can continue a successful career, then it’s pretty obvious… Read more »

alex
Guest
alex

Lovely eurodance song but it won’t do anything on charts. I’m afraid their time has passed and i’m very sad about that.

Alex
Guest
Alex

That’s a good story. Feel free to make up another one.

CookyMonzta
Guest
CookyMonzta

And yet, the controversy and uproar over “Glorious” continued to fester throughout the winter and spring, not necessarily because of the song itself, or whatever perceived likenesses it had to Loreen’s “Euphoria” or the Swedish House Mafia’s “Don’t You Worry, Child”; but because their catalog is full of remakes. Once someone raised a red flag over “Glorious”, it became impossible for them to bury the controversy, because the river of remakes in their history gave the people the perception that they must rely on remakes to make a hit, with the obvious exception of “Evacuate The Dancefloor”.

Alex
Guest
Alex

…reality being that Cascada has always been capable of charting all over the world and will continue to do so. It’s not as though people are going to think “oh, they got a low placing in Eurovision, so I won’t buy their single.”

CookyMonzta
Guest
CookyMonzta

I’m sorry, but reality wins.