MELODI GRAND PRIX 2020 SEMI 4

Three down, two more to go! The fourth semi-final in Norway’s expanded Melodi Grand Prix 2020 is set for Saturday 1 February.

Once more, four acts will compete for one highly coveted spot in the grand final. But which of the four entries is your favourite? Who should represent western Norway in the next stage of MGP 2020?

You can listen to all four entries below and then vote for your favourite. You can pick as many acts as you like, but you can only vote once. So choose wisely!

Melodi Grand Prix 2020 — Semi-Final Four Songs

Hege Bjerk – “Pang”

Hege Bjerk (29) comes from Sandness. After studying music in both Oslo and Copenhagen, she released her debut album “Alt me drømme om”. She sings her music in the Jærsk language, which is a dialect spoken in the traditional district of Jæren in the Rogaland county. Her entry “Pang” is about how an eating disorder can control one’s life.

Lyrics and music: Martin Bjerkreim, Trygve Stakkeland and Hege Bjerkreim

Magnus Bokn – “Over the Sea”

Magnus Bokn (25) hails from Stavanger and has been involved in music since he was fourteen years old. In the past, he took part in both Idol and The Voice as well as singing in several bands. Combining his studies in popular music with his singing career, he decided to take part in this year’s Melodi Grand Prix. His song “Over the Sea” is co-written by two recent MGP winners — JOWST and Alexander Rybak.

Lyrics and music: Alexander Rybak, Joakim With Steen and Magnus Bokn

Nordic Tenors – “In This Special Place”

Nordic Tenors are an opera trio, who formed in Bergen, Norway’s second city, in 2003. The goal of creating the Nordic Tenors was to create a classical group that combines “classical and opera music with popular music expressions and humor”. The group has a well-established career in Norway and has performed over 900 concerts and recorded eight albums. Their entry “In This Special Place” is indeed a combination of opera and pop and reminds us slightly of Didrik Solli-Tangen’s “My Heart is Yours” that won MGP in 2010.

Lyrics and music: Einar Kristiansen Five and Jan-Tore Saltnes

Oda Loves You – “Love Who We Love”

Oda Evjen Gjøvåg (31) grew up in Bergen, but moved to the world’s creative capital Los Angeles at nineteen. After seven years, she returned to Norway with a “bag full of new experiences” and better songwriting capabilities. With her partially self-penned song “Love Who We Love”, Oda hopes to spread love through music.

Lyrics and music: Magnus Bertelsen and Oda Evjen Gjøvåg

Poll: Who should win semi-final four of Norway’s Melodi Grand Prix 2020?

What is your favourite song? Is there a winner in the mix? Let us know in the comments.

Read more Norway Eurovision 2020 news here

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Wave
Wave
9 months ago

It was in 2006, “Alvedansen”:)

Anita
Anita
9 months ago

I am team “Over the Sea” here.
it reminds me a bit of the try Sebalter had last year, although I liked his song better

bastian
bastian
9 months ago

I love Over the sea. Could do really well in esc i believe 🙂 Great voice aswell

Polegend Godgarina
9 months ago

i like pang best but they should rihmove those distorted noises at the end of the choruses from the instrumental

Lolek
Lolek
9 months ago

I don’t know if that’s true, but the most recent swedish language melo winners (Which was quite a while ago – 2006 with Carola if I’m not mistaken) did translate their songs to english. It might be a strategic choice, otherwise I would find it weird to force an artist to translate the song into english.

Lolek
Lolek
9 months ago

Oda Loves You has grown on me so I voted for her. However I quite enjoy Hege’s dialect and the song is nice. I wouldn’t be unhappy if either of them go through.

Megxit over
Megxit over
9 months ago

Jærsk is not a language, it’s a dialect close to New Norwegian

Wave
Wave
9 months ago
Reply to  Megxit over

For those Who Know Little About The Norwegian language history i would like to point out that “New Norwegian” (Nynorsk) has much more in common to “Old Norwegian” (norrønt) that The more widely used “Book language” (Bokmål).

F@b
9 months ago

What a masterpiece ! Oda loves you, I love you!

Brooklyn
Brooklyn
9 months ago

PANG