Photo: EBU

The Covid-19 pandemic has affected many events across the globe, with restrictions easing on a gradual basis. Now members of Italian broadcaster RAI have revealed the Eurovision 2022 host venue, PalaOlimpico, is currently set to be at 65% capacity as a result of such restrictions.

The news was reported by local online newspaper Torino Oggi following the first training meeting of volunteers for this year’s contest in Turin.

Eurovision 2022 at 65% capacity

Tickets for Eurovision 2022 are not yet available for sale, but this information gives us some idea of how many fans will be able to attend.

When set up with an end stage, PalaOlimpico arena has a capacity of roughly 13,000 people. Reducing this to 65% would allow approximately 8,450 fans inside. Though, the exact dimensions of the Eurovision 2022 stage may alter these numbers.

During the meeting, it was also noted that the 65% capacity went along with a requirement for attendees to wear masks.

 
 
 
 
 
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However, this is not the final decision. Guido Rossi, Head of the Turin TV Production Centre, noted:

“We hope that in May we can work at maximum capacity, guaranteeing safety.”

Therefore, depending on how the pandemic develops over the next few months and what restrictions Italy still has in place at the time of the contest in May, we may see more spectators allowed into the PalaOlimpico arena.

Opening Ceremony and Eurovision Village

During the volunteer training meeting, it was discussed that there are also many events happening outside of PalaOlimpico.

The opening ceremony on 8 May has been confirmed to be taking place at The Palace of Venaria (Reggia di Venaria Reale). Here, acts will show up and show out along the red carpet (or whichever colour organisers decide to use for 2022).

Meanwhile, fans will be able to enjoy activities even if they’re not at the arena by attending the Eurovision Village. Italian media has previously noted that the village will be built in Piazza Castello, one of the central squares of Turin.

What do you think? Are you hoping to see Eurovision 2022 and PalaOlimpico arena running at 100% capacity in May? Let us know in the comments below.

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Michael crosse
Michael crosse
4 months ago

Lol for Ukraine among punters who have backed to song into second favorite Ireland outsiders with bookies but in top 10 in Eurovision poll I think I recall some song last year perhaps ajerbijan being very long odds yet they qualified

Alex
Alex
4 months ago

everyone says accom prices are crazy high but it happens every year except Kyiv.

I hope they do a 100% capacity, cmon covid is already decreasing everywhere and it will ve minimal by May. They need to do a 100% capacity with masks even though the Dutch did not force masks in the arena (see camera shots).

There is high demand for the tickets from both international fans and local people. Rotterdam was SOLD OUT (all shows) in February before the covid pandemic and Rotterdam arena is massive.

Jonas
Jonas
4 months ago
Reply to  Alex

It doesn’t matter how big the arena is, only three thousand people were allowed.

Denis
Denis
4 months ago

But has any Arena ever been full? Seens like every year peiple demand the biggest arena but then never actually fill it. Always some empty spaces shown. Maybe they should hire seat fillers like at award shows

Alex
Alex
4 months ago
Reply to  Denis

yes they have been full, wjat ae you talking about? maybe in israel and ukraine it was difficult

ogi
ogi
3 months ago
Reply to  Alex

lisbon wasn’t full

vetrina
vetrina
4 months ago

I booked my accommodation from the very first day of the announcement. If I won’t manage to book a ticket for the Grand Final… I won’t mind! I’ve heard that the vibe at Eurovision Village is great, so I may watch the show at Turin’s central square!

Deb
Deb
4 months ago

I understand that ticketing planning under Covid is complicated… However, that they are delaying the sale of tickets so much may lead to internationals not going at all. Someone flying from another country to attend the event in Italy needs some time to plan the trip. It is a bit frustrating that they are not even giving some information regarding an approximate date when tickets are going to be sold.

Morwen
Morwen
4 months ago
Reply to  Deb

actually the hotels in Turin and around Turin are 100% booked so internationals who wanted to come have already reserved their place in the city, so… but it’s true they should give some more information already

KarmaLeon
KarmaLeon
4 months ago

Ive already booked an hotel there so i cross My fingers to get tickets …. The packages thing for ogaes should be cancelled

Jonas
Jonas
4 months ago

Even if there was no Covid, I’d be worried about this looking half empty.

People demand big arenas, but never think about how exactly they are going to be filled. Most ordinary people don’t even know it is possible to buy a ticket, and wouldn’t pay such high prices anyway. Especially when they can just watch it on television for free.

For this to be full for two semi-finals and one final, we will need mostly Italians – is that going to happen?

Chris
Chris
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

Lisbon 2018 was full and was a bigger arena than this, and indeed I experienced a lot of Portuguese people during many of the rehearsal shows! On top of that, just Eurovision fans alone manage to compete with each other for the live shows enough to fill the arena never mind “normal people” – look at 2011 for evidence of that.

Jonas
Jonas
4 months ago
Reply to  Chris

I don’t mean to say it’s not possible, or that all countries are the same. I’m happy so many Portuguese people were there, I wish they had been shown on camera more.

The 2011 semi-finals were not full.

gea
gea
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

Yes, but let’s not forget the show was not in an arena, but in a stadium.

Vale
Vale
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

Turin has a strategic position, close to France and other countries. Plus there are two hosts that are famous internationally. I don’t think the tickets will be unsold.

Erik
Erik
4 months ago
Reply to  Vale

Wich one of them is famous?

James
James
4 months ago
Reply to  Erik

Laura Pausini and Mika.

Samo
Samo
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

Then it’s a matter of pricing. Given how many people try to get tickets for the final, there definitely is an interest in going to Eurovision, but many probably don’t find the price a good value for semis.

Jonas
Jonas
4 months ago
Reply to  Samo

Tickets should be free, let the public apply to the broadcaster if they are interested. I know it makes them some money, but maybe a better idea would be to stop all the unnecessary expenses like the off-camera opening carpet thing and hundreds of interviews the performers are forced to give. The EBU are a broadcasting union – just concentrate on the actual broadcast.

Polegend Godgarina
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

denmark 2001 and germany 2011 were hosted in massive, 60k+ capacity venues. all sold out. it won’t be a problem lol

Jonas
Jonas
4 months ago

The aisles were a mile wide in the Parken. 2011’s semi-finals were half empty.

Jonas
Jonas
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

Even the semi-finals in smaller Tel Aviv were not full. Anyway, I was only asking a question, I’m glad it gave you a laugh. Thank you all for answering.

Alex
Alex
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

Nah you’re wrong. Tel Aviv struggled with tickets because prices were freaking ridiculous. They made the stupid decision to hold the contest in a small conference center and they wanted to make a profit so they increased the prices and all seats were expensive, even those in the back. of course it wouldn’t sell out and people preferred to watch it outdoors.

It’s a completely difference case in Turin.

Alex
Alex
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

how do you know semifinals were half empty?I dont recall seeing empty seats

Jonas
Jonas
4 months ago
Reply to  Alex

I do. The whole arena was not used, if you look again you will see only the lower balconies had people in them.

Jonas
Jonas
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

They’re probably not called balconies, but whatever the top half of the place is called, it was closed off.

gea
gea
4 months ago
Reply to  Jonas

A good example is Belgrade 2008, semi final 1…It was almost empty.

Alex
Alex
4 months ago
Reply to  gea

Big arena in a poor country…