The Wiwi Jury — our in-house panel of music unprofessionals — continues to rate and review the 41 songs that had been selected for Eurovision 2020. Next up, we take a look at the winner of Georgia‘s artist selection Georgian Idol Tornike Kipiani and his internally selected song “Take Me As I Am”. Read on to see if indeed we did!

Tornike Kipiani – “Take Me As I Am”

“Take Me As I Am” reviews

Luis: Are three minutes of Tornike Kipiani and his backing vocalists belting out enough? No, they are not, of course they are not. The grit, the aggressiveness, the boldness of this song are addictive. Georgia manages to make you forget about any other thing in this world while it’s on, and when it ends, it leaves a kind of void which can only be filled by another play.

Score: 9

Antranig: Rarely have I heard a Eurovision song quite this dreadful. To me as a writer, lyrics are of utmost importance in a song. They don’t need to be amazing but they need to achieve something. Lyrically, the only thing “Take Me As I Am” achieves is delivering an insult to the English language. Sure, Tornike is a great singer but that’s a moot point when singing a song so dire. This is beyond abysmal.

Score: 1

William: Before listening to “Take Me As I Am”, I’d never wondered whether Tornike dances like a Spaniard or dresses like an Italian. But after listening to his unique swerve on old school rock, I definitely want to hear him sing like a Georgian. The video is black and white, but the song moves through many more moods and textures: languid rock verses, a more assertive pre-chorus and an explosive chorus where pained screams carry a strange beauty. The message — that we should be loved for who we are rather than what’s en vogue — reverberates across borders and time. This is three minutes well spent.

Score: 7

Sebastian: Despite my efforts to find something enjoyable about this composition, it just doesn’t work. Tornike’s simple message — take him has he is — comes across as teenage angst written for a high school assignment. Tornike’s lyrics tell us to not put expectations of who he should be as a Georgian, but they poorly come across as a derivative of stereotype when referencing the men of other European cultures (i.e. all Italians dress well, all Spanish men dance), defeating the point of the song. To then have Spanish/Italian lyrics of “Te quiero, te amo”, is just baffling. At least Tornike can sing! It’s just unfortunate this is song should be relegated to the abyss of any music streaming service.

Score: 1

Robyn: Tornike’s message is strong and clear — take him as he is. The Georgian Idol winner’s song is a defiant anthem of being true to yourself. When some people consider their own country’s culture inferior to that of others (in New Zealand, we call it the cultural cringe), Tornike makes it clear that he doesn’t need to “talk like an Englishman” or “smell like a French homme”. Likewise, the song doesn’t attempt to comply with Eurovision-friendly genres, instead serving up a grungy rock tune to get the message across.

Score: 8

Tornike Kipiani – “Take Me As I Am” rankings

In the Wiwi Jury we have 22 jurors but only have room for five reviews. The remaining scores are below:

Angus: 2

Åri: 8

Barnabas: 6

Bernardo: 3.5

Calvin: 4.5

Deban: 6.5

Esma: 6

Florian: 4.5

Jonathan: 6

Lucy: 2.5

Natalie: 7

Oliver: 4.5

Pablo: 5.5

Renske: 6.5

Ron: 4

Tobias: 3

Tom: 5

We have removed the highest and lowest scores prior to calculating the average. This is to remove outliers and potential bias. We have removed a low of 1 and a high of 9.

Wiwi Jury verdict: 5/10

What do you think of this song? Share your own score and review below!

See all our Eurovision 2020 reviews and rankings

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
83 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Josh Sterling
Josh Sterling
2 months ago

I will give a 9.25/10 for this

ESCFan2009
ESCFan2009
2 months ago

Georgia – 1/10 (41st/41)

keith mawson
keith mawson
2 months ago

Amazing one of the best songs this year.

Zelenovi
Zelenovi
2 months ago

Georgia has sent some of the most creative acts and best vocalists to the contest of any country, so let’s focus on those and forget this ever happened.

I don’t want to be mean, but honestly the lyrics are literally just a repetition of lazy European stereotypes. I’m just glad we won’t have to witness this ending higher than Iriao did, who had perfect polyphonic harmonies and sheer poetry as lyrics.

Colin
Colin
2 months ago

GEORGIA –You just must appreciate Georgian boldness and authenticity. This song is about that; a guy who wants to keep his identity. That sentiment is very relatable, but the way song presents it feels somewhat underwhelming. Using ”positive stereotypes” of other nations leaves several interpretations of it’s goal, but I will ”take it as it is” and say it comes off as teen angst way more than it should. These simple lyrics just clash with his raw, almost aggressive delivery. I like that they are exploring musical realms, but I wish that vocal powerhouse Tornike returns with a song which… Read more »

Héctor
Héctor
2 months ago

I didn’t know what to expect from Georgia, the description got my hyped but it could go either way. Well, while it hasn’t been a masterpiece or what I would have loved, “Take Me as I Am” is very original and fresh in Eurovision. It’s not for everyone, I’m aware, but we can’t expect every single entry to be poppy to appeal the basic audience. So, while I don’t necessarily love this, I think it is bringing something different and original and I have to love that. So kudos to Georgia for always trying (you deserved better last year btw).… Read more »

eurovisionaire
eurovisionaire
2 months ago

I agree with Sebastian and Antranig

EuroSluuuuuutty
EuroSluuuuuutty
2 months ago

The song ain’t all that but he looks the dominant Arab top i’d go on a Grindr date with

Timi
Timi
2 months ago

Bad taste. XD

Ag89
Ag89
2 months ago

Wiwi, why don’t you publish all comments? Are you using some filters or what? Why don’t you love us? Not ok. 🙂
Jokes on side, but I really want to know.

Polegend Godgarina
2 months ago
Reply to  Ag89

i believe they all agree beforehand on who writes a comment on which songs while the rest just send in their score

SpirK
SpirK
2 months ago

I really like this one but I acknowledge it’s not everyone’s cup of tea. I liked it since first listen, when I knew I heard something interesting that wanted to hear again. A solid 8/10 from me and my 5th place. I would’ve loved to see this in the final and I think it had it’s chances. A placing from 8-12 in the semi would’ve been logical. Wouldn’t cross out it placing like 5th and being a shock afterwards. It would depend on staging of this and the other semi 2 songs. We’ll never know now, but what we know… Read more »

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago

God I’m so done with Antranig. Just leave already.

sam
sam
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

and of course he gave armenia an 8

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  sam

I love both and think both would and should have 100% qualified. But Antranig can have his opinion, though he should know, if he’s reading this, that he is saying his opinion in a truly disgusting way. Attacking an artist and their team is never the way to critique a song, and if he had any decency he would know that. And there is a very profound message in the song, of being forced by society to conform when everyone just needs to be themselves; to adopt Western ideals to be accepted by modern European society therefore changing their culture;… Read more »

Héctor
Héctor
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

He just loves divas, it doesn’t matter a ballad or a bop, and strongly disapproves any other entries. It has been like that for years. He doesn’t have any credibility at all and he’s also very predictable; when he gave CZ Rep. a 2/10, I said he would give the Armenia diva a score of 8 or higher and the rest is history…

Btw, I agree on your interpretation of the message.

sam
sam
2 months ago

seriously? a 5? and australia got what.. a high 7? tornike is daddy and take me as i am is art. my second place

Jay
Jay
2 months ago
Reply to  sam

Mine too

Colin
Colin
2 months ago

I’ll be honest and say that I don’t know how to rate this song. I don’t think I like it for being unpleasant and lazily written, but then again I respect it’s authenticity. I have a feeling the lyrics are deliberately lazy and simple in a sign of a protest. Georgia always sends very unique songs (even in Georgian language) and usually don’t tend to qualify. This is probably a ”diss track” to The Big Five and ESC to say that they will ”accommodate” to their standards by singing in English but by their own standards. I think this song… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
2 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Sorry, Colin, but I don’t understand your take on this. Since when is singing in English a standard the Big 5 are requesting and the others need to accommodate? 4 out of the Big Five are singing mostly if not always in their native language, so this reading seems really twisted to me. As a consequence I cannot see how these lyrics are fuelled by anger and spite? Towards whom?

Colin
Colin
2 months ago
Reply to  Tibor

I think he is using the examples of Big Five as representatives of bigger picture uniformity of songs, which often includes Anglicization of the lyrics for the smaller nations. Maybe I haven’t formulated it well, but I see the simplified English lyrics as a sign of a protest of not embracing songs with much more layered lyrics in Georgian from the last two years. As for the sentiment it produces, I really feel the song is angry. Seemingly towards his girlfriend, but I see her as an avatar for civilizations ”trying to absorb and nullify” (at least figuratively) smaller nations.… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
2 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Well, leaving aside that I don’t really know what “national authenticity” would be, I don’t get how his repeated declaration of love in several languages would fit into your interpretation. If he is talking as a Georgian singer to the Big 5 and seeing them somehow as cultural oppressors (which, as I explained, would be really strange, because the Big 5 are with the exception of Germany almost always singing in their languages), I don’t know why he would then declare his love towards said oppressors. If on the other hand you read the lyrics on a personal level (a… Read more »

Colin
Colin
2 months ago
Reply to  Tibor

Honestly, the chorus back-vocal lyrics confuse me so much. I can’t tell if that’s just echoing his sentiments (as in, I accept you, but you don’t accept me) or are they a response from the same girlfriend, who uses (hypocritical) declarations of love in (inauthentic to her) languages. I tried to explain it many times and still don’t know. It’s just one of the reasons why rating this presents an issue. As for political undertones, this song mentions other nations in a comparative way and toys with authenticity (including national language and customs). After several other entries, like Warrior and… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
2 months ago
Reply to  Colin

I don’t see a reason for confusion, if you’re staying on the personal level. He is saying: Accept me, don’t force me to be someone I’m not. Love me as I love you. If it helps, I’m telling you this in different languages.
And why do you think every Georgian entry needs to have some political undertone? They’re different artists (and presumably different songwriters), can’t one have a political undertone and the next one doesn’t?

Colin
Colin
2 months ago
Reply to  Tibor

I am actually hoping to read this wrong, but this song feels like a much more obvious candidate for a political message than Warrior or Keep the Faith and I am starting to have bad deja-vus. If we leave it just on a personal level, I still think it feels a bit immature and too simplified, but much less toxic. I could go with it. I hope that’s how it actually is. I really do.

Tibor
Tibor
2 months ago
Reply to  Colin

To be honest, I don’t remember the lyrics of “Warrior” or “Keep the Faith”, but basically I just don’t see a reason why I would look for something political in a song, just because it comes from a certain country. And I can’t see why it is immature to tell someone you love, that you want them to love you for who you are, not for who they’d rather want you to be. I agree that the lyrics are simple, but not even poetry is always complicated and layered and imbued with hidden meaning, why would lyrics be?

Colin
Colin
2 months ago
Reply to  Tibor

While they certainly could be interpreted ”as they are”, they are so simple that seeing the hidden meaning needs no much effort. Again, I don’t think that the song *has* to have political meaning (and I prefer it if it does not unless it’s especially strong and emotional), there is a ”fool me once” feeling here. At least four different songs from the last decade coming from Georgia are *confirmed* to be politically toned (two of which are said to be such only after the contest). Thus, any subliminal meaning one could possibly take even if this song comes any… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
2 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Let me try it this way: It’s not about being wrong or right, when it comes to interpretation. But an interpretation needs to make sense in itself. And the hostile political interpretation you gave in your first post just doesn’t fit with the declaration of love the lyrics repeatedly make. You can’t just ignore a central element of a text, if it contradicts your interpretation. You have to see a text in its integrality, otherwise you just pick and choose and force pre-existing meaning onto it. It seems a little strange to do this and then go and criticize the… Read more »

Colin
Colin
2 months ago
Reply to  Tibor

”But an interpretation needs to make sense in itself. And the hostile political interpretation you gave in your first post just doesn’t fit with the declaration of love the lyrics repeatedly make. You can’t just ignore a central element of a text if it contradicts your interpretation.” As I tried to explain before, I can see it as a ”response” from his girlfriend who is either from the ”absorbing culture” or ”already assimilated” who is falsely pretending to love him to lure him into submission and changing himself. Is that interpretation wrong? Quite possibly. It is completely ludicrous if we… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
2 months ago
Reply to  Colin

I can only speak for myself and you’re not upsetting me . 🙂
And now I got what you meant. If you read it like this, it’s still not a “diss track” to another country, but it stays on the personal level and talks about a relationship between two people one of whom doesn’t think the other is cultivated enough, because he’s not “international” enough. That indeed makes sense. But then it’s not about spite, is it? It could be about a certain kind of anger, though.

Colin
Colin
2 months ago
Reply to  Tibor

I’m glad if I didn’t come off as too brash, because last thing I want is to accidentally get into a quarrel. I respect each of your interpretations and reviews. It’s just that I feel a certain clash here. I’ll do my proper review based on the assumption there is no subliminal meaning here. If this means anything, whether it ended-up in huge love, a dislike or anything in between, there’s always been a certain process of me analysing Georgian entries. Kudos on always thinking outside of the box. That said, all the best to Tornike and Georgia next year.… Read more »

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
2 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Well, thanks both. You covered so many angles that I don’t need to write anything. 😛

ag89
ag89
2 months ago

Antranig, as a writer, should have understood the reality this song is trying to present. Provoked enough by lyrics about “positive-stereotypical” men from “regular” western nations?! Offended by being portrayed through positive stereotype?! There we go, now you understand Georgians.This is exactly what this song is trying to do in order help all of us in understanding how Georgians, or pretty much any nation in the European east or south-east, feel when portrayed through negative stereotypes. Actually, I am really happy to see how people get angry when they hear this: it means they partially get it despite they still… Read more »

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  ag89

Please explain to me how this song uses positive stereotypes, I am genuinely interested to read why you think this song is positive.

ag89
ag89
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

What does come across your mind when you read “dress like an Italian”? You need exactly one second or less, to get an answer. It is a positive answer. You don’t even think about it. I do not have to think about it: when I hear this particular line, I have an image of a nice, good looking man. Or a woman. Or a Spanish guy? Passion, power, great moves, good looks. We are now in that mode where our brains work instantly once we hear words or names of particular nations. We have either positive, neutral or negative image… Read more »

sam
sam
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

because it’s talking about the struggle of being an easterner in a world where western customs are “normal.” he wants to be himself and not conform to the societal expectations put upon him

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  sam

Your comment may be right, but my question was why is what Tornike is saying about the Big Five a positive stereotype?

Ag89
Ag89
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

I wrote you a very long answer, but Wiwi hasn’t published it (yet).

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

All of it Kosey!! He’s saying essentially that Englishmen dance well, French people always smell good, and et cetera. Read the lyrics, they are all positive things. He just doesn’t want to be boxed into that since he is good at different things and is not the same.

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

Hi Ashton, I disagree with you on this one. Propagating stereotypes is never a good idea. He might have said he is proud of his heterosexual, white roots and therefore would it be acceptable for him to sing, “Why do you want me to be really emotional like a gay person, or why do you want me to have a big dick like a black person?” They are both saying positive things about the other person, but are they really “positive” or do they just fuel more hatred and misunderstanding? The amount of anti-English language sentiment I see on here… Read more »

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

And play like a German either means they are more competent than other countries, or more aggressive in starting world wars, neither of which are good.

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

As for the Italians, Spanish and French, well at least they dress nice, dance nice and smell nice – doesn’t say much for them does it?

See what I mean?

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

So if your stereotype was ‘you are beautiful’ or ‘you can dance well’ then you would be upset. Sure. And the anti-English language sentiment is well-deserved. Eurovision should not be about representing only one language. It should be about cultural identity. And everybody should be proud of themselves no matter what race, no matter what sexuality. You are essentially gatekeeping someone from expressing themselves.

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

I do get that stereotypes are bad but it’s not as if he’s saying ‘French people are stuck-up’, ‘all Germans are Neo-Nazis’ or stuff like that, is it?

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

Then you are underestimating the real impact that even the smallest of prejudices result in.

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

I don’t disagree that everyone should be proud of who they are. But why can’t that be an internal proudness driven from within? Why does it have to be at the expense of someone else?

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

Because it is told in a story format. It is told from the viewpoint of a man who is being forced to be something he is not. In his anger towards not being accepted, he targets others and laments the fact that he will never be as good as them in the eyes of the person the song is directed towards. And can I just say, Tornike isn’t saying that gay people are over-emotional or that black men have large genitalia, is he? He is using much less harmful stereotypes. And by the way, not that you need to know,… Read more »

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

That is really sad.
It makes me wonder, given your experience, why you like a song as nasty as this?
When you say that he won’t be as good at speaking English as an English man, isn’t that obvious if it is not his native language? I wouldn’t expect to be as good as a Georgian native at speaking Georgian. Therefore, I can only take it that he is attacking the English language itself. Which is mean and totally unnecessary.

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

Also, it makes me wonder why Tornike wants to be with this woman when she is a total idiot? Maybe she has a nice ass and she cooks his meals nicely?

ag89
ag89
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

@Kosey, you are taking this song too literally: you just don’t get it and that’s ok.

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  ag89

I might not get what others get from it, but I’m entitled to interpret what I believe is there in the song.

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

I’m sorry, did you seriously just compare being tormented for my body shape to a singer complimenting French people on how good they smell?? Shame on you.

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

No, I didn’t compare them. Shame on you for suggesting I did!

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

You said that it made you wonder, given my experience, why I like a song as apparently nasty as this. That’s comparing or at least a very large insinuation if I have ever heard one.

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

No, it’s not a comparison, that means to assume they are of the same level, which I in no way insinuated thank you. My point was, if you are someone who has been through people giving abuse to you, why would you like a song that that is nasty to other people? One might be 100% and the other might be 1%, but why would you even support the 1% – I don’t understand it.

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

Because the song isn’t nasty!! I really don’t understand how you can view the song as, of all the absurd things, an attack on the English language? But I suppose we won’t agree on this, and that’s fine. I do kind of love how we have the opportunity to engage in thought-provoking discussions like this because of Eurovision. I will think more about the harm of stereotypes, even if I don’t see it in this song, and I hope you came away with something too. In any case, it’s been a pleasure chatting. 🙂

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

Fair enough Ashton, we can definitely agree that this is a great place to exchange views! I will certainly think about my language (no pun intended!) so as not to cause offence – I was bullied a lot as a teenager so I in no way wanted to underplay the seriousness of the abuse you have suffered – I know how much that stuff can impact people. So I’ll think carefully about what impression I am giving in my posts.

Until the next time!

Emily
Emily
2 months ago

Songs like this are rather difficult for me to place. On one hand I think Tornike has a great voice that I would listen to over and over again, but the song itself is rather on the ‘blah’ side, and for me the I love yous in different languages jars me for some reason? Nothing warrants a 1/10 for me, but I’m not sure if I can put it anywhere past a 4.

Idksmth
Idksmth
2 months ago

To me this is a bit more international version of “Sul Tsin Iare” because it’s in English. A male singer with a voice that is raspy and has big range but the difference is the song. For me, this song is 3 minutes of Tornike and his backing vocalists belting it out to the fullest to the point it becomes monotonous. The basic lyrics don’t help either. Bonus points because it seems as a great fit for Tornike, so I see raw emotions and authenticity in this song. Since we all know that sadly we won’t see any of the… Read more »

Dawid
Dawid
2 months ago

Georgia:
Top5: “Is it a personal attack or something?”

Jo.
Jo.
2 months ago

It’s nice but it could’ve been great. The lyrics are the issue, imo.

Escvegi
Escvegi
2 months ago

My guilty pleasure <3 7/10

Odysseas
Odysseas
2 months ago

The most underrated song of the year… Absolutely amazing vocals by Tornike and the backing vocalists. This song delivers a diachronic message of being yourself through the simplest lyrics. I can’t see anything wrong with this song
Overall:7.5/10 (18th)

JONAS
JONAS
2 months ago

I actually like it! Would definitely be on my Top 10 list. Agree on the lyrics (poor), but the Twin Peaks feeling compensates!

Skiwalko
Skiwalko
2 months ago
Reply to  JONAS

I don’t really see anything Twin Peaks about this song, neither in the music nor in the vibe. If anything, this song is the opposite of “Twin Peaks”‘ main theme.

JONAS
JONAS
2 months ago
Reply to  Skiwalko

The beginning creates Twin Peaks vibes (at least to my ears) – and then it releases the drama below the surface – just like – well, Twin Peaks!

Skiwalko
Skiwalko
2 months ago
Reply to  JONAS

I still don’t see it, but I’m happy that you do. 🙂 If we’re looking for lynchian comparisons, then the drama beneath the surface sounds a lot like “Blue Velvet”, “Eraserhead” shares the cold, eery black and white aesthetic of the video and “Mulholland Drive” features a song with words “te quiero” in it.

mr 305 # dale
mr 305 # dale
2 months ago

thanks to the other aussies who realise this is actually bad english lol

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago

38. Georgia – 3.5/10 – It is through songs like this that I realize just how much of a lyrics and emotions person I am. I am a big fan of guitar music outside of Eurovision and so I really appreciate the industrial guitar sound in this entry which evokes memories of early 2000s nu-metal (Chester Bennington, RIP). This song by rights should be high on my list but it is however completely spoiled by the nasty tone in the lyrics. They are jarring and openly stereotypical which actually makes me quite angry (and not in the way the song… Read more »

Colin
Colin
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

So, is Georgia then one of the two songs you were mentioning as your bottom ones yet to come? I have very mixed feelings about this song. Personally, I wasn’t referring to Georgia when mentioning ”a song which has to be in my bottom 3”, but I still find a lot to criticize here.

Kosey
Kosey
2 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Georgia is sitting just outside my bottom 3 – there are still
2 songs further down my list (although reading this thread has maybe made me think I should have scored it lower, lol!). As I said in my review, the sound is actually closer to things I like outside of Eurovision, but I just can’t deal with the negative vibes in the lyrics. I’ve read your thread with Tibor, and I tend to agree with you that there is something deeper going on here which leaves a sour taste in my mouth.

Colin
Colin
2 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

One thing I admire Georgia is that each year they come-up with a song that it’s very hard to rate and very easy to provoke discussions (I am certain this is among the highest numbers of responses of a jury score article). I think Waterfall was their last conventional entry and I respect them going outside of the box. Now, I thought a lot about my conversation with Tibor and I think both possibilities are not out of the question. This might be very straightforward or meant with a double meaning. Both is possible. However, I believe that lyrically it… Read more »

Mia
Mia
2 months ago

I like this entry, it could my favorite grower song. Georgia are not afraid to take risks and manages to be edgy without being cringey 🙂 I’m living for intro in the song and chorus afterwards, it’s amazing! With its controversial lyrics and Tornike’s voice this is clearly stand out entry and it wouldn’t surprise me to be qualifier. Too bad we won’t see the staging, but I’m glad Georgia chose him again.
8,5/10

Tibor
Tibor
2 months ago

“Take me as I am” is one of the few entries this year I actually listen to – occasionally, but still, I really like this. I’m not that much into rock music as a whole, so I’m grateful to Tornike Kipiani that he didn’t go for some guitar heavy, noisy chorus – which would have been the predictable thing to do. Instead he’s opting for highlighting the vocal arrangement. In my opinion that’s a great choice because that’s what pulls this whole song out of the ordinary. Many people have issues with the lyrics, I don’t, I think they’re simple… Read more »

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  Tibor

Hahaha, finally we agree!

Tibor
Tibor
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

Okay, if you say so … You see me slightly puzzled, I wasn’t aware that we were disagreeing on everything else.

Ashton
Ashton
2 months ago
Reply to  Tibor

Nah, I just haven’t commented, but I’ve disagreed with you on nearly every other song.

Tibor
Tibor
2 months ago
Reply to  Ashton

I see. You should have commented, what else is disagreement good for? I don’t take it personally, if someone doesn’t share my views.

Skiwalko
Skiwalko
2 months ago

I respect this entry for what it represents – originality, uniqueness, staying true to yourself and your style. Almost every year, Georgia select an entry that’s bold and different, for better (“Midnight Gold”) or worse (“For You”), and I don’t want them to ever change that. I think that Eurovision needs more diversity, and it’s really necessary to have songs like “Take Me As I Am” in the competition. The problem is… that I don’t care for the song all that much. From the production standpoint it’s pretty great, Tornike’s voice is awesome and the idea behind the lyrics is… Read more »

Briekimchi
Briekimchi
2 months ago

Low of 1, high of 9. Average rating = 5. That is why Georgia were going to be a surprise qualifier. Some people hate this but just as many love it for how different it is and how much it stands out. It’s in the middle of my ranking because it is not my cup of tea but it is much more interesting than the middle-of-the-road, who cares entries that I tend to put towards the bottom of my ranking. Love Tornike’s voice (even though I preferred his 2017 song) and am really excited to see what he comes up… Read more »

Thanos
Thanos
2 months ago

Although my preferred genre of music is rock and especially classic rock, I just don’t seem to get into the song since I don’t really find the lyrics interesting. Nevertheless he has a very good voice and I believe that he has tremendous potential to deliver to us a much better rock song next year. 5-6/10, I overall agree with the wiwi jury on this

Hipp
Hipp
2 months ago
Reply to  Thanos

Maybe you don’t like it because you like classic rock, I think this has grunge rock and alternative metal influences.

Thanos
Thanos
2 months ago
Reply to  Hipp

It’s an interesting mix of some rock subgenres I must admit. It also has some dubstep influences in some parts I believe