Last week, four-piece boyband Stavangerkameratene debuted their Melodi Grand Prix 2021 entry “Barndomsgater”. As pre-qualified finalists, they’ll go directly to the final for the chance to represent Norway at Eurovision. But now the quartet has revealed they plan to instead sing in English at the MGP final. The music video for the new version of their track — “Who I Am” — is out now.


Stavangerkameratene – “Who I Am” (Melodi Grand Prix 2021)

Stavangerkameratene showcased their song “Barndomsgater” for the first time in the second semi-final of Melodi Grand Prix on 23 January. Since then, the track has amassed more than 100,000 streams on Spotify and has received significant radio airplay.

However, the band now say they will instead perform in English at the Melodi Grand Prix final. Their entry has been renamed “Who I Am” in an effort to connect with audiences around Europe.

“When we decided to participate in Melodi Grand Prix, our dream was definitely to proudly represent Norway in Eurovision’s international finale in Rotterdam. So therefore, we decided early on that we wished to do our song ‘Barndomsgater’ in English so that the message behind the song could be conveyed properly and understood by an international crowd of people,” the band told fans on Facebook and YouTube.

“Who I Am” was put together with the assistance of songwriters Alexander Pavelich and Peter Daniel Newman. Pavelich himself has also penned tracks for David Guetta, Ava Max and Alan Walker.

“Who I Am” will come to streaming services on Friday 12 February.

Who are Stavangerkameratene?

Stavangerkameratene consists of four successful Norwegian artists: Tommy Fredvang, Kjartan Salveson, Glenn Lyse and Ole Alexander Mæland. “It has become a strong friendship,” says Salveson. “It started with a lot of arguing, now it’s just song and music,” the singer chuckles.

Two members are Norwegian Idol winners. Salveson took the crown home in 2004, while Lyse topped the competition and won first place in 2007. Fredvang is best known for competing on The X Factor Norway in 2009. Mæland participated on The Voice in 2012.

The band’s name translates to “Stavanger Comrades” — in honour of their home town on the West coast of Norway, known for its oil and gas industry. The name Stavangerkameratene was coined by Norwegian TV host Stian Blipp — the band liked the name and kept it.
Stavangerkameratene are well known for their signature pop-folk sound. In 2016, their debut single “Vekk meg opp” — an acoustic Norwegian-language version of Avicii’s “Wake Me Up” — was certified gold in Norway, surpassing three million streams. Two album releases later, the quartet is now one of the most popular bands in Norway. Stavangerkameratene’s self-titled debut album peaked at number nine on the Norwegian album chart and remained in the top 40 for 81 weeks.

Melodi Grand Prix 2021: The Final

Stavangerkameratene will perform “Who I Am” live during the Melodi Grand Prix final on Saturday 20 February. There, they will compete to represent Norway at Eurovision 2021. So far, the MGP final line up looks like this:

  • Atle Pettersen – “World On Fire”
  • Blåsemafian feat. Hazel – “Let Loose”
  • Kaja Rode – “Feel Again”
  • KEiiNO – “Monument”
  • Raylee – “Hero”
  • Rein Alexander – “Eyes Wide Open”
  • Stavangerkameratene – “Barndomsgater”
  • TIX – “Ut av mørket”

The finalists will be joined by three more qualifying entries from the remaining semi-finals. As well, the acts who fail to qualify will have another chance to make it to the final in a second chance round on Monday 15 February. One more act will make it through.

What do you think of “Who I Am”? Do you prefer the English version or the Norwegian version? Let us know in the comments below. 

 Follow all of our Norway Eurovision 2021 news.

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Colin
Colin
3 months ago

I am kinda baffled on why would one choose to enter a contest which *allows* different languages with one song and then translate it afterwards. I think the English lyrics feel as good as the Norwegian ones, but still it feels underwhelming knowing how much The Nordics fear from having their languages presented on Eurovision.

Ashton Schier
Ashton Schier
3 months ago

ugh delusion

Heartbeater
Heartbeater
3 months ago

Seriously first Tix and now then why would they summit the song in Norwegian and then change it to English I just don’t get it

Jake
Jake
3 months ago

this is ridiculous…the producers chose automatic qualifiers to have a variety of songs in the final which includes having some songs in the native Norwegian…this last minute change for the producers might’ve prevented another Norwegian language song to be in the final…if they wanted to change it for Eurovision after their win, then it’s their right…but the idea they shift to another language during the competition is not fair…and let’s be real–they can sing it in whatever language they want…the song ain’t winning…this feels desperate and an exercise in futility

MaelleForFra
MaelleForFra
3 months ago
Reply to  Jake

It’s probably the best song so far along with tix.

Sabrina
Sabrina
3 months ago

I’ve looked for a translation of the lyrics in Norwegian so I could compared them. Though they kept the essence of the meaning of the song, I’m disappointed that some nice storytelling bits of the original were replaced with more abstract descriptions. For example, “A little toddler with a backpack on / Ready for his first day of school” became “As a boy I looked at the sky / Clouds of thunder full of wonder just waiting to come alive”. And “I stood in storms in other countries / Took steps to become a man” now it’s “Every step to… Read more »

Kalla
Kalla
3 months ago

I do find it strange these selections allow such a huge song change during the competitive period. I can’t see them posing to much of a risk at the final though.

Whisker
Whisker
3 months ago

The lyrics are so cliché. I’m very disappointed, this song is an automatic qualifier!

Una
Una
3 months ago

What’s the point of performing the song in English when the Norwegians will vote? Is there an international jury this year in MGP 2021? Am I missing something? I know most Norwegians know English.

James
James
3 months ago

Well that sucks. It sounded good in Norwegian. 🙁

Janet
Janet
3 months ago
Reply to  James

I agree. I’m not sure why they felt it needed to be changed

James
James
3 months ago
Reply to  Janet

I certainly have this feeling of being led on as a result.

If the decision to do the song in English was made from the get-go, maybe it would have been best for them to have performed the song in their intended language instead when they presented their entry in Semifinal 2.

Last edited 3 months ago by James