One month ago, the EBU confirmed that while Junior Eurovision 2020 would be hosted in Warsaw, the competing performances would be recorded remotely in the competitors’ home country. Now specifications have been revealed of the standard stage design that each delegation will use.

The details were shared by Spanish broadcaster RTVE, who released the documentation as part of a call for tenders from companies who could supply the LED technology for the set.

Junior Eurovision 2020 stage specifications

The specifications include a diagram which shows the layout of the performance space. It involves an overall space measuring 18m by 20m. Inside that is a circular area with a diameter of 14m. Curved around the back of the circle is an LED wall measuring 4.5m tall and 13.64m across.

 

RTVE is looking for a supplier who can rent them three components: the large curved LED screen, a floor LED screen and a spherical LED screen.

The Spanish broadcaster’s documents only detail the LED equipment, but it is expected that the full specifications for Junior Eurovision 2020 will include other requirements such as lighting and cameras.

RTVE plans to record their Junior Eurovision performance later in the month in their Madrid studios. The technical set-up will be done on 19 October, rehearsals and filming on 20 October and deconstruction of the stage 21 October. RTVE is looking to spend around €16,700 on the staging.

It is not known whether other Junior Eurovision broadcasters will have to stick to the same timetable or budget.

The uniform stage design and technical set-up has been designed to ensure that there will be a level playing-field for all 13 competing countries. While broadcasters will all record their Junior Eurovision performances in their own studio, the performance spaces will ensure all delegations are working with the same resources.

The situation is similar to what Eurovision 2021 delegations may face if the Rotterdam show uses Scenario C (some countries perform remotely) or Scenario D (all countries perform remotely).

Who is participating at Junior Eurovision 2020?

Thirteen countries have been confirmed for Junior Eurovision 2020: Armenia, Belarus, France, Georgia, Germany, Kazakhstan, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Serbia and Spain. Of those, nine countries have already selected the artist and song that they will enter into the contest this year.

Concerns around the Covid-19 pandemic have meant that seven broadcasters who regularly enter are taking 2020 off. The EBU has said that they will consider late entries from any broadcasters who might have a change of heart. However, to date, no additional countries have joined the 2020 lineup.

What do you think of the Junior Eurovision 2020 stage design? How will delegations use the space? Would this type of design work for Eurovision 2021? Tell us your thoughts below!

Read more Junior Eurovision 2020 news here

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Kaden
Kaden
21 days ago

I think the Polish broadcaster could have made a stage that can be transportated (by lorry) to each country together with a production team. In order to keep it covid secure, keep away from the contestants and have at least 3 days between each recording. Would have made a much cheaper and made it look better I think

Ed ed
Ed ed
23 days ago

The question is – can all countries afford it?

Whisker
Whisker
23 days ago
Reply to  Ed ed

Right. I don’t know what it was like under normal circumstances, I reckon it’s the same as inthe big ESC, where as far as I know the organizing broadcaster carries the biggest financial burden (they get sponsors tho or is it EBU who gets the sponsors?) and then participating broadcasters contribute with their participation fee and pay for their own delegations? Maybe the broadcasters get sponsorships anyway?

Sabrina
Sabrina
23 days ago
Reply to  Ed ed

Don’t know why you were downvoted, because it’s a valid question. Not every broadcaster has the same budget and I imagine the Junior Eurovision one is usually low. But I assume Whisker is right and EBU does something to help, or at least has an agreement with the participating countries about how much they can handle. Another question is how hard it may be to some of them to get a curved LED, since it’s not the kind of thing you buy to use just one time.

Neil
Neil
24 days ago

Wow lots of LEDs. The Stage KINDA reminds me of Germany 2011 stage and
I liked that stage a lot. Will Solea need all of those LEDs, I don’t think so, but at least
the stage looks pretty

beccaboo1212
24 days ago

Looks great! However, I’m still anxious about Italy.

Cameron
Cameron
24 days ago
Reply to  beccaboo1212

Italy withdrew

Alex
Alex
23 days ago
Reply to  Cameron

Yes but they might revert that decision.

Cameron
Cameron
22 days ago
Reply to  Alex

Oh ok, hopefully they do

Mariko
Mariko
24 days ago

Oh I thought they would preform live in their own countries, but it’s prerecorded?

James
James
23 days ago

I can imagine the huge logistical nightmare producers will have with switching from one broadcast studios in one country to another in between live performances.

Sabrina
Sabrina
23 days ago

Another thing that tends to level the field is that there will be way less pressure over the children performing, assuming they’ll have all the takes the need to get it perfect.

Asaf Rokni
Asaf Rokni
24 days ago

There is a mistake, 1800cm is not 1.8m… it is 18m…
I’m pretty sure the stage won’t be 2 meters on 2 meters lol

DJddog5
DJddog5
23 days ago
Reply to  Asaf Rokni

It is “Junior” after all lol (Ok done with my bad pun)