Last week Israel Hayom revealed that KAN had published a tender for the construction of the Eurovision 2019 stage. In it they specified that they intend to increase the capacity of the audience, and it was suggested that KAN would consider downsizing the stage to achieve this.

We’ve now combed through their weekend edition and discovered additional details about the tender, which may offer insight into KAN’s general plans for the arena and the show. We’re happy to present you with the major points.

A sealed tender

The tender is a sealed one. This means that KAN and the EBU have invited specific candidates to apply. As this is a tender, no names were given but they contacted respected stage designers both in Israel and abroad. How much do you want to bet that a certain Florian Wieder was on their list?

Usually the best offer wins — and not just artistically but also economically. If two offers are equally good then an Israeli designer will probably be selected. While they’re thinking globally, the preference is likely to act locally. Beyond this the identity of the designer is irrelevant provided that they comply with the terms of the tender.

The concept

The main condition in the tender deals with the concept of the production as a whole. This has been defined as follows:

Despite the fact that Israel does not form part of Europe, it has been connected to it since the beginning of history….in Israel this spirit and soul are embodied. Israel is a modern country representing globalization on the one hand, and personal interactions between its people on the other. Israelis like being together, and to feel united. Israelis live in a challenging area and are well-connected to the world surrounding us. Israel is a colourful, diverse and multi-cultural country. As such, it is based upon respect and acceptance. It is a traditional country but also an innovative and modern one, like the values of the Eurovision”.

Although this sounds quite general on first glance, there is also a message to Europe, which is perhaps delivered due to the calls to boycott Eurovision 2019 in Israel. Talk of boycotts almost seems passé now that 38 countries have already confirmed their participation before the deadline.

“Israel invites you all to celebrate the aspiration and desire to come closer and to be united. Israel is capable of doing this even better with you.”

One can’t help but wonder whether this invitation suggests that the Eurovision 2019 slogan will be based on a similar concept such as “when the past meets the future” as suggested by some fans.

Curiously, in a survey made by the biggest Eurovision Israeli fan groups on Facebook, the most desired slogan is simply “Shalom, Europe!”. Here at wiwibloggs a similar suggestion was made alongside some other original ideas.

It is also worth mentioning that the second most desired slogan is “Kapara Aleichem”, a slang expression used for exaggerated affection and appreciation, which is what Netta said after her performance both in the semi-final and in the final…

The stage

One of the main sections of the tender deals with the stage. It states that its design must be “iconic, with an Israeli identity, unique, modern, innovative and creative, significant and multi-purpose”. The conditions also require that the design would conform with the branding of Eurovision in general but also with the fact that the contest is taking place in Israel this time.  This may also suggest that both modern and traditional elements will be brought together.

As regards to the stage itself, it appears that the LED screens are going to play a significant role, as indicated by one of the organizers:

“The stage is a very important part of the show and it must allow many options in terms of the production. In Portugal there were no LED screens. Instead, pyrotechnics and lightning were used which made some of the entries look the same”.

He also added that the stage will appear different for each entry and therefore it must be versatile to allow many alternatives. As Israel is a start-up nation with many hi-tech companies “the audience will expect to see a very progressive Eurovision in that aspect and this is what we intend to deliver“.

Although we suspect that Eurovision 2019 stage will be down-scaled, judging by the article from Israel Hayom and the statements made by the organizers, it appears that KAN knows that one of the key aspects for a successful Eurovision is the size of the stage. The organizers emphasise that the stage must be impressive and that KAN is open to various suggestions such as round or triangle shapes with or without a catwalk. The tender obliges each applicant to provide eight different vantage points of the stage, five different vantage points of the green room and three different vantage points of the EBU supervision area.

The show’s lineup

As we are in the very premature stage of the production, the line-up is still unclear, although some initial ideas are being considered. According to Israel Hayom, KAN plans to continue the tradition that started two years ago in Stockholm – a parade with all the candidates appearing from different sides of the stage.

Israel Hayom also confirms what has been speculated previously, namely, that the green room will be located outside of the venue due to its relatively small size. Under the tender’s conditions, the green room must include 26 separate areas for the delegations with at least 10 seats each, including a designated area for press. It is also specified that the green room should be “in line with the design of the stage and its space must be used effectively”.

The green room will also include 2,000 additional seats to allow more spectators to watch the show “as live as it can be”. The main reason is to increase audience capacity but also to ensure that more fans attend the show. This is because 60% of the tickets (c. 5,000 out of 9,000) are allocated to delegations and EBU associations, leaving only 4,000 for fans. KAN understands that more fans means more celebration and happy vibes as stated by one of the organizers:

“One of our concerns is that the audience will be “indifferent” because many of them are invited and are not typical fans. Fans are very important as they contribute to the energy in the arena. Our aim is therefore to sell as many tickets as we can to the public”.

Security

A specific condition in the tender demands maximum security in order to avoid incidents such as the one we’ saw recently in Lisbon when a stage invader crashed SuRie’s performance. The tender reflects this: “the final design including any adjustments will be subject to the security demands, in specific, to disallow any access to the stage”.

International Convention Centre CFO, Mr Tamir Dayan, says that the ICC fought for the right to host the contest despite the relatively small size of the venue compared to the Pais arena in Jerusalem and that the ICC can assure that the preparation and execution will be “outstanding”.

Eurovision 2019 timeline

This is the estimated schedule for the upcoming events regarding the tender and constructions.

  • October: submission of applications by interested applicants
  • November:
    • selection completed by KAN and EBU
    • approval of the concept
  • December to February: submission of a detailed plan
  • End of March – Mid April: construction
  • End of April: Technical rehearsals
  • Early May: Artists’ rehearsals

What do you think about the initial plan? Can you imagine the stage already? Do you think that adding 2,000 seats will address fans’ concerns? What about the suggested slogans?

Share your ideas with us below!

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Christian
Christian
2 years ago

I really liked their stage from 1999 when they were hosting it. Very interesting style. I just wish that we could go back to 2014 in terms of stage and backing singers. I don’t like how it’s been in recent years.

pedro
pedro
2 years ago

LEDaholic fans will have multiple orgasms for sure XD

Fatima
Fatima
2 years ago

So many things are already “iconic” these days. We need a new word.

Matthew
Matthew
2 years ago

How about this (William and Deban call me, but you can’t) the slogan for the contest would be “Find Your Flow” as it is serving some Tel Aviv realness. The show would be hosted by Chen Aharoni, Lucy Ayoub and the legendary Gal Gadot and they would all take turns at Green Room duty. The stage would consist of an LED ornamental ring above and if you look down it resembles a clock as Tel Aviv is (one of) the city that never sleeps. And if that wasn’t enough, for the opening of Semi Final 2 the hosts would be… Read more »

CyxCy
CyxCy
2 years ago

But please DON’T use red lights! XD

Trh
Trh
2 years ago

LEDs does take away the props. In 2017 we have seen some of the most cringy props like canons, baloons, pyramids and giant moons. As for LEDs, excuse me, but since when is seeing a giant moving selfie interesting?…

CookyMonzta
CookyMonzta
2 years ago
Reply to  Trh

“A giant moving selife”: Amusing, but accurate. If it becomes a disturbing trend, where we eventually (perhaps within a few as the next 3 years) see a dozen countries splatter the artists’ faces across the LED screens for lack of creativity, that’ll be the time to take an extended break from the LED screens. They saw the early signs that this trend was in the early stages of mushrooming out of control, and maybe that’s why they decide to take a break in Lisbon.

Trh
Trh
2 years ago
Reply to  Trh

* I meant does *not* take away the props. And I forgot the most notable of all the 2017 props… our dear Italian monkey.

Alkisti
Alkisti
2 years ago

Not nice to criticize publicly the previous host. And besides, LEDs turn every act into the same thing.

Geo
Geo
2 years ago

Yes, the leds are back! Finally!!! After the simple, awful stage in Portugal, it’s a great news!!!

Trh
Trh
2 years ago
Reply to  Geo

When creativity lacks let’s get LEDs. Awful is your taste.

Jo.
Jo.
2 years ago

I prefer without LED. Better stanging, less video gaming.

CookyMonzta
CookyMonzta
2 years ago
Reply to  Jo.

Hmmm… A DOTA 2 fan here, maybe? 🙂

Henry
Henry
2 years ago

Let me guess, a star shaped stage like the Israeli flag?

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago
Reply to  Henry

That’s a pretty great idea, actually. Or a circular/hexagonal stage with a star LED floor.

David
David
2 years ago

Will it be a 4K production? KAN has a special channel used for 4K, which broadcast the World Cup in 4K this summer.

BULSCHIET
BULSCHIET
2 years ago
Reply to  David

I guess it depends on the budget, but it is very likely to happen.

Den
Den
2 years ago

Last year’s stage was a huge disappointment. It was very lame on TV. Please change the stage designer! Copenhagen 2014 and Stockholm 2016 are still the best stages so far from the last couple of years

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago

About the LED-etc. things. 1. There are pros and cons for applying LED or not. LED can effectively fill and enhance stage, but can distract the focus from, or drown, the performer. Non-LED stages put more personal touch, yet can be so void and liveless if not utilized well. 2. Each broadcaster has their own right to choose the staging to set up the theme they want to convey. Big LED for a festive sensation? Sure! Maybe just some lighting to make it personal? That can do! 3. . . . do not forget, we have other options of lighting… Read more »

Mr. Vanilla Bean
Mr. Vanilla Bean
2 years ago

Hallelujah to the return of LEDs! No Eurovision should happen without that. Not sure how exactly you give a stage an Israeli identity but I guess we’ll see. In that case, i would consider it rather inappropriate though if the gig went to the guy who does it literally all the time. Also, an audience not consisting of your typical Eurovision fan wankers does not automatically mean they’re indifferent. Although I will admit that the invitation-only audience selection in Jerusalem 1999 was a rather pathetic state of affairs. As far as the information in this article is concerned, the organizers… Read more »

Maxim
Maxim
2 years ago

You fill the stage with hot guys, this is how you make it Israeli.

Mr. Vanilla Bean
Mr. Vanilla Bean
2 years ago
Reply to  Maxim

Well, the can do so for the interval or the hosts, but we are talking about the stage itself here which apparently should have an Israeli identity. Or do you suggest just leaving the hot guys for all the countries as part of the inventory?

Henrikh Mugosa
Henrikh Mugosa
2 years ago
Reply to  Maxim

Bring the Golden Boys back!

Laura
Laura
2 years ago

LED must be there. Is a must in 2019. National finals have LED, why not Eurovision? Each country must decide if it will use it wisely, or not. In my humble opinion :
-Doredos don’t need LED, Fokas Evangelinos does not need LED.
-Jacques Houdek used LED wisely, to show the duet.
-Australia 2017 was a victim of Sasha Jean Baptiste, her lack of imagination just put Isaiah face on big screen. Only her fault, not the host’s.

Trh
Trh
2 years ago
Reply to  Laura

National finals have LEDs because it has become a cheap technology and evey vulgar TV show use them now.

Roma
Roma
2 years ago

I would prefer a stage without LED screens. Most countries just relay on those screens and the result is a boring performance. It was much more interesting last year. Whatever

Zebb
Zebb
2 years ago

5K seats out, wow! Most countries really need to save money in advance for non-profit event.

Fast Food Music Lover
Fast Food Music Lover
2 years ago

I hope whatever design KAN come up it will be enough to satisfy everyone’s stage performances. It was a bit cringey this year when almost everyone decided to bring their own ministage to supplement the LED-free stage.

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago

Almost everyone would be an exaggeration. According to my observation, there are probably 21 acts out of 42 with non-instrumental props and only 9 of them have ministages.

Mr. Vanilla Bean
Mr. Vanilla Bean
2 years ago
Reply to  Loin dici

Those numbers are very telling and do not aid your point at all, actually.

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago

Let me clarify my point, then. The acts using ministages (yes, only ministages, not including other props) in 2018 are Belarus, Austria, Finland, United Kingdom, Czech Republic, Sweden, Bulgaria, the Netherlands, and Azerbaijan (this one is debatable, but I considered those as ministages). Counting 9 acts out of 42 as “almost everyone” is considerably an exaggeration. This probably isn’t that valuable of an information, but more of a confirmation.

Mr. Vanilla Bean
Mr. Vanilla Bean
2 years ago
Reply to  Loin dici

I am not calling them everyone. I am saying that nine countries (I did not count, I am taking your numbers here) feeling the need to enhance the actual stage is a very high number. Those countries obviously thought they weren’t given enough options with that stage. Also keep in mind that probably not every country could afford having their own stage, maybe even more would have liked to bring their own. Also, speaking of affordability, Germany comes to mind off the top of my head, as you did not include it. Correct me if I am wrong, but didn’t… Read more »

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago

Well, I was reffering to FFML’s point to say there are only 9 performers with actual ministages (the ones that you can step on), but here we go. There are more than just nine performers that doesn’t have a good option to fill the stage. Referring to James’ comment down below, prop-less stagings also suffered from the lack of LED. Yes, the delegations would have liked to bring more to their staging but don’t have the logistics to do so. Yes, Germany brought a half-circular LED screen. I have to agree to your point that some staging felt void and… Read more »

Trh
Trh
2 years ago

This also happened with LEDs… Canons, baloons and moons anyone?…

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago
Reply to  Trh

Well, we can’t deny those! At least, Lucie’s mermaid shell is out of cringe, it’s beautiful.

Trh
Trh
2 years ago
Reply to  Loin dici

With that I agree. It was indeed beautiful and classy.

Trh
Trh
2 years ago
Reply to  Loin dici

Oh yes… And I forgot monkeys…

Image of me
Image of me
2 years ago

Why do you capitalize KAN? It’s not an acronym in Hebrew.

James
James
2 years ago
Reply to  Image of me

Probably for greater emphasis and highlight the fact that it is the name of the broadcaster. I do wonder how IPBC decided to use this as their shortform brand name in the first place.

Maya G
Maya G
2 years ago
Reply to  James

‘Kan’ mean ‘Here’ in Hebrew, and this is their reasoning for choosing it as their brand name: “After examining dozens of proposals, the IPBC management chose […] the name ‘Kan’, which symbolizes the commitment to express the diversity of currents in Israeli society and the pluralism that characterizes it. We are here, preparing for an independent, diverse and high quality public broadcast […] ‘Kan’ expresses the recognition that public broadcast is a part of Israeli society, belongs to Israeli society and is the means of expressing all that is happening here.” The brand name was revealed in July 2016, at… Read more »

Maya
Maya
2 years ago
Reply to  Maya G

The last program of the IBA was the Eurovision in Kiev. We thought that IMRI ZIV will be the last one that we send. Everyone were in total shock !!!! They put this song for goodbye (in the link) after the Eurovision in Kiev and shut down the channel…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fHJmz4KMP8

David
David
2 years ago
Reply to  Maya

Such a drama, but already then many said that Israel would probably continue to participate. A lot of it was just politics, since KAN seems to not like so much the government of Bibi. From what I see, KAN is a more modern station than IBA was. So seems to be working out alright?

Door
Door
2 years ago
Reply to  David

Actually, yeah. The crew of KAN is in average much younger than the crew of IBA and this can really be felt. They listen to demands from their audience (although they have a rather small share of it) and deliver the best experience they can (i.e. being the first local 4k broadcast in Israel with the world cup this summer).

Pancake
Pancake
2 years ago

I kinda want to see Tel Aviv do a 360° stage with a LED screen for a cool backdrop.

Maya G
Maya G
2 years ago
Reply to  Pancake

How is it even possible to have a backdrop in a 360° stage?
A 360° stage has no front or back, it’s surrounded by seats.

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago
Reply to  Maya G

Instead of having LED, they could use projections, something like Copenhagen ’14.

Maya G
Maya G
2 years ago
Reply to  Loin dici

In a A 360° stage you don’t have a backdrop on which to project.

BULSCHIET
BULSCHIET
2 years ago
Reply to  Maya G

You can have a big backdrop far away, like in 2011. The problem is that those stages need to have huge ramps for the props, if the stage is surrounded by audience – there’s no way to move the props in and out. That’s why even in 2011 it wasn’t really a 360 stage.

Maya G
Maya G
2 years ago
Reply to  BULSCHIET

Again, having a backdrop means the stage has a front and a back, and obviously there’s no audience behind it or it would block the backdrop – so it wouldn’t be a 360° stage.
Indeed the logistics is also an issue.

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago
Reply to  Maya G

Something like JESC 2010, perhaps?

Polegend Godgarina
2 years ago

It was so good without LEDs in Portugal, it made artists work for more interesting performances.

Catriona Colville
Catriona Colville
2 years ago

Except it didn’t work. It had some of the most uninspiring staging ever. LED screens need to be featured heavily, and then each delegation can choose whether to use them or not.

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago

Is it a norm for most big shows to have gigantic LED screens? LED can do well, but it can have even more uninspiring results, like those geometric shapes and gigantic portraits in 2017. Featuring it heavily would give us excessive drown of screens like 2009. It’s all back to the broadcasters’ choice to feature LED.

Jo.
Jo.
2 years ago

Tell me about those images in Ukraine, all those faces on the screens. That’s uninspiring.

Trh
Trh
2 years ago

Of course it did work. What did not work was the uninspired LED videos in Kiev

Trh
Trh
2 years ago

Finally someone says this! Thank YOU!

James
James
2 years ago

The stage in Lisbon was fine without the need of a LED backdrop. The reason that some performances looked the same for some is probably because the space was not adequately utilized. In most recent contests with LED’s, the backdrops tend to be too distracting that the attention is taken away from the performer. Croatia’s staging felt empty and needed more than just Franka singing on stage. Belgium’s came up short in translating elements of Sennek’s music video to the stage. Greece seemed to have clashing ideas on how to enhance “Oneiro Mou” that in the end, it looked like… Read more »

Davve
Davve
2 years ago

They could do “smaller stage” like in Germany in 2011, quite small stage but with huge surrounding that makes a great impression.

Or they could go wrong and do “small stage” like in Finland in 2007 which was too small for several acts and did not give the artists freedom of expression…..

I hope they go for the first alternative.

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago

No Wieder this year, please. 5 years of his stage is enough.

Henrikh Mugosa
Henrikh Mugosa
2 years ago
Reply to  Loin dici

Amen.

bastian
bastian
2 years ago

Hell no to that Wieder guy. I dont like his stages at all. Not inspiring at all.

CookyMonzta
CookyMonzta
2 years ago
Reply to  bastian

Did he do Copenhagen 2014? That was a pretty good stage design.

The rest (with the exception of Lisbon, IF he was involved with that one), meh.

Loin dici
Loin dici
2 years ago
Reply to  CookyMonzta

Nope, it’s done by Claus Zier.

CookyMonzta
CookyMonzta
2 years ago
Reply to  Loin dici

Then get Claus for the Tel Aviv stage.

esc1234
esc1234
2 years ago

seriosly Israel, do something original by NOT picking florian wieder. Enough is enough with his uninspired stages.

FanESC
FanESC
2 years ago

Led screens, I missed you so much.

Joshua
Joshua
2 years ago

Concerning the stage, they could do something like Düsseldorf 2011 when the actual stage was minuscule, but the background and everything around it was huge.

As for the slogan, I think a simple “Shalom” is the smartest option. “Kapara Aleichem” sounds nice, but who’s going to understand it? I certainly didn’t know what that meant. “Shalom” is a more familiar word to foreigners.
If they really choose one of these slogans, I think it would be the first non-English slogan, which perfectly embodies the cultural uniqueness Israelis want to show this year.

Izzy
Izzy
2 years ago
Reply to  Joshua

Totally agree with you! I’ll post this on KANs website as well and hope they will consider this

Henrikh Mugosa
Henrikh Mugosa
2 years ago
Reply to  Joshua

You could have explained the meaning of “Kapara Aleichem”…

Henrikh Mugosa
Henrikh Mugosa
2 years ago
Reply to  Izhar Levy

Ok, now I understand it better. Thanks for taking the time to explain. I’m just not sure it would be a good slogan as people not familiar with Israeli culture, like myself, would not get it.

Henrikh Mugosa
Henrikh Mugosa
2 years ago
Reply to  Joshua

“I would sacrifice myself for you” Hmm… Why would this be a good slogan?

Raoul
Raoul
2 years ago
Reply to  Henrikh Mugosa

That is a VERY imprecise translation… It means something like “may you be atoned”, but with a lighthearted, endearing tone.

Maya G
Maya G
2 years ago
Reply to  Raoul

I would say it’s quite precise, Kapara Aleichem is derived from the Jewish-Moroccan saying “Nimshi Kapara Alik” , meaning “I would sacrifice myself so that your sins may be atoned” (or quite simply – “I would die for you”). Though the literal meaning is morbid and melodramatic, you are right that it is said lightheartedly and affectionately.
Here’s an linguistic analysis of the expression (in Hebrew):
https://glz.co.il/%D7%92%D7%9C%D7%A6/%D7%AA%D7%95%D7%9B%D7%A0%D7%99%D7%95%D7%AA/%D7%9E%D7%94-%D7%91%D7%95%D7%A2%D7%A8/%D7%9E%D7%94-%D7%91%D7%95%D7%A2%D7%A813-05-2018-0901/%D7%94%D7%93%D7%A8-%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%91%D7%99%D7%A7-%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%96%D7%A0%D7%98%D7%9C-%D7%A2%D7%9C-%D7%9B%D7%A4%D7%A8%D7%94-%D7%A2%D7%9C%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%9D-%D7%96%D7%95-%D7%9E%D7%99%D7%9C%D7%94-%D7%A7%D7%A9%D7%94-%D7%9E%D7%94%D7%9E%D7%A7%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%AA-%D7%A9%D7%94%D7%A4%D7%9B%D7%94-%D7%9C%D7%9E%D7%99%D7%9C%D7%94-%D7%A0%D7%97%D7%9E%D7%93%D7%94-%D7%95%D7%98%D7%95%D7%91%D7%94

Joe
Joe
2 years ago

I love this behind the scenes stuff! They clearly know what they’re doing and I’m excited to see the final product.

cyprus
cyprus
2 years ago

So back to boring screens with big faces on it, instead of epic props

Mongolia
Mongolia
2 years ago
Reply to  cyprus

Oh, can it

North dakota
North dakota
2 years ago
Reply to  cyprus

Why not both

Isle of Man
Isle of Man
2 years ago
Reply to  North dakota

You’re right!

Christmas island
Christmas island
2 years ago
Reply to  Isle of Man

Happy we agree 😀

CookyMonzta
CookyMonzta
2 years ago
Reply to  cyprus

The screens, I have no problem with. The faces on the screen, BIG problem! When a set designer or the whole team runs out of ideas so quickly (or has none to begin with) that they decide to throw the artist’s face on the screen at random, that tells me that maybe they shouldn’t have bothered to use the screens. After all, we can plainly see the artist’s face on stage. Why resort to irrelevant redundancy? When one country floats the artist’s face on the screen, hardly anyone will notice. When 2 do it, people will start to notice. When… Read more »