As the metaphorical curtains fall on Europe’s greatest stage, and the literal Glass Microphone passes hands for the last time this decade, it’s time to take a stroll down Memory Lane. And as we do, we see some of the sights, highlights and firsts that the years 2010 to 2019 have given us. This is by no means a Top 10 list or a list of our favourite and least favourite moments. It’s simply remembering, celebrating and acknowledging the last 10 years of our all-time favourite live show. So let’s begin!

1. Italy returned (2011)

In December 2010, Italophiles rejoiced as Italy announced its return to the contest after a 14-year absence. In doing so the two-time Eurovision winner (and the country that gave us Eurovision classic “Volare”) turned the “Big 4” into the “Big 5”. But they definitely earned their automatic qualification. Their first Eurovision back, Raphael Gualazzi managed to garner a second-place finish. Since then they have achieved a third place finish (in 2015 with Il Volo) and another second place finish (in 2019 with Mahmood).

With the exceptions of 2014 and 2016, Italy has consistently finished on the lefthand side of the scoreboard. And they’ve done so as one of the few countries singing (mostly) in their own language.

2. We got our first “Big 5” win courtesy of Germany (2010)

The 2010’s started with a bang for the Big 5 nations of Germany, Spain, France, Italy and the UK. It had been ten years since the “Big 5” concept was introduced in 2000. And while the noughties started strong for them (the UK finished 3rd in 2002 with Jessica Garlick; Spain reached 8th in 2003 with Dime), things soon went downhill. A Big 5 country finished last in 2003, 2005, and 2008. So it was with renewed vigour and a youthful, catchy tune that Germany stormed the scoreboard in 2010 and won with Lena’s “Satellite”. Their song, much like Lena’s aim, was “straight and true”.

3. The first Parade of Flags (2013)

Sweden won the right to host the 2013 edition of Eurovision after Loreen’s landslide victory with “Euphoria” in Baku in 2012. The Parade of Flags had already been a part of Junior Eurovision since 2004, and the Swedes introduced it into Eurovision 2013. All of the finalist countries’ flags were shown, with the contestants themselves walking to the main stage via a bridge above the audience. This spectacle, bringing national identities and camaraderie together in an obvious and visual way, was repeated by the Danes in 2014 and the Austrians in 2015. It has subsequently become a tradition for the Eurovision grand final.

4. Måns came to Eurovision — and never left (2015)

The 2015 edition took place in Austria for the first time since 1967 — a whopping gap of 48 years! But the contest was remarkable for other reasons, too. It gave us Måns Zelmerlöw as winner with his song ‘’Heroes’’. And whether you like it or not, this would not be last time that we would see this charming, winning hero. Hosting the contest the following year, Måns and his co-host, Petra Mede, performed an unforgettable interval act – the now classic “Love, Love, Peace, Peace”.

But Måns’ Eurovision story doesn’t end there. In 2017 he doubled as both commentator for Swedish broadcaster SVT and as a personal instructor for the Ukrainian hosts. In a pre-filmed clip that aired during the Grand Final, we saw a dapper, Bond-like Måns give a master-class on how to be the perfect host. The hosting duties continued to pour in — he co-hosted the UK national final Eurovision: You Decide in both 2018 and 2019.

And, most recently, he returned to the Eurovision stage in 2019 in Tel Aviv (more on that below). Special shout-out to Måns for always giving back to his fans. He’s one of a handful of performers to have sung at the Wiwi Jam not once, but twice — slaying our stages in Kyiv and Tel Aviv.

5. The smallest distance Eurovision travelled since 1994/1995

Technically, the shortest distance that Eurovision has travelled between editions was…zero kilometres between 1994 and 1995! The contest, hosted by Ireland and won by Ireland, was held consecutively in the same venue and the same city – the one and only time this happened in Eurovision history. But the 2010’s saw the second shortest distance travelled.

With Malmö hosting the 2013 edition and Copenhagen the 2014 edition, the distance between the two contests was only…27km! While separated by the sea, the two cities are connected by the Öresund Bridge and a train ride between the two only takes 30 minutes! Even with the Double Dublin statistic, this marked the shortest distance between editions hosted in two different countries.

6. The greatest distance Eurovision travelled EVER (2019)

Israel’s win in 2018 in Lisbon meant that the following edition of Eurovision would cover the greatest distance between editions in the history of the contest – an unbelievable 4062km would be crossed as the contest moved to Tel Aviv. This equates to most of the length of the Mediterranean Sea and Spain.

This beat the previous record set by…Israel in 1998/1999. Dana International won the 1998 edition held in Birmingham and the following year saw the contest held in Jerusalem.

7. Azerbaijan and Portugal claim their first victories (2011 and 2017)

Over the past 10 years of Eurovision, nine countries won the glass microphone. That’s down to Sweden winning twice within three years — winning their fifth contest in 2012 and their sixth in 2015.

Of the remaining countries to come out on top this decade, Azerbaijan and Portugal saw their first ever victories. Azerbaijan, one of the more recent countries to join, did so just three years after debuting in 2008. While Portugal, which debuted in 1964, was, until its win, the country waiting the longest for victory.

Germany, Austria and Ukraine saw their second victories, Denmark its third, Israel its fourth and The Netherlands its fifth. Here’s to the next crop of Eurovision winners.

8. The Switch Song brought back legends of the past decade (2019)

As we mentioned in #4, Måns Zelmerlöw performed at the 2019 Eurovision in Tel Aviv. But this time he did so as part of the Switch Song Segment that brought together some of the most recognisable figures of recent editions. In addition to Måns, we saw 2014 winner Conchita Wurst (Austria), 2018 runner-up Eleni Foureira (Cyprus) and 2007 runner-up Verka Serduchka (Ukraine) performing each other’s songs in their own styles. They concluded by singing Israel’s 1979 winning song “Hallelujah” along with one of the original singers, Gali Atari.

With the exception of Verka and Gali, all of the performers competed in the last decade. Their mash-up will surely linger in Eurovision’s collective memory. Indeed, many of our readers (as well as the wider interwebs) are calling for “Switch Song” to become a staple of Eurovision Grand Finals.

9. The voting changed. Then changed again, before changing again.

One of the biggest changes that we have witnessed over the last decade has been the way that voting works — and not everyone is a fan. Up until 2012, the voting was split 50/50 between juries and televoters. Each segment would award the traditional 12-10-8… points to their top ten and then the two voting streams were added together, with the top 10 entries getting the most points earning each country’s final top point allocation. The televote points broke any ties.

In 2013 the system was changed — but only in the way that jury points were allocated. Instead of listing their top ten, juries now had to rank all of the performing songs. Scores were then calculated based on aggregates and added to televotes (with the televote serving as the tiebreaker again). As many people have pointed out, this gave the jury the power to create a “drag effect” — i.e., they could really drag an act down by ranking it 23rd, 24th, etc.

Only two years later, the voting changed again. For the 2016 show, the jury and televote scores were kept separate, meaning each country now had two sets of points to give out. In 2017 we saw the highest number of points ever awarded — 758 — going to Portugal.

A lot of controversy surrounds the various voting changes. Fans regularly re-calculate recent results under old systems, showing alternate winners (including Dami Im in 2016). But in the end, we have to accept that those that won under the rules under which they competed are the rightful winners, whether we agree with the result or not.

10. Australia officially joined the Eurovision Family (2015)

The 2015 edition brought Eurovision-loving Australia into the contest fold, with Guy Sebastian officially competing in the grand final with his song “Tonight Again”. It was billed as a one-time appearance — unless they won, in which case they’d be welcomed back. After Australia came fifth, the EBU allowed them back to the show in Stockholm.

Since then, Australia has been at every Eurovision and qualified for the grand final every time. Their best finish was second in 2016 with Dami Im’s “Sound of Silence”. Considering their enthusiasm, results and high-quality music, Australia will likely be in the contest for years to come.

What’s next for Eurovision?

The last decade of Eurovision has seen the 55th to 64th editions of the song contest. That means we’ve had 64 years of Eurovision – the “good”, the “bad”, the “wacky”, you name it.

And in case we didn’t get enough of Eurovision itself, we may soon witness the birth of Eurovision Asia and the American Song Contest in the coming decade. Does this mean that we could have a Worldvision at some point in the future – where the winners from each continent compete against each other? One can only hope. Until we know for sure, onwards to The Netherlands 2020!

What were your most memorable moments of Eurovision between 2010 and 2019? Do you want more of Måns or have you had your fill? Who do you want to see win next? What performers do you want to see in another Switch Song? And do you think the voting rules will change again in the next 10 years? Let us know in the comments below.

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Jim
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Jim

My wishes for the 2020’s:

* Western Europe:
Belgium will win at least once
France, the UK and Ireland going back to their golden years

*Northern Europe:
Norway or Finland will win at least once
The Baltic countries will win at least once (especially Lithuania)

*Eastern Europe:
Hungary, Poland or the Czech Republic will win at least once
Russia will win at least once

*Southern Europe:
Italy or Spain will win at least once
Malta will win at least once

Envit
Guest
Envit

I guess those things will possibly happen: – Kazakhstan, Lichtenstein and Kosovo will debut – Bulgaria, Bosnia & Herzgovina, Luxemburg and Turkey (Possibly after Eurovision Asia) will return – Montenegro, Finland, Georgia and Latvia will withdraw – United Kingdom will “Do Italy” and take a break by withdrawing for at least for the whole decade due to the low achievements – Albania, Armenia, Hungary, Slovenia, N. Macedonia, Lithuania and Czech Rep. will reach top 3 for the first time – Along with who possibly will reach top 3 for the first time possibly also Malta, Cyprus or Romania will win… Read more »

Envit
Guest
Envit

And Italy/Denmark or Norway will win again (Most Italy!)

Kim
Guest
Kim

The next thing that should happen is to lose the big 5 . Some years these countries don’t even try because of their automatic qualification but if you dropped the big 5 some of the countries that just missed out in the semis have another 5 spots to qualify in so rather than 10 qualifying from each semi make it 13 from each semi . If that would have happened this year Poland orPortugal or Georgia who performed just as well as the winners of the semi may have gotten in to the final.

Pancake
Guest
Pancake

The Big 5 are there because they’re the biggest financial distributors of the EBU. Without them Eurovision wouldn’t be even possible so it just fair to keep the Big 5 since they’re already paying enough to keep the shows afloat!
Also, they were created when Germany didn’t qualify on to compete in 1995, and the EBU was reported upset 5 since they’re paying too much already.

MusicIstheKey
Guest
MusicIstheKey

Interesting article! If I should look into my crystal ball, I predict for the next 10 years: Kazakstahn to make their debut. Italy and Belgium to win. Possible also HUngary and Malta getting their first ever victory. I think the Swedish dominance will be less over the next years

Fatima
Guest
Fatima

Much as I like Mäns, I feel that now, he’s contributing to Swede fatigue

w22n
Guest
w22n

What about WURST? He/She/He is the reason LGBT is not taken seriously. Changing like that is embarrassing for gay people that want to be seen as normal people.

Minerva
Guest
Minerva

The best bits of this past decade for me are: 1) the return of Italy with good songs, 2) one of the Big 5 countries winning Eurovision 3) the flag parade – I think that’s really cool.

Sal
Guest
Sal

I hope we see more returnee and debut countries but I fear that we will just see more regular withdrawals (probably another 1 or 2 Ukraine-Russia spats, and maybe another Balkan country or two withdrawing).

Hatari sigrati
Guest
Hatari sigrati

Well, my predictions for the 2020s : – Malta, Cyprus, Montenegro and Belgium will win – Italy and Spain will win – France sends fan favorites and gets more appreciated than in the last 3 years – Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Liechtenstein will debut – Bosnia Herzegovina returns – Ukraine will not qualify at least once – a former winner returns – Germany will do much better and will be 2nd at least once -> not winning – Australia will never win (just because it’s Australia and most people think it would be strange of they won) – Sweden will nq for… Read more »

Darren
Guest
Darren

I actually think Australia is going to win soon. It’s only a matter of time.

Tibor
Guest
Tibor

The quality of the songs has been consistently better than in earlier decades (if we leave aside 2011), so that’s a good thing because it helps Eurovision to be taken seriously. But there are still too much viewers who associate Eurovision with a certain type of music which they claim they would never listen to outside of Eurovision. Eurovision is a long shot from being for Europe what Sanremo is for Italy, but I hope it will little by little get there. But it’s hard and a lengthy process to erase prejudices from people’s minds. I hope, Eurovision will get… Read more »

Hatari sigrati
Guest
Hatari sigrati

I just noticed, that I’m in the game here for a whole decade. I’m 20 years old and I watched 10 ESCs (my first was 2010 when Lena got Hype that year and my parents wanted to watch it too, just because our country got a chance and actually won), so i can literally say, that ESC is half of my life. Thank you Wiwibloggs for being a part of it!

Loin dici
Guest

So let’s repeat the winning country thing by a bigger demography: Northern, Western, Central, Eastern, and Southern.

2000-2009:
North: Denmark, Finland, Norway, Estonia, Latvia
West:
Central:
East: Ukraine, Turkey, Russia
South: Serbia, Greece

2000-2009:
North: Denmark, Sweden
West: Germany, the Netherlands
Central: Austria
East: Ukraine, Azerbaijan
South: Portugal, Israel

It looks more diverse.

Loin dici
Guest

Adding up to the statistics, these are the countries that received at least top three placing: 2000-2009: N: Denmark (2x), Latvia (2x), Estonia (2x), Finland, Norway, Iceland = 6 (9x) W: UK, Belgium = 2 (2x) C: 0 E: Russia (5x), Turkey, Ukraine (3x), Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, Azerbaijan = 7 (13x) S: Greece(4x), Malta(2x), Romania = 3 (7x) total: 18 2010-2019 N: Sweden (2x), Denmark =2 (3x) W: Germany, the Netherlands (2x), Australia ( 😀 ) = 3 (4x) C: Austria (2x) = 1 (2x) E: Turkey, Azerbaijan (2x), Russia (4x), Serbia, Ukraine (2x), Bulgaria = 6 (12x) S: Romania,… Read more »

Loin dici
Guest

Correction: Sweden has 4 top 3, so total of the North ones are 6 times

w22n
Guest
w22n

I wish Germany would win. Have you noticed that they have the most passionate fans? When the jury vote is announced, their spoke person Barbara is always in the middle of a crowd, live, not in front of a wallpaper.

Nina2629
Guest
Nina2629

I wouldn’t necessarily call those people Eurovision fans. Most of those people only show up because of the German acts that perform before and after the actual broadcast. To be quite hontest I have experienced Germans to be the least appreciative of Eurovision: There‘s basically almost no Eurovision song on the radio, there‘s barely any coverage on media expect for the annual „how did we end up in last place once more despite having a good, not-cringeworthy song, does Europe have no taste whatsoever?“ and it’s really hard to find anyone who actually gets my love for Eurovision, most people… Read more »

w22n
Guest
w22n

Sorry, but your song was not good enough. After all the riches you have had in Unser Lied, you made the worst choice.

Nina2629
Guest
Nina2629

I know! But that’s not what I was saying: Even though the public voted for Sister, the song wasn’t ever played on any radio station and it didn’t get any attention between February and May. I just wanted to point that no one understood the bad placing and said it was a nice song which just doesn’t match what was going on before! So there seems to be something off with the People voting in the nf tastewise!

w22n
Guest
w22n

I can’t understand what is happening with Germany, a country that always has the best resemblance to overall top 10, but can’t make a good choice for itself.

Hatari sigrati
Guest
Hatari sigrati

Well, I must disagree on this point of view. I live in an area, where SWR3 airs and they played the song frequently. I usually don’t listen to radio, but when I am with my family I do and they played it multiple times. But I agree, I never heard Levina or Jamie Lee on the radio.

Fatima
Guest
Fatima

The same thing in the UK … although you at least do have FFH Deutsch Pur, there’s nothing like that in the UK.

Darren
Guest
Darren

I would love to see Germany win again, and actually host in Berlin this time. Like Tel Aviv this year…and possibly Amsterdam next year, Berlin is just one of those cities that would suit hosting Eurovision.
Also, the 2011 contest remains my favorite song contest so far.

Sabrina
Guest
Sabrina

OFF: Since the article mentions Australia and Italy, let me use it as an excuse to go off-topic here to say that I’ve been listening to Mahmood’s album and Kate Miller-Heidke’s discography non-stop in the last weeks and I like them even more now. Zalagasper’s (yeah, that’s what they’re calling themselves from now on) EP is also very good.

ESCFan2009
Guest
ESCFan2009

Oh, the best gift that Eurovision made to me in this decade was Kate Miller-Heidke! “The last day on earth”, “Words”, “O vertigo” – all of them are absolute masterpieces <3

Loin dici
Guest

“I’m growing a Beard Downstars for Christmas” and “Are you F*cking Kidding Me?” is also worth it, check it out!

Sabrina
Guest
Sabrina

“I’m growing a Beard Downstairs for Christmas” is my favorite Christmas song already, that’s for sure!

Mr X
Guest
Mr X

Without any doubt – my greatest moment in this decade of ESC was Salvador´s victory. An unforgettable moment for me !

Sabrina
Guest
Sabrina

She’s very versatile and I love how she’s always evolving to something different musically. Not many artists are capable of address cute things and dark material at the same time and she does it. I believe even people that didn’t like “Zero Gravity” would appreciate her body of work if they gave it a chance.

Lisa
Guest
Lisa

Gioventù bruciata, the album by mahmood, is an absolute masterpiece

Mr X
Guest
Mr X

I absolutely agree !

Sabrina
Guest
Sabrina

It’s indeed a great album. Even more impressive if we consider that he wrote all the tracks.

Joe
Guest
Joe

Those two are definitely recent ESC artists whose whole discography is worth doing a dive on. There are a few other recent ones I can think of like that – first that come to mind are Salvador Sobral and Lena.

Gab
Guest
Gab

interesting choices; for me it is Hatari from this year, who I dived in so much that I am a big fan; from ealier years from this decade: Twin Twin, Triana Park, Young Georgian Lolitaz are those who I return to; and sometimes Melovin

Joe
Guest
Joe

I also love the idea of making the switch song an annual thing. Who next year? If we were to do parallels, maybe it’d be something like Helena Paparizou, Alexander Rybak, Netta, and Lordi? Then make them all sing Ding a Dong.

Loin dici
Guest

I’ve actually wrote about this down below, but I feel I still need to pinpoint it. I feel the jury system is one of the reasons Italy wants to come back. It’s kind of noticeable that Italy’s hiatus starts in 1998, which is the first time the full public voting system was used. Italy never took any part in the full public voting years, until 2011, where the jury voting system was implemented again.

w22n
Guest
w22n

Italy hiatus has to do 100% with Berlusconi being prime minister. Fact. He owns broadcasters that are competition for rai.

Joe
Guest
Joe

2009 and 2010 also had a jury vote. 2011 ran on the exact same system as the two years before it. Italy came back because It Was Time.

w22n
Guest
w22n

I fear for Italy participation if Berlusconi will be in power again. This is my prediction for 20’s.

Loin dici
Guest

Oh God. Seems Berlusconi is an Italian Trump.

w22n
Guest
w22n

He is. Berlusconi is the owner of Mediaset, RAI competitor. He doesn’t like that RAI has ESC.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silvio_Berlusconi

Loin dici
Guest

They probably see 2009 as a test, perhaps? Plus they’d probably need to organize a delegational team before it was time, but I do feel 2011 is ‘the time’ for Italy.

w22n
Guest
w22n

No!
Italy is more political than Ukraine, but people don’t want to see.

Thomas
Guest
Thomas

I think my predictions for Eurovision 2020s – Returns of Bulgaria Luxembourg and Slovakia – Sweden will qualify every year but won’t win, along with Russia – Countries that have suffered in the Semis and Finals will get their time in the sun, Slovenia North Macedonia San Marino -Czech Republic will win, Jan Bors is a great HoD and the Czech Interest is growing! -Hungary will withdraw or change its selection method completely, A Dal has been bleeding viewers and haven’t been consistent in getting great results. (Yes they qualified but Hungry has a history of withdrawing when things don’t… Read more »

Loin dici
Guest

Bringing a little politics over here.
2000s winners were dominated by Eastern countries: Estonia, Latvia, Turkey, Greece, Ukraine, Russia, Serbia.
Three countries were Western-Central (or to be exact, Nordic):
Denmark, Finland, Norway
2010s winners were:
Western-Central: Germany, Austria, Sweden, Denmark, Portugal, The Netherlands
Eastern: Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Israel

dios mio
Guest
dios mio

That’s why no matter how everyone dislike juries, they really need to be there first of all to avoid the pattern of 2000s

w22n
Guest
w22n

racist

Loin dici
Guest

where?

w22n
Guest
w22n

I was talking to dios mio, and I think he’s Charles.

dios mio
Guest
dios mio

Do not see anything racist here. On the opposite, I mean that with only televoting eastern block countries gave most of the points to each other + huge diasporas all over the Europe while in the past decade we had more diversity in winning countries from east to west, from Azerbaijan and Israel far to the Portugal and it is great.

Graph
Guest
Graph

I had been getting concerned that juries had some musical bias against songs from Eastern Europe, but North Macedonia’s jury victory this year was a good sign that juries are not too predictable to favor mainstream Western pop.

Joe
Guest
Joe

Azerbaijan and Ukraine have done pretty well with the juries most years.

Liisa
Guest
Liisa

Please don’t call Estonia and Latvia “eastern countries”

Loin dici
Guest

But this is only a rough ‘dichotomous’ division. If it was more accurate, it’ll be with the Nordics as Northern countries, don’t get me wrong.

Liisa
Guest
Liisa

Good.

nycforever
Guest
nycforever

Feel Italy winning very soon. Maybe as Big-5 Germany won in 2010, Italy will win in 2020. It’s even hard to believe that such country as Italy won only twice.

Lisa
Guest
Lisa

Italy could have won many times, above all with gualazzi, il volo, gabbani and mahmood. ..

nycforever
Guest
nycforever

Yeees( They are really like Leo DiCaprio of Eurovision.

Mr X
Guest
Mr X

Il Volo are not my cup of tea and the performance of Gabbani was quietly disappointing but the others are all great und please add to this Meta & Moro.

Cesar's salad
Guest
Cesar's salad

The 2000’s were a terrible decade for Eurovision, but 2010’s so much better. And yes, thanks to the juries. Despite voting irregularities, jury love overdose for Sweden, Malta, Australia, these past 10 years have been really good. Especially since 2015, countries mostly bring on their A-game.

Guillle77
Guest
Guillle77

God, I hate how NOBODY understands the simple mathematical truth that decades go from 01 to 10, so this decade started in 2011 (not 2010) and ends in 2020 (not this year).

w22n
Guest
w22n

Yes, but still, we call it “the 80’s 90’s 00’s 10’s”

Jo.
Guest
Jo.

The 2010’s began on January 1, 2010, and will end on December 31, 2019. That’s why we call them the “2010’s”.

This is not about “simple math”, but history! The very first decade went from year 1 to 9 (only 9 years), because there was no year 0, which means 10 AD was already part of the 2nd decade.

Cesar's salad
Guest
Cesar's salad

The very first decade went from 1 to 10. Don’t make things up!

Jo.
Guest
Jo.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/0s

The concept is relative tho, 2009-2018 is also a decade, so…

ESC Nils
Guest
ESC Nils

Oh God, how do you know history when you say the first decade went from 1 to 9 because there was no 0, when there are centuries and millenniums before the year 0. Following your idea Greeks and Romans and every people befor your non existing year 0 never even lived. No, instead it is historically correct that a decade, century or millennium begins with the 1 and finishes with the 0, but I guess with Eurovision is more fun to do the simple way 0 to 9. Please before you all say something go and inform yourself.

Jo.
Guest
Jo.

The calendar began with year 1, not “history” (before that, we use 1 BC, 2 BC…). But you are free to use some kind of ancient calendar if you want.

Robyn Gallagher
Editor

A decade is any consecutive period of ten years. There’s no rule that says when the ten years have to start and finish. For this series we are using (to quote Wiktionary) the “informal ten-year periods of the calendar whose last digits run from 0 to 9”.

Joseph Mendy
Guest
Joseph Mendy

Last time I looked this decade started in 2010 and will end after this year. This millennium started on 01.01.2000. But in terms of Eurovision this Eurovision decade (or as I like to call it a EuroDecade) started with the 2010 contest and ended after the 2019 contest. So basically it’s a new EuroDecade (remember I came up with the word EuroDecade:) next year

Graph
Guest
Graph

Here are my predictions for the 2020s:

Sweden will not win again, but will always qualify

Russia will not win again, but will always qualify

Australia will win, and will always qualify

Italy will win

San Marino will qualify at least 3 times

Ukraine’s perfect qualification record will end.

Joe
Guest
Joe

I am looking forward to your Australia and San Marino predictions coming true!

Jo.
Guest
Jo.

Ukraine NQing is just a matter of time now, it will happen soon.

Loin dici
Guest

I’m worried Ukraine will go Romania very soon 🙁

Africavision
Guest
Africavision

My most memorable moments of Eurovision 2010 to 2019: 2010: The flashmob with Madcon. It was just one of the most amazing interval acts ever! The fact that it got all parts of Europe, and the audience in the stadium, involved was a sight to behold. 2011: Stella Mwangi – She shockingly did not qualify for the grand final that year, but Stella’s journey to Eurovision was just so heart-warming. You could see from her expressions at Melodi Grand Prix 2011 that her landslide victory was unexpected and the greatest form of acceptance she had ever felt. And non-qualification aside,… Read more »

Africavision
Guest
Africavision

Oh and with regards to which country I think will win Eurovision some time in the next decade… It’s pretty hard to say, as we have seen countries that haven’t done well suddenly snap and win it all (like Portugal). But if previous consistency and quality could be a measure of future success, I have to say that France deserves to win Eurovision in the 2020’s. For me, every single one of France’s entries since 2015 (yes, 2015) has been amazing and top-10 worthy, and song-wise they are, for me, my favorite Eurovision country. I’d also love to see a… Read more »

Catgalliz
Guest
Catgalliz

Lovely, heartfelt piece!

Davve
Guest
Davve

The best addition isthe jury groups! Who have helped re-establish Eurovision as a hitmaker machine!

Loin dici
Guest

Maybe not really hitmakers, but certainly they’re must be one of the reasons Italy came back. Italy was gone in the year of full televoting, and came back when the juries were established again.

Jack
Guest
Jack

Despite all the drama and scandals… it’s definitely been a terrific decade for Eurovision in terms of music and entertainment plus a huge improvement on the last decade where the contest had very little credibility among the public and international press along with very predictable voting patterns(100% televoting must never be revived) the 2010s has seen lovely winners, wicked intervals, awesome stages and the growth of social media has connected the ESC fandom closer than ever with national finals gaining a huge international following. Transparency also succeeded with EBU publishing the full split 50/50 results from every country since 2014(if… Read more »

Davve
Guest
Davve

True! Juries are needed

Joe
Guest
Joe

It’s hard to think in terms of the whole decade, but for each year: 2010 – Lena, “Satellite” (Germany) 2011 – Dino Merlin, “Love in Rewind” (Bosnia and Herzegovina) 2012 – Loreen, “Euphoria” (Sweden) 2013 – Gianluca Bezzina, “Tomorrow” (Malta) 2014 – The Common Linnets, “Calm After the Storm” (The Netherlands) 2015 – Morland and Debrah Scarlett, “A Monster Like Me” (Norway) 2016 – Jamala, “1944” (Ukraine) 2017 – Salvador Sobral, “Amar pelos dois” (Portugal) 2018 – Ermal Meta and Fabrizio Moro, “Non mi avete fatto niente” (Italy) 2019 – Tied between Duncan Laurence, “Arcade” (The Netherlands – objective best… Read more »

DuncanLee
Guest
DuncanLee

Valentina Monetta will come back again with a wonderful song,then San Marino will reach the top 10.

CookyMonzta
Guest
CookyMonzta

Not if Ralph Siegel is involved.

Joe
Guest
Joe

What a great decade it’s been for Eurovision, and a massive improvement on the one before. It’s been a solid crop of winners (save for Ell and Nikki I suppose) that offered many challenges to the idea that there’s a certain “type” of song that can and can’t do well, and countries that have more or less of an advantage than others. We ended the decade in a great place, with each year better than the next. Viva Eurovision, viva international unity, and let’s get ready for the 2020s!

Joe
Guest
Joe

Of course, the best thing that happened that never got a mention was the return of San Marino, eternal fan meme and two-time qualifier.

willchriaiam
Guest
willchriaiam

It was a fun one

Idan Cohen
Guest
Idan Cohen

As an Israeli this has been one HELL OF A DECADE for Israel! 1) this decade gave us the best, most beautiful/successful Israeli-ESC songs: Milim/Rak Bishvilo for the ballad side, Toy/Golden boy for the party side 2) this is the decade where we went from absolute failure (not qualifying for 4 years) to a complete success (qualifying every year) 3) this is the decade which we won and hosted 4) Eurovision 2019 is one of the most successful in the last decades 5) Kdam died, and The Next rising star was born as a replacement 6) The 50%-mandatory-Hebrew law died,… Read more »

Joe
Guest
Joe

Israel has killed the game these last five contests. Wishing you even more success in the next decade!

Jubi
Guest

political, religious security issues and several technical mistakes during rehearsals
i don´t think 2019 “killed the gasme last five contests”

Kredential
Guest
Kredential

A few predictions on what I think countries will have in store for us next decade: – After long streaks of qualification followed by non-qualifications this year (and last year for the latter), I think Hungary and Romania will correct their mistakes and have a Sweden style redemption arc and pick up their first wins (or come very close to it). – I think Albania has found their formula and what works for them. If they continue along this path and do not stumble back into underwhelming revamp territory I think they could establish themselves as an Italy 2.0 powerhouse… Read more »

Joseph Mendy
Guest
Joseph Mendy

It’s the BBC’S fault for not putting 110% effort into the national final format, marketing, promo, etc

Mattias Sollerman
Guest
Mattias Sollerman

I thoroughly love what Eurovision as become this decade. Efter 30 years of watching it is finally an entertainment product I can enjoy with all my heart and mind.

Ieva
Guest
Ieva

I love Soldi but it would’ve been fitting to put the performance of Follia d’amore for the first one.

Joe
Guest
Joe

That song is still underrated. Should’ve won.

Jack
Guest
Jack

Madness of Love coming 2nd was such a huge surprise to everyone back in 2011, I remember being absolutely mind-blown Italy almost won on their comeback! did take a good few years for the Jazzy entry to click with me though, lovely song! Raphael, like Cesar & Tamara won jury voting but didn’t finish Top 10 on televoting. OMG imagine how crazy and wide open the voting in Dusseldorf 2011 would’ve been under the current system… Azerbaijan only winning with 405 points and Switzerland coming last with 55 points being the only grand finalists without over 100 points! audience in… Read more »

Joe
Guest
Joe

Someday, the EBU has to put out the full split results from 2010-13. It’s about time. (And hey! 2011 would’ve had the UK actually make the top ten under the new system, on the back of the Televote no less. Maybe that would’ve ended the groaning about how they can’t win bc the voters hate the UK.)

Jo.
Guest
Jo.

Predictions for the 2020’s:
– Slovakia, Luxembourg and Bulgaria return, with Turkey and Bosnia also returning but not earlier than 2025;
– Kazakhstan and Kosovo debut;
– We will get 27 or 28 in countries in the Grand Final;
– The big 3 (Sweden, Italy and Russia) will all win in this decade;
– Eurovision Asia won’t be a thing;
-Borkman and Jon Ola retire;
-London will host Eurovision, with Graham Norton, but not because the UK will win…if you know what I mean…

Joe
Guest
Joe

Valentina Monetta is gonna come back. Just you wait.

Jo.
Guest
Jo.

I said London will host the contest, but the winner…it’s open to interpretation… 😉

Also…
Serhat & Valentina for San Marino WILL happen…

Paul
Guest
Paul

Graham Norton with Rylan and Mel Giedroyc would be great! I’d feel bad for Scott Mills though!

Azaad
Guest
Azaad

Good predictions, but if Eurovision goes to London courtesy of an Australian victory, I think the supervising broadcaster would be SBS and the hosts would be Australian- maybe Graham could do a skit?

Jack
Guest
Jack

Graham Norton & Emma Willis would be the ideal hosts for UK holding ESC in the 2020s, Rylan Clark can host the Green Room, Stephen Fry will appear in sketches and while I can only dream for this to happen… Danny Boyle directing the postcards.

Diego Alberto
Guest
Diego Alberto

Spain wins for the first time since a LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONG five decades

Joe
Guest
Joe

Hey, this was the decade of long-awaited wins. 28 years for Germany, thirteen for Sweden and Denmark, forty-eight(!) for Austria, fifty-two(!! – and it was their first win ever!) for Portugal, twenty for Israel, and forty-four for the Netherlands. So never say never! If all of them can turn it around after years in the lurch, the UK and Spain might not be too far off. (Unless it’s like the 2000s and all but two years are first-time victories, which are awesome and rewarding in their own right.)

BadWoolfGirl
Guest
BadWoolfGirl

That’s what I noticed too about this decade’s crop of winners. Most of them came after a long period of time passing between wins (or in portugal’s case, debut).

Mr X
Guest
Mr X

Pero si y por supuesto con una cancion cantada en español.

Joseph Mendy
Guest
Joseph Mendy

If the UK did win Eurovision (which I hope will happen soon) I would picture it being held in Manchester at Manchester Arena with the slogan being “All in this Together”

Joseph Mendy
Guest
Joseph Mendy

In which way? Main host or Green Room host?

Azuro
Guest
Azuro

How is Israel closer to the UK than it is to Portugal, think you might wanna relook at that stat! 😀

Tajikistan
Guest
Tajikistan

They are right: Birmingham, England to Jerusalem, Israel is roughly 3,800km whilst Lisbon, Portugal to Tel Aviv, Israel is roughly 4,200km

Jubi
Guest

by road…not by plane or by the sea…

Jill Stephens
Guest
Jill Stephens

Maybe on a straight line? Seeing as Lisbon is much further West than Birmingham (but Tel Aviv is only a little bit West of Jerusalem that’s the only way it makes sense to me.

Preuss
Guest
Preuss

Italy returning and Australia competing were the best things that happened this decade!

Pinepalm
Guest
Pinepalm

Why?

Indiana07
Guest
Indiana07

Actually, neither of them gives very good songs. Only Australia 2016 and Italy 2017 are enjoyable and Francesco’s song is hood only because the lyrics, the melody is average.

Jack
Guest
Jack

tbh Italy had their worst performance this decade in 2017! Australia & Italy have been brilliant this decade with all their entries being at least enjoyable, contemporary but at times groundbreaking. dafuq you talkin about?

Indiana07
Guest
Indiana07

Australia is one of the worst countries is ESC… they get good results thanks to the jury. Italy is very overrated and does well because they get lots of points from Balkan, Malta and San Marino. In 2017, Francesco’s performance wasn’t perfect but this song was a huge fan favourite and should have won.

Frisian esc
Guest
Frisian esc

You can’t call italy overrated when they’ve literally only send their biggest domestic hits to the contest.

Lisa
Guest
Lisa

You have some problems with your tastes… italian songs were always some of the bests of every year competition, above all gualazzi Mengoni il volo meta moro gabbani and mahmood.. and all these songs have different styles so probably you don’t love italy in general

Indiana07
Guest
Indiana07

I don’t hate Italy’s songs, I’ve never thought they should be in the bottom but they’re mostly average. For example, in 2019, 2018, 2011, isn’t top five For Italy a bit too good? They should’ve been somewhere 9-16 but not top5.

KESC
Guest
KESC

Are you serious? That’s why most of their entries placed in TOP 10 and higher.

Polegend Godgarina
Guest

also the 2010s produced euphoria, the biggest eurovision commercial smash since…ooh ahh just a little bit in 1996 i guess?

Darren
Guest
Darren

This decade saw the dilution of the bloc vote effect, with countries winning or breaking top 10 which Really shouldn’t have. This decade saw a return to form, with more traditional countries like Germany, Sweden, Denmark, Austria winning once more. The songs also improved. We still get the joke/novelty entry however, most countries have upped their game and take it seriously, by actually entering songs that could chart outside Eurovision. Compared to the late 00s which felt dominated by joke/novelty acts. A downside of this decade (the 10s) was a lot of the winners won politically or more importantly social… Read more »

Jack
Guest
Jack

Very well said, completely agree and you hit all the nails about 2010s ESC and I hope we’ll steer away from political correctness in the 2020s. I can see Liechtenstain & Kazakhstan debuting very soon and I seriously hope UK will start getting a good run of results following a decade without a Top 10 finish, Netherlands went through same thing in 2000s and after 8 NQs they realized internal selections are the way to go.

Joe
Guest
Joe

The UK tried that but they internally selected the wrong artists. They need an Anouk or a Waylon who aren’t afraid of what it might do to their reputation, or a talented newcomer like Duncan.

Joseph Mendy
Guest
Joseph Mendy

You’re not alone when it comes to hoping that the UK gets a better result soon

hi guys
Guest
hi guys

And eurovision became more gay

Darren
Guest
Darren

Seemingly just to annoy Russia though. This decade, it seemed a lot of decisions and victories was to simply annoy Russia. And they say ESC isn’t political….

Jo.
Guest
Jo.

Russia also knows how to annoy people, so I guess we are all even.

Dragoo
Guest
Dragoo

And we absolutely like it!

Frisian esc
Guest
Frisian esc

Israel was a bit too over the top this year though, with that dana international kiss cam performance and when assi azar made miki uncomfortable with that half naked pic of him.

James
Guest
James

That part about Miki’s picture was in the script and he knew about it ahead as part of the skit. With Assi.

Rockfan
Guest
Rockfan

Azar was not a good host. I agree, he did too many such things

Rockfan
Guest
Rockfan

@Dragoo: Speak for yourself. ESC is about music, not sexuality

Graph
Guest
Graph

The countries who do the best at Eurovision are the countries with the least interest in the gay aspect of Eurovision.

Rockfan
Guest
Rockfan

@Graph: Good point

Rockfan
Guest
Rockfan

More gay? Just because Conchita won? I rather say it added fuel to the silly stereoypes about “ESC being gay”. Which it is not! It’s for everyone

Azaad
Guest
Azaad

On the whole I’m going to say most of the changes were for the better.