Eilat, Haifa, Jerusalem and Tel Aviv all want to serve as host city for Eurovision 2019. But now that Israeli broadcaster KAN has published the official criteria for hosting, it’s clear that we can scratch the first two cities off the list.

Yes, after weeks of chatter and endless debate, it seems Eurovision is heading to Tel Aviv — a hub of technology and Israel’s Eurovision community — or Jerusalem — the centre of Israel’s Orthodox community and one of the most historically significant cities in the world.

Eurovision 2019 Host City: The criteria

As reported by MAKO, KAN expects the host city to meet the following criteria (among other things):

  1. It must have a fully covered hall or arena that can accommodate between 8,000 and 12,000 spectators. Those numbers include both seats and standing positions.
  2. A press centre must be located nearby to accommodate around 1,500 journalists.
  3. Cities must have at least 3,000 hotel rooms.
  4. Host venue must be available between March and May 2019 for set-up and rehearsals.

KAN stressed its preference for arenas that are already meet requirements. On the surface that would eliminate Eilat — its arenas are too small — and Haifa. The latter’s Sammy Ofer Stadium has 30,000 seats, but it lacks a roof. Installing one would be both time-consuming and expensive.

Jerusalem

It’s one of the most historic cities in the world and holds immense significance for Christians, Jews and Muslims. And while its international status is disputed and highly controversial, all sides agree it’s home to some of the most important buildings and religious sites in the world.

And it has plenty of experience hosting Eurovision. The International Convention Center, which hosted Eurovision in both 1979 and 1999, is considered too small for Eurovision 2019. It has a capacity of just 3,100, which wouldn’t work with the new super-sized Eurovision, which includes two semi-finals, a grand final, and, more typically, tens of thousands of audience members. Teddy Soccer Stadium, which has 31,000 seats, does not have a roof.

That leaves us with Jerusalem Pais Arena, which does meet the requirements. The multi-purpose sports hall has a roof and can house nearly 16,000 for concerts.

There is one major strike against Jerusalem: questions over whether it can honour commitments to the weekend rehearsals and jury show, which would violate the Sabbath.

As we previously reported, Orthodox religious leaders have demanded that Eurovision not desecrate the Sabbath, which takes place from sundown on Friday evening (just before the jury final would start) and ends on Saturday evening.

Those tensions could tilt the balance away from the city and toward Tel Aviv.

Today Mako suggested as much in its article entitle, “Will the Sabbath lead the Eurovision Song Contest to Tel Aviv?”

It wrote: “Due to the expected opposition of Haredi parties to the competition in Jerusalem due to desecration of the Sabbath, this demand will eventually lead to the selection of Tel Aviv as the host of the competition.”

Tel Aviv

Israel’s second most populous city boasts a stunning Mediterranean coastline and attracts more than 2.5 million international travellers every year. They stay at hotels at every price point — from hostels to über luxe — and enjoy some of the wildest nightlife in all of the Middle East. We’re huge fans of the city and have attended the last three editions of Israel Calling.

Bloomfield Stadium is a 14,000-capacity football venue currently undergoing renovations that will raise its capacity to 29,000. It’s scheduled for completion in 2019, but would need a roof. That rules it out.

However, Tel Aviv has two other options: The Menora Mivtachim Arena, which is used primarily for basketball, can host around 11,000 for sporting events, and Pavillon 2 at The Tel Aviv Convention Center, which can hold around 10,000.

As we previously reported, officials within the Finance Ministry have told reporters that the Pavillon is the most economically viable option. And Tamir Dayan, CEO of the convention centre, has been positioning the venue as a potential host for weeks. She told Haaretz: “If it is decided that Eurovision will not take place in Jerusalem, we will be happy to host it.”

The Tel Aviv mayor also seems hungry to secure the bid. He said: “Tel Aviv is suitable both in terms of infrastructure, and in terms of absorption of guests and the possibilities offered to them and in terms of being the cultural city center of Israel” .

35
Leave a Reply

avatar
11 Comment threads
24 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
18 Comment authors
Loin diciAnajdplattRomansrulik Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
jdplatt
Guest
jdplatt

TEL AVIV <3

Loin dici
Guest
Loin dici

Tel Aviv is undoubtedly the safest choice possible, tired hearing about the troubles to face in Jerusalem. About Pavilion 2, is there any possibility to make the stage smaller than Kiev or Vienna?

Ana
Guest
Ana

There is possibility to make a meter on meter stage, the question is who wants that?

Loin dici
Guest
Loin dici

Is ‘meter on meter’ the usual rectangular stage that concerts have? With the limitation of space, it would be better if smaller than 350 m2, and the meter-on-meter can probably be designed in the manner of JESC 2016/2017. Do you think this is possible?

Ana
Guest
Ana

I made another calculation for the Pais Arena in Jerusalem. In Eurovision format, with a stage of 350 sq m, 7 camera points (4 sq m each) and some backstage space we get a field space of 2274 sq m. Also i made a reduction of 3rd of the tribunes capacity for the stage. I got the number 9965. So Pais Arena is closer to 10K capacity which is actually not surprising, that would be a great venue, the problem is it’s in Jerusalem and this Shabbat thing will kill their chances. I didn’t put the green room in the… Read more »

srulik
Guest
srulik

guys. pav 2 could fill more if the stage is designed correctly. do not rule out Menorah Mivtahim stadium just yet as it is also large enough. the plus with pav 2 is that it is inside the convention cnter and has many other builldings around it which can accomodate the press center and the green room if need be. i am sure the city will have places tofor the public to watch the show alongside the eurovilage.
Jerusalm is out as the eurovilage itself is against sabath rules and besides, the city is not very gay friendly.

Ana
Guest
Ana

Menorah capacity in a concert with a lot smaller stage is 8K (Static and Ben El concert), meaning with a big stage, cameras, commentator booths and a control room, it will go way under that number (it’s not a balloon, there’s no more space than there is). The field there is tiny, this place looks crowded even in basketball games.

Ana
Guest
Ana

It will be pavillion no2. I played a little with their sketches showing the different tribune configuration, calculating how many people would be able to be there while there are 7 camera points on the floor (like previous years) and a 350 square m. Stage (like Kiev 2017) plus some backstage space. It shows that 8k should not be a problem, maybe even 9k. The green room will have to be outside the hall. BTW, i thought there were 11k in Kiev, but the floor plans that I found show there were 8k people in the arena. So this number… Read more »

Eastman
Guest
Eastman

The backstage area doesn’t even have to be part of the existing buildings. As we keep seeing in previous years, if a building doesn’t exist, a temporary one can be erected (press centre and artist spaces 2015, Euroclub 2016, press conference centre 2018).

Ana
Guest
Ana

I mean, i left a 5m gap between the stage to the wall. Seems like a minimal space so people can move there. The space is very limited there. They will have to think about every square meter, it is a true challange. But it is possible and it will look great if they use a smart and creative team.

Pancake
Guest
Pancake

Putting a roof at Sammy Ofer Stadium will just take a week, it’s not that time-consuming. Anyway, we all know the most viable option there is Haifa.

Alex
Guest
Alex

Haifa doesn’t have enough hotel rooms. It’s likely Game Over.

Jo.
Guest
Jo.

I’d take way more than just a week. It’s not like putting a lid.

Danny
Guest
Danny

A week? I guess you’re an engineer, LOL

Joe
Guest
Joe

Here’s hoping! My grandma said the whole family’s coming for the 2019 contest if it’s in Tel Aviv.

Arel Simha
Guest
Arel Simha

You know that if this in Tel Aviv you stay without tickets? The capacity in the venue only 6000(if you include green room and the stage), actually zero chance the Eurovision will take place in Tel Aviv so keep dreaming

Joe
Guest
Joe

You’d rather deal with boycotts? Better city, good venue.

Alex
Guest
Alex

oh please Arel

Loin dici
Guest
Loin dici

With a limited capacity, the green room can probably be moved to another place, like Malmö 2013 or Dusseldorf 2011.

Ana
Guest
Ana

Do you think in the Altice Arena everybody that wanted a ticket got one? So yeah there were 11.5K tickets and not 8K but still a lot more people wanted tickets. So unless a country provide 30-40K venue like Dusseldorf, the ticket problem will remain, it’s not only this year’s issue.

Jo.
Guest
Jo.

Well, if 8000 is allowed, then Tel-Aviv 2019 is happening.

David
Guest
David

Is there some way the arena in Tel Aviv can be expanded? Then it would be perfect.

Gobio
Guest
Gobio

It probably will be expended to around 10k.

Danny
Guest
Danny

No, it can host 8K without expansion so they won’t bother to do all the work for a couple of thousands.

Philip
Guest
Philip

It is really small omg :(((

Simi Riger
Guest
Simi Riger

Shoe Box Venue, Tel Aviv a long time out of the race
http://i68.tinypic.com/2vbafiu.jpg

Loin dici
Guest
Loin dici

Well it’s not really JESC, but that’s okay if 8000 is allowed.

Eastman
Guest
Eastman

Kiev 2017 showed us that a tiny venue can look big on TV. They can host an arena screening for fans who want the live atmosphere, like Tele2 in Stockholm 2016.

Kris
Guest
Kris

The arena in Kiev was bigger than this one though and had a capacity of 11k from what I remember

Don’t know why , but for some random reasoning I want Haifa to host….lol

Danny
Guest
Danny

The arena in Kiev was bigger but had a capacity of 8k due to a large green room that was inside the hall.
https://eurovisionworld.com/esc/kyiv-2017-floor-plan-inside-the-arena

Roman
Guest
Roman

That floor-plan was not the final. Actually it was between 10 and 12 thouthands depending of the show.

Ana
Guest
Ana

This shoe box meets the demands, so it will host. You will have to overcome this hysteria of yours.

Roman
Guest
Roman

As for me, height of the roof is too small. As you know, modern Eurovision visualy based on flying camera, spydercam, 2d wire-cam, long camera cranes. Pre-rig (or mothergrid) is also a must have, e.g. you need to built few layers of trusses above the stage to put lights, beamers, screens, set-design or props elements, pyro at the exact place over the stage. So as for me, low roof height leads to camera shots limitations which has a great influence on a resulting look of the Contest. For my expirience of six ESCs, the higher roof means “rich and powerful”… Read more »

Loin dici
Guest
Loin dici

But did roof height degraded the quality of pictures taken in Vienna and Kiev, Roman?

Henry
Guest
Henry

Good they’re going thru with Nadav’s promise to show us Tel Aviv. Only minus is the arena is sort of small.