Last week controversy erupted when the head of Turkish broadcaster TRT explained that Turkey would not broadcast Eurovision when acts like Conchita Wurst were involved. Now the European Broadcasting Union has issued a statement, confirming the core values of Eurovision.

In a statement published by the Thomson Reuters Foundation, an EBU spokesperson confirmed that “The Eurovision Song Contest’s values are of universality and inclusivity and our proud tradition of celebrating diversity through music.”

The statement follows comments İbrahim Eren, the general manager of the state-run broadcaster TRT. Speaking as part of a panel discussion at İbn Haldun University, Eren told the audience that it all came down to performers like Conchita Wurst — who won Eurovision two years after Turkey withdrew.

At the time, he explained, “As a public broadcaster, we also cannot broadcast live at 9 p.m. — when children are still awake — someone like the bearded Austrian who wore a skirt, do not believe in genders and says that he is both a man and a woman.”

He also spoke of Turkey’s dissatisfaction with the Eurovision voting system and the 50/50 televote/jury split. When Turkey withdrew from Eurovision, they claimed this was the primary reason they were unhappy with the song contest. He said, “We don’t consider to rejoin the contest. We have reasons like the voting system.”

In their statement, the EBU was also clear to note that Turkey is very much welcome to return to the song contest. The spokesperson said, “TRT has made a huge contribution to the contest in the past, including hosting the event in Istanbul in 2004, and we would very much welcome them back should they decide to participate again.

Turkey at the Eurovision Song Contest

Turkey debuted at the Eurovision Song Contest in 1975 and was a regular competitor until its withdrawal after 2012.

Turkey’s best result was in 2003 when Sertab Erener won with the ethnobop “Everyway That I Can”. Turkey then hosted the song contest the following year. More recently, Turkey placed second in 2010 when rock band maNga placed second with “We Could Be the Same”.

Should Turkey return to the Eurovision Song Contest? Tell us what you think in the comment section below!

Read more Turkey Eurovision news here

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Gran Signora
Gran Signora
3 years ago

It was because of disinterest about the contest and I guess also for lack of money for an eventual hosting. I hope the best for Turkey’s future, they’ll return as we did 😉

Joe
Joe
3 years ago

If they’re so annoyed at the Big Five, how come that didn’t bother them for years? Their win and subsequent successes all came under the Big Five (and they let Germany into Turkvision and let themselves go straight to the final).

Jo.
Jo.
3 years ago

They will return, probably in the late 2020’s.

Erasmus
Erasmus
3 years ago
Reply to  Jo.

Maybe, but what if they get someone even worse than Erdogan

Andi
Andi
3 years ago
Reply to  Erasmus

Erdogan set the bar pretty low. Anything after him would be better.

NickC
NickC
3 years ago

We will sooner or later come back as the economy is in shatters and the end for our dictator seems near

Eastman
Eastman
3 years ago

Turkey had seven top ten finishes in a decade and they gave us some of the biggest bops of the 2000s. They need to get rid of their drag-o-phobia and start giving us quality tunes again!

Polegend Godgarina
3 years ago
Reply to  Eastman

They’d probably send the most heterosexual-pandering acts like their 2011 flop to balance it out.

Roy Moreno
Roy Moreno
3 years ago

They’ve been doing so well before they withdrew…
Even San Marino are still competing and they’ve qualified only once, reaching 24th place, so that excuse of the voting process, simply, no.