Despite Susanne Georgi’s long-term fight to bring Andorra back to Eurovision, it won’t happen in 2023. The microstate’s broadcaster – RTVA – has confirmed to Spanish outlet Eurofestivales that they have no plans to return next year.

The content manager of RTVA, Dani Ortolà, told Eurofestivales: “Despite being part of the EBU, we do not plan to participate in the Eurovision Song Contest in the short or medium term.”

With that Andorra is officially the first country to confirm non-participation in next year’s Eurovision.

Andorra will not return to Eurovision in 2023

The news has understandably left many fans unsatisfied, especially after the favourite advanced made by the country’s last Eurovision singer Susanne Georgi. For years the 2009 Eurovision alum has been working hard to secure the microstate’s return. Among other things, she found a private sponsor and even got a “verbal green light” from the Andorran Government for the country to make a comeback in 2022. As she told us in 2020, “It’s only good news.”

However, RTVA confirmed no participation for 2022. And it’s the same story for 2023.

The fight is not yet over for Susanne Georgi. Prior to the decision from RTVA, she celebrated her past participation on Instagram with a series of photos and an encouraging message.

“Some of the most amazing moments of my career,” she says of the contest. “I am still fighting with every bone in my body for Andorra to return to this crazy show and I WILL make it happen, sooner or later.”

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Susanne Georgi (@susannegeorgiofficial)

Andorra’s past Eurovision singers stand with Susanne in her mission.

In an interview with Andorran radio programme “Fan de Carpeta” in 2021, artists stressed the importance of Andorra returning to Eurovision.

ESC 2008 representative Gisela said that Eurovision is “a big international cultural event and there are so many artists that have a lot to say.”

Likewise, Marta Roure (ESC 2004) suggested that participating in Eurovision “is a great publicity opportunity.”

During this year’s first Barcelona’s Eurovision Party, Marta also told us in an interview about the importance of Andorra getting back to Eurovision.

“You win more than you lose,” she told us. “I feel that money scares them, but at the same time, they invest great sums in publicity campaigns. [Eurovision] is also a marketing opportunity, of our language, culture, traditions… we should go back.”

Andorra missing out on Eurovision promo opportunities

Eurovision brings huge benefits to the artists and participating broadcasters. This year more than 160 million people tuned in to at least some of the three live shows. Many past Andorran representatives, including Susanne, are aware of that.

RTVA journalist Noemí Rodríguez shared that reality during a recent episode of “Els Matins de la Nacional.” According to Noemí, the country should really think about the visibility that Eurovision could bring for a tiny country like Andorra, and study the benefits of participating.

As she tells “Els Matins de la Nacional:”

“The festival costs a considerable amount of money that must be paid to the EBU, a total of around 300,000 euros to carry out the correct promotional work. But I want to make a reflection. Cirque Du Soleil – a Canadian entertainment company and the largest contemporary circus producer in the world – costs [Andorra] around 3 million euros and yet takes place yearly,” generating more than 21 million euros for the country, according to the Ministry of Tourism.

“It’s necessary to study which benefits participating in Eurovision would bring to Andorra, acknowledging that [Eurovision] promotes the different participating countries with labels and boasts millions and millions of views every year.”

Andorra in Eurovision

Andorra participated in Eurovision on six occasions between 2004 and 2009, before dropping out due to economic difficulties. Sadly, they never qualified for the grand final. This unfortunate outcome still grants them the title of the only country to have never made it to the Eurovision final.

Andorra’s best result occurred in 2007. That year, rock band Anonymous placed 12th in the semi-final. Nick Gain, the leader of Anonymous, has also previously stated he is in favour of bringing the microstate back to the contest.

Do you think Susanne Georgi will succeed in her fight to bring Andorra back to Eurovision ? How much do you miss the microstate in the contest? Let us know in the comment section below!

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CookyMonzta
CookyMonzta
3 months ago

Crap! No Russia (for the foreseeable–possibly distant–future), no Belarus, no Turkey…

What will it take for the others (Liechtenstein, Bosnia, Slovakia, et. al.) to fill the void if not Andorra?

Azan
Azan
3 months ago

So sad! Hope to see them eventually!

The Voice of Reason
The Voice of Reason
3 months ago

FLIP. I love Andorra! At least they’ll be participating in the Contivision Song Contest with ‘Make You Say’!

Efthymios (#2)
Efthymios (#2)
3 months ago

F

Trom
Trom
3 months ago

Waiting for Bosnia, Hungary, Slovakia, Turkey, Monaco, Luxembourg and also Czech and Macedonia in 3,2,1 …

Teeks
Teeks
3 months ago
Reply to  Trom

Why do you think Czech Republic and North Macedonia will pull out? I heard the first was already organising its next National final.

ete sech
ete sech
3 months ago
Reply to  Trom

You forgot Ireland, Latvia and Montenegro xd

Alanna
3 months ago

Andorra and Anonymous in 2007 we’re the best song in the contest. I will never forget Save the World, it’s my anthem!!!

Héctor
Héctor
3 months ago

Anonymous should have qualified back then. That kind of punk pop was very popular. I love it and I would love to see Andorra coming back. Maybe if Spain had won this year…

ete sech
ete sech
3 months ago
Reply to  Héctor

I can recall the song getting some traction (I didn’t follow ESC until fairly recently but I’ve always been familiar with several ESC entries) and being featured in some old YT videos. They were so robbed! 🙁

Héctor
Héctor
3 months ago
Reply to  ete sech

Sure. It’s in my top 25 entries in my “historical” top (only ranging from 2007 to 2022, though). It has some naive and uplifting vibes and, everytime I listen to it, it takes me back to those years, si I have to add the nostalgic feeling to an otherwise still good song. I didn’t follow Eurovision as much as I do know by any means. I didn’t even remember watching that huge SF, yet I’m sure I saw “Salvem el Mon” somewhere back then (maybe I did watch the SF though. I’m also very familiar with some other old entries… Read more »

Una
Una
3 months ago

Broadcasters should try their best with the best they can in terms of entry/act and consider Eurovision in positive terms only. Advancing to the GF should not be their only goal, nor should monies be their primary concern.
Having said that, I wish for Andorra’s return at some point. I am sure there are Andorran artists ready for it.

ete sech
ete sech
3 months ago

It’s such a shame RTVA doesn’t want to try again, they’re missing out on many opportunities and visibility. Maybe they’re just scared of paying the fee and not making it to the finale?

MonsieurMüller
MonsieurMüller
3 months ago

Why can’t EBU charge less to microstates? Why are they playing the tight-fisted boy who’s not letting others join the party? With the departure of Turkey, Hungary, B&H, Russia and Belarus (and the confirmation of Kazakhstan’s lack of interest) it would be fun to see Monaco, Andorra, Luxembourg and Slovakia returning; even Liechtenstein joining in the future.

Clara
Clara
3 months ago

Microstates doesn’t mean lower income states though. Especially in Europe

Lorena
Lorena
3 months ago
Reply to  Clara

Not in this case, for sure

Trom
Trom
3 months ago

Problem is other countries doesnt care – Slovakia for example or Luxembourg … Its not about money but about popularity and fe in Slovakia or Czech ESC will be never popular enough sadly …

Polegend Godnova
3 months ago

i don’t know why their tv doesn’t pull a san marino and leave everything in the hands of a sponsor, whether a person or a brand, that covers the participation costs. san marino gets a huge tourism boost from participating at esc: both from their national selection and from getting their name out there.

esc_fl
esc_fl
3 months ago

Come onnnn…I’m hoping for some surprise participants this year. Really miss Andorra at ESC

Nikki
Nikki
3 months ago

I’d love see other small countries at Eurovision, but I do think that it’s just feel too difficult for them.

San Marino manages because, you can say, they found a niche spot for themselves, they’re San Memerino, always a mix of fun, camp and cringe, and people loves them for it, but being San Marino’s thing, other countries, like Andorra here, probably feel they can’t just go with the same “we’re for the booze, and don’t care for the results” attitude.

Thallo
Thallo
3 months ago

I’d love to see any microstates that can’t compete due to financial problems join together and compete under the name of ‘Microstates of Europe’ or something.

Clara
Clara
3 months ago
Reply to  Thallo

That’d be fun

Thallo
Thallo
3 months ago
Reply to  Clara

It would! Luxembourg, Andorra and Monaco could all benefit, and so would Eurovision.

They can do the Belgian-type selection of letting broadcasters take turns sending an act. Hell, they could even host a national selection!