On Tuesday, broadcaster BTRC announced that Galasy ZMesta would represent Belarus at Eurovision 2021 with the song “Ya Nauchu Tebya (I’ll Teach You)”. The EBU have now put out a statement saying that the song is not eligible to compete in the contest in its current state as it “puts the non-political nature of the Contest in question”. They have requested that BTRC submit a modified version or a new song, otherwise they will face disqualification.

The statement was issued through the official Eurovision Twitter account and via the eurovision.tv news blog.

EBU requests Belarus modify its Eurovision 2021 entry or face disqualification

The EBU’s statement reads as follows:

“As part of the regular procedure for all songs submitted to compete in the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC), the EBU has carefully scrutinized the Belarusian song, Ya Nauchu Tebya (I’ll Teach You) by Galasy ZMesta to ensure it complies with the rules of the competition.

It was concluded that the song puts the non-political nature of the Contest in question.

In addition, recent reactions to the proposed entry risk bringing the reputation of the ESC into disrepute.

We’ve written to the broadcaster BTRC, which is responsible for Belarus’ entry for the Eurovision Song Contest, to inform them that the song, in its present form, is currently not eligible to compete.

Furthermore we’ve requested that they take all necessary steps to submit a modified version, or a new song, that is compliant with the ESC rules.

Failure to do so could result in disqualification from this year’s Contest.”

Why does Galasy ZMesta’s song break Eurovision rules?

In the statement issued by the EBU, they say that Galasy ZMesta’s song “puts the non-political nature of the Contest in question”. This is a reference to the Eurovision rules that require the event to be non-political on all terms.

In regards to the competing songs at the contest, rule 2.7(i) states:

“The lyrics and/or performance of the songs shall not bring the Shows, the ESC as such or the EBU into disrepute. No lyrics, speeches, gestures of a political, commercial or similar nature shall be permitted during the ESC.”

Since it’s release on Tuesday, “Ya Nauchu Tebya (I’ll Teach You)” has been criticised by many for breaking the above rule. The exact reason for this is related to the ongoing political situation in Belarus, which started in 2020 when pro-democracy protests erupted across the country following the re-election of President Alexander Lukashenko. These elections have been widely condemned by the international community, including by the European Union.

For more information in regards to the political situation in Belarus and how it is affecting musical artists in the country, please see the below article:

Some of the lyrics of Galasy ZMesta’s “Ya Nauchu Tebya (I’ll Teach You)” read as follows in English:

I’ll teach you how to dance under my pipe
I’ll teach you how to bite the fishing rod
I’ll teach you how to walk on a string

I will compose music especially for you
I’ll bring you a world on a saucer
I will transform your sorrows into jokes
It will be better for you

The lyrics have been interpreted by many as a form of pro-Lukashenko propaganda. Fans read the lyrics as a critique of the protests and as political support for the current regime.

The lyrics discuss how the main character should not “stop being angry”, a common trope used by pro-government media to portray protesters as angry hooligans. The lyrics furthermore talk about “teaching” or “telling” someone what to do in order to return to “normal life” and how the main character should listen to that, another common trope found in pro-governmental narratives.

This sentiment is added to by the fact that Galasy ZMesta have established themselves as singers of “political pop”, as they call it themselves, and have criticised the pro-democracy protests in most, if not all, their songs.

On their official site, the group write:

“Dear friends! When “under a sauce” “political battles” try to break the country we love and in which we are living, we cannot stay indifferent…”

As a result of the above, the EBU have decided that the song does not meet the criteria for being non-political and is therefore not eligible to compete at Eurovision. They have written to Belarus’ national broadcaster BTRC requesting that they submit a modified version of the song, or an entirely new entry, which does comply with the rules.

If BTRC is unable to submit an eligible song, they will be disqualified from Eurovision 2021.

What are your thoughts on the EBU’s statement? Let us know in the comments below.

Read more Belarus Eurovision news here

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beccaboo1212
4 months ago

Belarus better compete at JESC 2021.

Heath
Heath
6 months ago

Ooo, I haven’t heard that eurovision entry. Is it a dance track?

Andrea Danese
Andrea Danese
6 months ago

I honestly wouldn’t mind an I Love Belarus 2.0 entry. Easily the best they’ve ever sent to Eurovision!

Max
Max
6 months ago

Another proof that song is political! Lukashenko commented on song’s ban and said they’ll make another one. So let’s see on Monday if there will be any

Polina
Polina
6 months ago

The reason is that Jamala didn’t scoff at people. She put into her song dramatic experience of her family. And Galasy ZMesta spat literally in the face of Belarusians living under the Lukashenko’s dictatorship with their ‘dance under my pipe’.
Maybe, these awful metaphors in Russian from that song are clear only to the post-Soviet space but I hope it’s not so

Pikachu
Pikachu
6 months ago

Good on the ebu

Heath
Heath
6 months ago

Solo, I see that people have given a lot of reasonable arguments to you to no avail so I won’t try. This most probably won’t get past the censors but i’ll try because it needs to be said. You truly are a wanker.

Siclika
Siclika
6 months ago

Except Non mi avete fatto niente is a song denouncing terrorism and war, the reason for so many pointless deaths around the world; it doesn’t denounce political protestors. They really aren’t the same.

Last edited 6 months ago by Siclika
Joe
Joe
6 months ago

And now radio silence

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

*tumbleweed

Julian
Julian
6 months ago

There are always ways to dodge censorship. Just be creative and if you manage to get to the stage it is 90% enough to send a message. A wild example: everybody in the band wears a couple of covid masks. You can say is for caution not to get covid but it also can be because “they” did everything to silence you. We will never know what is the real message right? You already won when they want to cancel you.

raspadinha
raspadinha
6 months ago

The truth is, EBU couldn’t bear to hear this song at the festival, it’s the worst ever sent to eurovision. :p

Nils
Nils
6 months ago

i’m relieved the ebu took the necessary actions. while i think eurovision should be open even to the dictator’s perverted fantasy of belarus, lukashenko mustn’t be allowed to spit in the face of eurovision.
send some generic love song and at least pretend to keep it apolitical – and everything’s fine.
send some propaganda bs – and go f*** yourself.

raspadinha
raspadinha
6 months ago
Reply to  Nils

I don’t know what country Nils’ from but, most of us actually get to vote for our entries. And if people are not satisfied at least they get to go on social media and freely address those complaints.

Pikachu
Pikachu
6 months ago
Reply to  raspadinha

Belarus’ government represses its citizens on almost every front. Look at sources such as freedom house, or open doors. Many regard Belarus as the last dictatorship in Europe. The dude had communists ties. There are many sources documenting such. It’s not some haven of freedom I’m sure the people in Belarus are great people it seems like a pretty country but we can’t have praise for a dictator. Also, there is no dictator in my country. I’m not a fan of the government but for now, I still have my freedom. I have the right to protest peacefully and freely.… Read more »

Max
Max
6 months ago
Reply to  Pikachu

Azarenok is that you? 😉

Heath
Heath
6 months ago

I respect the rules of Eurovision and this must not be allowed. In saying that, I feel like banning them could have an adverse effect: 1) It gives the band an avenue to discuss “cancel culture”, freedom of speech etc. All of the things these kind of people like to through in your face. 2) Due to the above, the band will take this as a platform to spew their ugliness further, claiming “double standards” (somewhere here someone mentioned Jamala, which is totally different but just watch them latch on to it). To be clear, I don’t believe the above… Read more »

Dawid
Dawid
6 months ago

tbh, Jamala’s song was political af and it’s a mistake that they allowed it (haven’t meet ONE person who actually enjoyed it as a song), but just because they allowed it once doesn’t mean they should do it over and over again

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Dawid

Well you met me

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

(And, y’know, the thousands of Europeans, Australians, and Israelis that voted for it)

Last edited 6 months ago by Joe
Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

(And if you’re from Poland, I highly doubt you’re correct, seeing as Poland gave Ukraine the Grand Slam Douze Points as I like to call it – first with every juror and first with the televote)

David
David
6 months ago
Reply to  Dawid

1944 literally won. What do you mean “no one enjoyed it”

Cai1995
Cai1995
6 months ago
Reply to  Dawid

I enjoyed it, gave me goose pimples, with the emotions in it,

Nils
Nils
6 months ago

feel free to get lost, lukashenko muppet.

Lola
Lola
6 months ago

When do the submissions close again? Is it on Monday or am I mistaken? 16 countries in semi 1 seems so little, but then again the competition there is gonna be fierce anyways!

Monika
Monika
6 months ago

Great news, that way there would be only 16 countries in the 1st semifinal. And no more 12 guaranteed points to Mother Russia, if Belarus is disqualified!

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Monika

Azerbaijan: Are you sure about that?

Nicolas
Nicolas
6 months ago
Reply to  Monika

oh oh, this is now I feel that Russia will enter the game asking EBU to not disqualify Belarus and send back to 2016 when EBU rejected Russia complain and approved 1944.
The drama is not over yet.

Last edited 6 months ago by Nicolas
Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Nicolas

Nah, Russia isn’t going to make a stink. With 1944 they could at least make a case that the lyrics were slandering them, personally. They can’t really do that here.

aristeia
aristeia
6 months ago
Reply to  Monika

SF1 is really hard to pick so far, definitely stacked. Which 6 would you rule out?

At the moment I think Israel and North Macedonia will miss out. Maybe Slovenia too although I think it’s decent.

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Monika

Oh god you’re back

Joe
Joe
6 months ago

Hi, Guy from Galasy ZMesta! Hope you know we all think puppets of Lukashenko’s regime stink! Free Belarus!

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

Also we didn’t mind with Jamala’s song because it had a GOOD message!

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

Someone with common sense, more like

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

Y’all are just insane then.

T.J.
T.J.
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

Move to Belarus then!

tomtomtom
tomtomtom
6 months ago

If Belarus withdraws does it mean that they also lose their votes? This would hurt Russia in SF1. Anyone know the answer?

Lin
Lin
6 months ago
Reply to  tomtomtom

Well yeah, you don’t compete, you don’t vote

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Lin

There have been two times where a country has been forced to withdraw close to the contest for various reasons and still got to vote out of fairness (Cyprus at the 2005 Junior contest and Serbia and Montenegro at the 2006 adult contest). Hasn’t happened since – hypothetically, I can think of a couple instances where maybe it SHOULD have happened (Armenia in 2012, Ukraine in 2019), and maybe a few where it COULD have happened had the broadcasters also decided not to show the contest after they pulled out (Russia in 2017, Romania in 2016, Georgia in 2009). But… Read more »

Yannis
Yannis
6 months ago

So glad the EBU had the balls to put a strong veto without clearly taking sides but being fair and impartial. Something that every single country should do against Belarus and support the democratic fight of Belarusian for democracy! Solidarity with Belarusians!!!!!

Pandaman
Pandaman
6 months ago
Reply to  Yannis

Yeah… no.

Jai
Jai
6 months ago
Reply to  Yannis

How much did your daddy Lukashenko pay you? Just go away!

Iamme
Iamme
6 months ago
Reply to  Yannis

Are you kidding or what? Italians are pretty well known for always complaining about their political class… …which you can’t do in BelaRussia!

Dawid
Dawid
6 months ago

Belarus: “I’ll teach you” 😉
EBU:”Here, there’s your lesson” .-.
Belarus:comment image

Last edited 6 months ago by Dawid
Dawid
Dawid
6 months ago
Reply to  Dawid

Have you read this article?

Nils
Nils
6 months ago
Reply to  Dawid

every

Pikachu
Pikachu
6 months ago
Reply to  Dawid

They have the right to enforce the rules. There is no censorship. Belarus has no freedom of speech as a right.

Magpie
Magpie
6 months ago

Thank God. I couldn’t even listen to the entirety of that “song”.

gilpgilpgilp
gilpgilpgilp
6 months ago

The obvious solution is to call Zena to rescue Belarus!

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  gilpgilpgilp

Belarus isn’t boycotting the contest. The contest is boycotting Belarus.

Nils
Nils
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

yep

Last edited 6 months ago by Nils
Nils
Nils
6 months ago
Reply to  gilpgilpgilp

i’m sorry i’ll have to break the news to you, but … apparently proud belarus is already busy boycotting what dictator lukashenko wants it to be.
oh yeah, and this turd of a song, too.

Zander25
Zander25
6 months ago

good thing EBU got the balls to stand up this time.

Oriol99
Oriol99
6 months ago

*insert 5 clown faces*

Last edited 6 months ago by Oriol99
xohxoh
xohxoh
6 months ago

Let them come to sweep the floor after the show.

Héctor
Héctor
6 months ago

This is what they wanted. I’m sure they knew they were going to be DQ. Their only intention was to cause a stir. They got it. Now they will talk about Western dictatorship.

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Héctor

You’re a traitor to the people of Belarus who want actual freedom. May you eventually free yourself from that awful dictatorship’s lies and see the light.

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

You looking in the mirror when you say that? I more feel sorry for you than anything.

raspadinha
raspadinha
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

The funny is you waisting all this time on social media. Maybe being paid for it makes it better, hã

Sabrina
Sabrina
6 months ago

What they did was so ugly and inappropriated that even EBU wasn’t able to ignore. I imagine they’ll withdraw, since Belarus will probably get a bad result either way after this tantrum in form of a song.

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Sabrina

A dictatorship thinks everything should be banned, no?

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

We don’t much like pro-dictatorship propaganda. I don’t see the issue in this song getting banned.

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

You’re a nutjob

Danny McEvoy
Danny McEvoy
6 months ago

I cover all the songs on YT…I had a look at the Belarus song..it was gonna take me ages to sort out the Russian…have to say I wasn’t comfortable about covering it…y’know I respect Belarussians…I had a feeling it was gonna get banned..so I held off on the effort!! …Joy!!….I can’t see them changing it…I reckon it will be a Belarus free competition this year.

Danny

Efraim
Efraim
6 months ago

At this point I completely expect BTRC to just take the DQ, for three reasons: 1) There’s not much time left to rework the lyrics, let alone prepare a new song from scratch. 2) If they’re thrown out they can find a way to spin it into a story of some kind of international anti-Lukashenko conspiracy for the sake of propaganda. 3) Even if they do change the lyrics or the song and compete in Rotterdam, they don’t have a whole lot to gain. Most international voters will likely have turned on them because of this incident happening in the… Read more »

Brutus
Brutus
6 months ago

PLEASE tell me there will be a William and Deban reaction video to the song anyway. PLEASE!

bartosz
bartosz
6 months ago
Reply to  Brutus

I hope there won’t be any reaction video. I don’t think we should give any attention to this band and song.

AdD
AdD
6 months ago
Reply to  bartosz

Or the whole of Belarus for that matter. You can’t play if you can’t follow basic simple rules.

Epicurean
Epicurean
6 months ago

Unacceptable to let these puppets perform at Eurovision.

Nicolas
Nicolas
6 months ago
Reply to  Epicurean

Don’t worry they haved never the intention to perform at Eurovision. Belarus will withdraw or wait for DQ and will then try to point out the double standards with the 1944 case.

Ashton Schier
Ashton Schier
6 months ago
Reply to  Epicurean

says ‘wild gay’

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Ashton Schier

What’s the LGBTIQ mafia and who’s the don? Don Bruno Tonioli?

Jai
Jai
6 months ago
Reply to  Epicurean

We’re a mafia now? I didn’t realize, I must be behind on paying my annual membership fee!

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Jai

You serve fish or swim with ’em, hunty!

Kermy
Kermy
6 months ago
Reply to  Epicurean

Yes, and Bagga Chips is our Godmother. What exactly have you been smoking?

Kosey
Kosey
6 months ago

Oh please let them change to Katya and Daz!

I don’t think my brain would be able to cope with the complications!!!

Colin
Colin
6 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

I second this. It would still be a bad song, but a “guilty pleasure” level of bad, not unlistenable like this.

Lorenzo Celli
Lorenzo Celli
6 months ago

Disqualify them. Whatever they send, it will be permeated with politics

MTD
MTD
6 months ago

Oh, how much I wished EBU to had the balls back in 2016 with Ukraine. Hah!

Davidinho
Davidinho
6 months ago
Reply to  MTD

If this song was anti-Lukashenko, they wouldn’t do anything, trust me 🙂

Kris
Kris
6 months ago
Reply to  Davidinho

Brtc had to select the song. If the broadcaster had such freedom to openly criticize the govt, then there would have not been protests in belarus

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Davidinho

You are nuttier than a squirrel in a cashew factory

Nils
Nils
6 months ago
Reply to  Davidinho

yes, belarus … the very definition of a ‘normal country’. sure.

unfortunately though, you’re comment didn’t get censored. i’m afraid that means you’ll slowly but steadily be turned gay now. don’t try to escape, it’s already too late. just let it happen.

Jai
Jai
6 months ago
Reply to  MTD

Jamala’s song technically had the defense that it was a historical song about an event from the past ( hence the title) . I’m not saying it was right or wrong but they found a loophole to exploit. This 2021 song doesn’t even have that because it’s so blatantly political

teddytete_
teddytete_
6 months ago
Reply to  MTD

Jamala’s song did not include any political reference in the song whatsoever. She has stated that the song is about her history about the crimean war but could be an anti lgtb oppression anthem as well.

Thorula
Thorula
6 months ago

The statement is good but maybe EBU should have apologize. I mean they should have judge the song and its content before uploading it. Did they figure out by themselves or would they have understand without all the claims?

Bella
Bella
6 months ago

Happy to see the EBU has some dignity left.

Rasmus
Rasmus
6 months ago

I am so happy that i cant breath! Get the dictator OUT and FREE Belarus !

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Rasmus

Yeah, the way openly LGBTIQ performers don’t do any government-sponsored events in Belarus and they all stink.

Lin
Lin
6 months ago

What? I really thought he sings about a girl he wants to teach something, no politics came into my mind. I must be naive 😀

Ant
Ant
6 months ago
Reply to  Lin

He’s singing to a man btw, so it must be a gay anthem lol

Whisker
Whisker
6 months ago
Reply to  Ant

LOL!

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
6 months ago

Canada will just have to send Justin Bieber instead. #OpenUp

Martin Månsson
Martin Månsson
6 months ago
Reply to  Purple Mask

Not against Canada taking part in Eurovision but I’d prefer Celine Dion Feat. Ryan Reynolds

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
6 months ago
Reply to  Purple Mask

Just to be clear: I was obviously kidding. But what part of the joke annoyed you all more: Canada or Justin Bieber?

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Purple Mask

Justin Bieber. Like that looney who kept saying Ricegum should represent San Marino. At least pick a good Canadian act, they exist!

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

Gordon Lightfoot? 🙂
Or Shawn Mendes perhaps?

Jonas
Jonas
6 months ago
Reply to  Purple Mask

Tegan and Sara.

Coco
Coco
6 months ago

39 countries this year? Wow.

ESCFan2009
ESCFan2009
6 months ago
Reply to  Coco

At the moment, this commentary has 39 likes. Wonderful! I’m always up for liking a comment, but please, it fits so well right now… 😀

Last edited 6 months ago by ESCFan2009
Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

Same

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Coco

You mean Russia, the country sending a feminist anthem that encourages going against societal roles, performed by a woman from an immigrant family who’s pro-LGBTQ and body-positive? That Russia?

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Coco

Also, let’s make it clear: you need Russia. Russia doesn’t need you.

Coco
Coco
6 months ago
Reply to  Joe

You are right, these small countries don’t understand they are just toilet paper for Russia.

Frisian esc
Frisian esc
6 months ago

I’m imagining them changing the lyrics so that it’s eligible for the contest in may and then they do something shocking during the liveshow like making a statement.

Jonas
Jonas
6 months ago
Reply to  Frisian esc

Ssh, don’t give them ideas…

Leendert Jan
Leendert Jan
6 months ago
Reply to  Frisian esc

I think it’s most likely that Belarus will withdraw, like Georgia in 2009.

Zuzu
Zuzu
6 months ago
Reply to  Leendert Jan

“I don’t wanna put in”
Unforgettable.

Vytautas
Vytautas
6 months ago

There is a 99% of chance that Cockroach won’t have a platform to spread propaganda.

poe-tay-toe-chips
poe-tay-toe-chips
6 months ago

You know an entry is messed up when the people from that country are probably celebrating the possibility of disqualification harder than anyone else on the European continent.

Denis
Denis
6 months ago

Problem is even if they change song it will be still be broadcaster competing. Why not do like Olympics and let them compete under neutral flag?

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Denis

Or a certain other flag…white-red-white, maybe?

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
6 months ago
Reply to  Denis

Or better yet, ban all mention of countries at Eurovision! 🙂 (*hides)

Kosey
Kosey
6 months ago
Reply to  Purple Mask

I am with you Purple Mask, the whole country thing just brings out too much negativity. Maybe we could rearrange it so that it was a genre contest – ie, a ballad, a rock song, a party song, a techno song, a classical song, etc?

Jonas
Jonas
6 months ago
Reply to  Kosey

That would be a totally new contest, and an end to the one we know and love.

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
6 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

Alternative view: Why hold on to 20th Century ideals in the 21st Century?

Kosey
Kosey
6 months ago
Reply to  Purple Mask

Perhaps late 20th century ideals? I fear we may be returning to early 20th century ideals unfortunately.

Vytautas
Vytautas
6 months ago
Reply to  Denis

These two are literally different situations and different reasons behind them. Theoretically, if Belarus under the neutral flag win, what’s next – where the ESC 2022 would take place? Antarctica?

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
6 months ago
Reply to  Vytautas

#FrozenVision

Whisker
Whisker
6 months ago
Reply to  Purple Mask

Hilarious!

T.J.
T.J.
6 months ago
Reply to  Denis

It’s a way to give Belarus the chance to withdraw – which they will do – without loosing their face. Both sides know already that there will be no new song. Belarus is out this year and I doubt it’ll come back until Lukashenko has been cast away.

Ang
Ang
6 months ago
Reply to  Denis

They couldn’t let them compete under a national flag. For a start, the group wouldn’t want that. They’re pro-regime & pretty much support everything Eurovision hates. Why such an anti-lgbt+ group wants to participate in a pro-lgbt+ rights competition is beyond me. They’ve said some vile things against the LGBT+ community. Tbh if they participate, I will not watch the competition this year, & that will be very upsetting. (Typical British understatement!) I’ve been a fan of ESC since childhood & think this year is turning out brilliantly with some fantastic songs, but you have to take a stand sometimes.… Read more »

Danil
Danil
6 months ago

EBU, thank you so much from all the Belarusian people! ?

Last edited 6 months ago by Danil
Nils
Nils
6 months ago
Reply to  Danil

have you checked youtube yet? just saying …

Danil
Danil
6 months ago
Reply to  Danil

I am a Belarusian. And I do not know a single Belarusian who was not offended by this song

CarlosM
CarlosM
6 months ago
Reply to  Danil

We get it, troll! You love dictatorships. Why not move to the ultimate dictatorship that is North Korea? I’m sure they’d just love to have you.

Da Euro Neuro Lord and Master
Da Euro Neuro Lord and Master
6 months ago

At this moment, Daz Sampson is beside his phone waiting for the call!

Nicolas
Nicolas
6 months ago

Ah AH I was just about to write the same thing DAZ may be now begging BTRC.

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
6 months ago

You know what: I actually think this would solve a lot of problems. Daz: Go for it! 🙂

Whisker
Whisker
6 months ago

That level of desperation is disturbing. What in the burning hxll?

Leo
Leo
6 months ago

If they actually withdraw, I can’t really see them returning with the current regime!
Something like Turkey I guess??

Lance Esgard
Lance Esgard
6 months ago
Reply to  Leo

Maybe closer to Hungary, in terms of the timing in relation to political shifts within the state.

Amy
Amy
6 months ago

I am against Belarusian entry this year, but it is double standards. What about Jamala? her song was also 100% political.

Last edited 6 months ago by Amy
Ashton Schier
Ashton Schier
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

Jamala’s song: a story about how her family suffered as a result of deportation.
Galasy ZMesta’s song: a story about how protesters should shut up and obey a dictator.

I can’t really find a universe in which these two are at all similar.

Amy
Amy
6 months ago
Reply to  Ashton Schier

I like Jamala’s song musically. But we all know what is the real story behind her story. And what was the timing that year to enter with such song and why it won. So please. I am not defending Belarus. But these are double standards 100%. None political songs should be allowed.

Last edited 6 months ago by Amy
teddytete_
teddytete_
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

The lyrics only talk about traumatic events tho. And about war in general without choosing any sides.

Lance Esgard
Lance Esgard
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

Face the Shadow (Armenia, 2015) was originally called ‘Don’t Deny’ and was alleged to be about the Armenian Genocide (2015 was the centenary of the event). Given the original title, the lyrics and the timing, it could and was interpreted by various people as being a song really about those denying the Armenian Genocide. I find that one more political than 1944. Face the Shadow is officially about people finding when happiness when they are united and living in harmony… lyrically that’s a stretch to put it kindly. 1944 really was directly a song about a historical event…even if the… Read more »

onemage
onemage
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

It’s not only about politics, this song also mocks and humiliates people that fight for democracy and their rights AT THIS MOMENT

Purple Mask
Purple Mask
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

Sadly this turned out to be true after ESC 2016 was over, and I for one felt fooled. It’s understandable that ESC organisers are trying their best to prevent a similar scenario from happening again in 2021, even though this situation is politically very different.

Danil
Danil
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

Jamala’s song didn’t offend anyone. And the under-song of Lukashenko is a spit in the face of the entire Belarusian people

Pandaman
Pandaman
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

I mean, you can always ask EBU to disqualify Jamala from Eurovision 2021, sure.

Ant
Ant
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

1944 didn’t have any political messaging in the song itself.

The fact that Russia was unhappy with Crimea being mentioned and that it brought more attention to the occupation of Crimea made it political, of course. Without the political situation Jamala probably wouldn’t have been picked this specific song as her Eurovision bid even though she had been commemorating and actively raising awareness of Stalin’s Crimean Tatar genocide for years even before the 2014 occupation.

But then again, it was something Ukrainian people voted for to represent their country, not a dictator pushing his propaganda.

Completely different situations.

Pandaman
Pandaman
6 months ago
Reply to  Ant

Not to mention that one entry was condemning a certain evil, while the other one is glorifying it.

Alexander
Alexander
6 months ago
Reply to  Ant

You’re correct in saying that Jamala’s song wasn’t political—however, choosing such a song that year was clearly a political move. Ukraine skipped one year at the ESC after the Crimea crisis and because of the military actions in Luhansk & Donetsk, ‘sponsored’ by Russia, and comes back with such a song. I mean, come on. Ruslana—one of the jurors—confirmed that herself by saying, “They [Russia] took away a piece of our land from us and we’re supposed to be silent?” Also: when the song just came out, they would only call it “historical.” But since people kept bitching about it,… Read more »

Ant
Ant
6 months ago
Reply to  Alexander

Yeah of course it was a statement that Ukrainian public traumatized by 2014 chose to make that year. “are we supposed to be silent?” was exactly the sentiment, a cheerful song in that year would look like poor taste for Ukrainians. That song resonated with the voters in a special way especially because of the politics, I agree. So, we can say that the song was not political but it did reap benefits of the political sympathies (also it attracted a lot of opposition and 0 points from many juries but those matter a lot less in the scoreboard). Many… Read more »

Alexander
Alexander
6 months ago
Reply to  Ant

Oh, I absolutely agree with you that politically motivated decisions will always take place at the ESC—even unwillingly like in your examples. Sending the Tolmachevy sisters 2014 and the angel-like Polina Gagarina was clearly a well-thought move, as well. But to me personally—and I’m not forcing my opinion on anyone—choosing Jamala’s song was not just politically motivated, it was also a political *provocation* since they clearly wanted to piss off Russia. That’s the difference to me. As a Russian citizen myself, I’m in no way supporting Kreml’s actions and my heart goes fully to Ukraine. But I just feel sad… Read more »

Last edited 6 months ago by Alexander
Jamie
Jamie
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

Jamala’s song does not mention anything specific. If you read the lyrics they are all about pain and suffer and can be interpreted in many ways.

Alexander
Alexander
6 months ago
Reply to  Jamie

So does the song by Galasy ZMesta—it does not mention anything specific and the lyrics can be interpreted in many ways. But when you put it into the context, things get political. Just like it was/is the case with Jamala’s song. So I personally have to agree with Amy.

Max
Max
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

Jamala’s song was kind of political, BUT she sang about thing that happen to her people in 1944 and the message of her song was “what did you do to us? Why? Leave us in peace”. As you remember the Eurovision appeared soon after World War II to unite European countries and to send message “lets leave all together in peace” That “Galasy ZMesta” didn’t choose to sing a song about bad things happening in Belarus using hidden meaning of the lyrics, but chose the song with clear political message (at least clear to all russian speaking people. Even if… Read more »

Last edited 6 months ago by Max
MTD
MTD
6 months ago
Reply to  Amy

Don’t spread facts here Amy. People here will only be supportive if it fits their view. While I TOTALLY support the Belarus related position, I would equally trash EBU about being so hypocritical in the past.

KRM
KRM
6 months ago

I felt kinda sorry for Kazna when I saw her story some minutes ago.
She is literally begging everyone to support her so that she can represent Belarus this year.

She would definitely be a better choice, however, since the broadcaster would be the same one, I fear she wouldn’t get much support either and would waste her song.

I hope for the best decision, but if someone should represent Belarus, I think it should be Kazna.

Max
Max
6 months ago
Reply to  KRM

Sorry for KAZNA, but there should be no-one representing Belarus this year. People in Belarus being jailed for speaking out against Lukashenko and once they released from the jail they are forced to pay for a food they received in jail. And at the same time our Taxes are spent on propaganda songs on Eurovision just to pleased Lukashenko. That’s unacceptable!

Nils
Nils
6 months ago
Reply to  Max

i’d disagree. if it’s some song by some belarusian artist, that’s perfectly fine to me. belarus is a part of europe. and we should let them know they always will be, no matter what.
so if btrc sends some generic apolitical ‘love, love, peace, peace’ song by an artist that didn’t necessarily have to blow the dictator in order to participate, they should be good to go.

Last edited 6 months ago by Nils
Max
Max
6 months ago
Reply to  Nils

I’m from Belarus and without doubt we consider ourselfs as a part of Europe, but you have no idea who is running BTRC. 99% that they won’t change that song to a normal one because that would mean that they agree it’s another failure of propaganda

Danil
Danil
6 months ago
Reply to  KRM

Kazna is a hypocrite. Any self-respecting artist will refuse to represent BTRC under the flag of Lukashenko

Joe
Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Danil

Kazna wants to represent Belarus with a culturally-appropriative song under Lukaschenko’s flag. No thanks.

Diabolo
Diabolo
6 months ago
Reply to  KRM

If you look more carefully, you can also see some political messages in KAZNA’s song as well…
“They can talk all they want, But I’m gonna walk the way that I want”
“They see I’m up now, Looking from way down, Every time I come around, I always make them shutdown”

Last edited 6 months ago by Diabolo