“Réalta na Mara” – Ireland’s first ever Junior Eurovision entry – has quickly become a fan favourite. But up to now, only Irish speakers understood what Aimee Banks was actually singing. Well, no more! Earlier today, an English version of the song was uploaded to YouTube, meaning the everyone can live Aimee’s inspiring message.

Through images of stormy seas and starry skies, it tells the universal story of how life can be rough, but there’s always hope. While not as mystical as the original, it acts as a nice companion piece, making the whole package much more accessible to the masses. What do you think? Listen to the English translation and let us know below.

Aimee Banks “Réalta Na Mara” – English Version

Ireland first rehearsal @ Junior Eurovision 2015

Ireland had its first ever Junior Eurovision rehearsal today. Here’s what we thought.

Our first impression: “…she’s keen to get back to her beloved: ‘Somewhere someday, across the wide open blue, through a strong gail, we set sail, warry me away back to you…’ And she takes us there. The waves become less ominous as the song goes on, and the white sail becomes a symbol of hope that she just might make it home (wherever that is).”

Fan Message from Aimee Banks

Interview with Aimee Banks @ Junior Eurovision 2015

FOLLOW ALL OF OUR JUNIOR EUROVISION COVERAGE HERE

Photo: EBU (Elena Volotova & Vladimir Dudakliev)

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Erin
Erin
4 years ago

-OFF TOPIC- THE AUSSIES ARE BACK FOR GOOD AS PLANNED-
https://www.eurovision.tv/page/news?id=173093

Erin
Erin
4 years ago

The English version is just as captivating as the Gaelic one, but Gaelic adds a dimension of mystery and echoes from a glorious past. To be honest, this song is an example of how music can conjure up imagery that transcends the language barrier to a point where you could feel its poetic pulse.

YoungsterJoey
YoungsterJoey
4 years ago

I like the English version, but obviously the Gaelic version brings a bit more “majestic.”

Foxreyna
Foxreyna
4 years ago

@Robyn the rule is that adult songwriters can write the song, but the child must do at least 2 verses of the song.

Robyn Gallagher
Admin
4 years ago

Jonas: The rule used to be that JESC songs had to be written by kids, but they changed it so that adults were allowed to help out. I *think* it was realised that there weren’t many kid songwriters who could actually write an amazing song on their own.

Jonas
Jonas
4 years ago

If adults are allowed to write the songs, what is the point of the Junior Eurovision?