Eurovision Winners 1950s

This year at wiwibloggs we are celebrating the festive season with a series of different polls. For the next few days, we’re going to stuff your stockings with a selection of Eurovision votes. Consider this a unique riff on the classic “Twelve Days of Christmas” carol.

Whether you celebrate Christmas or not, you can join us and let us know your thoughts for each and every poll. Today’s question — Who is your favourite Eurovision winner of the 1950s?

Eurovision winners: 1956 to 1959

The 1950s were, of course, when it all began. Eurovision was first held in 1956, with hosts Switzerland emerging victorious. And, except for a pandemic-shaped gap in 2020, the contest has never looked back. The Netherlands dominated Eurovision’s brief run in the 1950s, winning twice. France also notched up its first win.

But who was your favourite winner from the 1950s? Watch and listen to all the performances below and then vote for your favourite in our poll.

1956: Lys Assia — “Refrain” (Switzerland)

1957: Corry Brokken — “Net als toen” (The Netherlands)

1958: André Claveau — “Dors, mon amour” (France)

1959: Teddy Scholten — “Een beetje” (The Netherlands)

Poll: Who is your favourite Eurovision winner of the 1950s?

Check out more of our polls here.

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Jo.
Jo.
7 months ago

1959 is charming, but I’m not really into any of these. The 60’s were much more enjoyable imo.

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
7 months ago

1959 was a sparkling performance, no doubt. But, there is something very special about the very first winner in 1956; that very short piece of music just evokes so much resonance for me. I’m split between 1959 and 1956.

PP77
PP77
7 months ago

1.1959
2.1956
3.1957
4.1958

Sabrina
Sabrina
7 months ago

I have a huge soft spot for “Een Beetje”, because it sounds like something that could be in Mary Poppins or any movie like that. Also, it’s probably the first winner to “break the mold” in Eurovision. The first to do that should have been “Nel blu, dipintu di blu”, of course, but this one had a different (and huge) place in History to occupy.

Last edited 7 months ago by Sabrina
Jonas
Jonas
7 months ago
Reply to  Sabrina

Julie Andrews actually recorded the 1960 winner, Tom Pillibi, so I suppose that’s the one I associate with Mary Poppins – but you’re right, maybe she should have done this one too…

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
7 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

Did she really? I didn’t know that! Wow

Sabrina
Sabrina
7 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

I’m also surprised to know that. But I’m pretty sure I haven’t listened to her version, since I don’t remember watching Julie Andrew singing if not in a movie. So, for some reason, I associate this more than Tom Pillibi. In any case, if EBU decides to film a Eurovision version of Mary Poppins, we already have a growing soundtrack. 😀

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
7 months ago
Reply to  Sabrina

Oh wow. I just found this: https://youtu.be/RiqIyubJjOc

hebbuzz
hebbuzz
7 months ago

Selfproclaimed diva Lys is so overrrated. ?

Kirby
Kirby
7 months ago
Reply to  hebbuzz

Don’t mess with our Lys Assia, the very first “Viva la Diva” of Eurovision!!!

Jonas
Jonas
7 months ago

1959 is definitely my favourite of these four, it is the most suited to repeat listening – at least for me.

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
7 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

It’s very catchy and the performance is TV perfection both musically and on camera. 🙂

TheDr Mistery
TheDr Mistery
7 months ago

TRIVIA: Corry Brokken was Dutch spokesperson in ESC 1997 when she got an applause when her 1958 win was mentioned. That were 29 years of difference.

2021 will be… 24 years after 1997. Time flies, doesn’t it?

Last edited 7 months ago by TheDr Mistery
Jonas
Jonas
7 months ago
Reply to  TheDr Mistery

1997 was forty years since her win, 21 years since she was presenter. May 2021 will be five years since she died.

Ben
Ben
7 months ago
Reply to  TheDr Mistery

I think you need to check your maths…

TheDr Mistery
TheDr Mistery
7 months ago
Reply to  Ben

Yeah, 10 years went forgotten… 39. Sorry for that.

Jonas
Jonas
7 months ago
Reply to  TheDr Mistery

40.

TheDr Mistery
TheDr Mistery
7 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

Yikes, what a day of senior moments for me (hides in shame for the remainder of 2020).

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
7 months ago
Reply to  TheDr Mistery

And you’ll probably have to re-calculate it in about nine days from now. Maths is just cruel.

TheDrMistery
TheDrMistery
7 months ago
Reply to  Purple Mask

True but it’s at least fair – we all get older every year.

TheDr Mistery
TheDr Mistery
7 months ago

Not my favorite songs in any of those years, especially 1958 hurts because “Volare” and “Giorgio” were right there. 1960s is the decade when the contest “found itself” with braver entries.

Last edited 7 months ago by TheDr Mistery
Kirby
Kirby
7 months ago

It’s almost impossible not to tilt the scales to “Refrain” (there’s an affective bias towards the very first Eurovsion winner, especially when we saw Ms Lys Assia enjoying the contest herself in 2000s editions, like any of us the Eurofans). I love “Net Als Toen” because it’s timeless, elegant (with that instrumental solo) and nostalgic. By the way, my big round of applause to the Wiwiteam, for this great idea of 12 polls of Christmas!!!

Colin
Colin
7 months ago

I’ve heard Refrain and Dors mon amour only maybe once or twice before and I believe this is the first time I’ve heard the other two in full. 50s were certainly the time of pioneers and visionaries. Honestly, I liked all of these four songs, but maybe my first impression of nostalgia just kicked in. I think that Switzerland 1956 and The Netherlands 1959 are a bit more memorable than the other two, but maybe that’s also just my first impression. I have an idea for Wiwibloggs. Even if sadly most of the performers of the early contests are now… Read more »

Last edited 7 months ago by Colin
Kirby
Kirby
7 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Yours is a wonderful idea! They’re living witnesses, it would be great to see what ESC was like through their eyes!

TheDr Mistery
TheDr Mistery
7 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Absolutely, that’s a marvellous idea.

hebbuzz
hebbuzz
7 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Not sure if they all speak english and or can handle the fast energy of the youth. Maybe its better to have them interviewed by former presenters still alive.

Colin
Colin
7 months ago
Reply to  hebbuzz

Not all contemporary ESC contestant speak English well either. Most of them do, but there was a number of them using a translator in interviews. Shouldn’t be a problem.
I like the idea of including the older presenters as well, but only if they are willing to do it as well. Interviewing them would be really nice too.

Belle
Belle
7 months ago

Teddy 1959. Love it!

Joe
Joe
7 months ago

1957, but I’d be lying if I didn’t say I preferred Volare or So geht das jede Nacht to all of them

Last edited 7 months ago by Joe
Teeks
Teeks
7 months ago
Reply to  Joe

So geht das jede nacho was so ahead of its time for Eurovision!

My autocorrect thought I meant “ So geht das Jedward nicht” btw lol

Last edited 7 months ago by Teeks
Joe
Joe
7 months ago
Reply to  Teeks

And then you wrote “nacho” by accident lol