So we’re all heading to Tel Aviv for Eurovision 2019 and this is definitely a reason to celebrate. But apparently this is could be a VERY expensive party.

Only four days have passed since the announcement of the host city and the price of accommodation in the city — from low-end hostels to high-end hotels — is soaring…in some cases by over 1,000 percent! Although similar price hikes occur in the host city every year, fans may feel the pinch more in 2019 following two relatively cheap host cities (in Lisbon and Kyiv).

According to Hotels Combined, a website for hotel searches, prices for the Eurovision weekend have already increased by thousands of shekels (NIS). For example, the price of a 5-star hotel room on Rothschild Avenue will cost in the region of NIS 7,400 (1,770 euros) for two nights (Friday 17/5 – Saturday 18/5) compared to only NIS 3,500 (838 euros) on a regular weekend. The most striking jump is in Montefiore Street, a chic neighbourhood close to Rothschild Avenue, where prices have jumped by 1,346% from NIS 990 (237 euros) to NIS 14,318 (3,429 euros) during the Eurovision weekend.

The same trend has been noted regarding cheaper accommodation such as hostels in south Tel Aviv. The cost of two nights in a double room has jumped from NIS 454 to 983 (109 euros to 235 euros).

Eyal Segal of Hotels Combined told Globes that the shocking price increase is down to the number of hotels and visitors. The city has 2,060 registered hotels and holiday apartments, which must now accommodate around 20,000 addition Eurovision visitors on top of their normal number of visitors. He added that the rise in numbers will probably lead to more accommodation in private houses that will be converted into guesthouses to offer more options.

Fortunately Airbnb prices still look reasonable and within a competitive range. Curiously, we found that a luxurious apartment with 2 bedrooms in Ramat Aviv (a neighbourhood in north Tel Aviv) will cost around NIS 260 per night (62 euros) and 520 for the weekend (124 euros). Despite the fact that this area is quite far from the centre, it is very close to the arena.  We’ve also checked for apartments in Jaffa (aka Tel Aviv’s Old Town), which is close to the Charles Clore Park, where Eurovision Village is meant to be built. It’s quite fair – NIS 330 per night (around 79 euros). One bedroom apartments in the centre are also quite cheap for now, averaging NIS 200 per night (48 euros).

Social media users in Israel have reacted with rage with many asking the state to intervene and control the prices in order to prevent landlords and hotel owners from taking advantage of the event. Others claim that this is only due to the hype that the announcement created and that the prices will decline.

Kazakhstan to participate?

As you wait for prices to drop, fill your time with thoughts of which countries will participate.

MAKO has published that around 42 countries will probably participate in Eurovision 2019 after Iceland and Ireland confirmed their participation — despite earlier calls to boycott the contest in Israel. It was also suggested that due to the positive relationship between Israel and Kazakhstan, it might join the 64th edition in Tel Aviv, bringing the number of participating countries to 43 (and matching the existing record).

What do you think? Do you intend to stay in Tel Aviv during the contest? Have you already booked? Let us know down below!

 

 

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Alex
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Alex

I translated the countries mentioned by MAKO and I don’t see Romania… Are they withdrawing?

Robyn Gallagher
Editor

Romania is on their list of countries that have not yet confirmed but are expected to do so. It’s totally normal for Romania to not have confirmed at this time of year.

But listen, that website’s list just looks like a rehash of the Wikipedia entry – complete with the claim that Croatia has confirmed (they haven’t yet). It doesn’t look like they know anything that isn’t already out there.

Alex
Guest
Alex

Oh ok thanks!

Roy Moreno
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Roy Moreno

Yep, how can you say no to money…
Anyway, 42 countries will probably compete? We had 43 last year, who’s out? 🙁

Joe
Guest
Joe

They say in the article that those financial issues Macedonia was facing that almost made them withdraw this year could spell trouble for 2019. Hopefully not, although they have been going through a helluva downward spiral (it’s the staging! Just fix the staging, goddammit, the songs are already there!).

Eastman
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Eastman

The EBU have literally said they have no plans to invite Kazakhstan to the Eurovision Song Contest.

MrGreenFR
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MrGreenFR

They said the same for Australia in 2014 and we all know what came next ? Never take for granted what the EBU says

Rick
Guest

they said no ‘CURRENT’ plans. that was back in july. Plans change and i feel a lot of it depends on their jesc participation this year. if they do well they cud be invited for esc 2019!

Joe
Guest
Joe

Thing is, JESC is happening after the participation deadline. But Kazakhstan are taking their JESC selection very seriously, so that might impress them.

Stacey
Guest

Australia was added even after the draw in January. Kazakhstan might b announced in December right before allocation draw but after jesc

Joe
Guest
Joe

I’m more interested in the potential competitors – if they’re saying 42, 43 if Kazakhstan actually (finally!) make their debut, that means somebody dropped out. Maybe they just didn’t count Israel, but there’s every chance either one of the countries we worried about dropped out (I’m thinking San Marino, Macedonia, or Montenegro, but my heart would break if any of them left), or they gave Kazakhstan the associate member spot at the expense of Australia. Or it could be miscounting and we’re looking at 43 (maybe 44!) countries. Me personally, if I go, I’ll probably be staying with relatives, so… Read more »

Joe
Guest
Joe

OK, having now read the article, the troubled country might be Macedonia and Kazakhstan, as ever, isn’t that likely. But they seem optimistic that nobody will drop out, so either we’ll get Macedonia and no Kazakhstan, or both, or neither.

Also, the 27 has become 30, as Albania, Portugal, and Georgia all confirmed participation today (I was worried Portugal might drop out cuz of how expensive 2018 was and Georgia would because of the poor results, but fortunately that hasn’t stopped them at all).