Photo: Andres Putting (EBU)

They are one of four countries that is returning to a national final to select their act for Eurovision 2018. Now Montenegro‘s broadcaster RTCG has opened entry submissions for the relaunched Montevizija 2018. And they’re accepting entries from songwriters of any nationality.

The broadcaster has published the rules for the new national final. It’s brief, but it outlines the requirements for entry.

Montenegro — one of the smallest countries in Europe — is casting the net wide. The national final is open to songwriters from any country. However, some form of local cooperation will be needed — the rules also require that songs are written in the official language of Montenegro. That means lyrics will either have to be written in or translated to Montenegrin. It’s not clear if this also includes the other officially used languages, Serbian, Bosnian, Albanian or Croatian.

Artists can also submit up to two songs. It’s not clear if it’s possible for both songs to end up in the national final. As we saw with Germany’s 2017 national final, this isn’t always a good idea.

The rules also say that RTCG is looking for “fun and popular music”. They apparently haven’t been swayed by Salvador Sobral’s rant against “fastfood music”.

Song submission is being done anonymously. The selection committee will listen to the entries without knowing who is behind them. They’ll only learn who is behind the songs once the long list has been decided.

The five-member committee will rate the songs on three criteria: composition (up to 50 points), lyrics (up to 30 points) and production potential (up to 20 points). This adds up to a maximum of 100 points. From this, five entries will be selected for the grand final of Montevizija 2018, scheduled to take place on February 17, 2018.

Entries for Montevizija 2018 opened today and will close on 15 December 2018.

What do you think? Can Montevizija select a winning song for Montenegro? Who should represent Montenegro in Lisbon? Tell us what you reckon.

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Azaad
Azaad
3 years ago

On the language issue- Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian and Montenegrin are dialects of Serbo-Croatian, rather than individual languages necessarily. Of course, historical, geographic, political and religious factors have caused differences between the dialects (Bosnian has more Turkish and Arabic loanwords that the other three don’t because the country has greater ties to Islam, for example). But on the whole, the dialects are still mutually intelligible to a higher degree than other neighbouring countries (like Swedish, Norwegian and Danish, even), to the point where they could be considered dialects rather than separate languages. This is probably part of why “Balkan ballads”, which… Read more »

SomeFanOutThere
SomeFanOutThere
3 years ago

Vasilije will go for it, I bet

CookyMonzta
CookyMonzta
3 years ago

Not if either Sergej Cetkovic or Knez tries again.

Ktia
Ktia
3 years ago

Mark my words : next year will be a mess. Those balkan countries were at war with each other, but now they want each other languages only to avoid english. Just because Portugal did it. Maybe in the end they will revamp in english like Albania and will be a disaster. At this point I think Russia can win, but not with Julia.

Esc Fan
Esc Fan
3 years ago
Reply to  Ktia

First of all, the language which was spoken in former Yugoslavia was Serbo-Croatian. Serbian and Croatian are almost the same language, Bosnian and Montenegrin are de facto Serbo-Croatian. So I don’t see a problem why should that be a mess? In 2012 all ex Yugoslav countries sang in their own language. Was that a mess?

James
James
3 years ago
Reply to  Ktia

The languages in the former Yugoslav nations are all from the same language family with varying degrees of mutual intelligibility, except for Albanian, which is a language isolate.

And it’s not like Serbia, and Montenegro have always only sent English entries since their debut.

Jo
Jo
3 years ago
Reply to  Ktia

I guess this is just a typical comment to support the Anglovision.
War? Don’t they have joint versions of X-Factor, The Voice, and other Tv shows? X Factor Adria, for example. I think a singer famous in Serbia is probably famous in Macedonia and Montenegro as well. And they have done it in the past btw.

Paul D.
Paul D.
3 years ago

Don’t they have their own language tho?

Erasmus
Erasmus
3 years ago
Reply to  Paul D.

It’s pretty much the same as Serbian.

AngieP
AngieP
3 years ago
Reply to  Paul D.

I thought Serbia and Montenegro share the same language.
But didn’t all the ex Yugoslav countries speak more or less the same language?

Esc Fan
Esc Fan
3 years ago

So Montenegro will also sing in Serbian! I love how they go back to the roots, and I hope to see them in th final again.
If Croatia also sings in Croatian, all Balkan countries would have songs in their native language. Wouldn’t that be wonderful?

Denis
Denis
3 years ago
Reply to  Esc Fan

No, not really!

Denis
Denis
3 years ago
Reply to  Denis

Do you have an issue with me or something? Is there a reason for being so hostile when people post opinions? And who are you calling retard? I sure didn’t call anyone retard. All I said was no! How you turned that into me saying everyone is retard is perplexing. You seem to suffer from reading comprehension difficulties.
Perhaps you Balkan people need to chill and stop being so triggered over nonsense!

AngieP
AngieP
3 years ago
Reply to  Esc Fan

It will be great if all balkan countries sing in their native language. I’ve always loved these songs in the past.
And another NF! Bring out the calendars now!