The EBU has released the split results of Eurovision 2013, revealing the average ranking each country received from the professional jury and televoters. Below is the combined matrix, followed by a breakdown by jury and televoters.

Overall Rank Country Points Avg. jury rank Avg. Televote rank
1 Denmark 281 6.23 4.97
2 Azerbaijan 234 7.77 5.86
3 Ukraine 214 8.74 5.66
4 Norway 191 8.23 7.14
5 Russia 174 9.67 6.84
6 Greece 152 12.28 6
7 Italy 126 9.46 11.7
8 Malta 120 9.54 10.97
9 Netherlands 114 9.05 11.7
10 Hungary 84 15.59 8.19
11 Moldova 71 8.69 16.57
12 Belgium 71 9.92 16.03
13 Romania 65 17.82 7.49
14 Sweden 62 8.05 16.19
15 Georgia 50 12.1 17.08
16 Belarus 48 16.15 14.11
17 Iceland 47 13.44 13.05
18 Armenia 41 14.44 15.11
19 U.K. 23 12.46 17.03
20 Estonia 19 13.41 19.59
21 Germany 18 15.44 15.81
22 Lithuania 17 17.95 16.73
23 France 14 10.95 21.68
24 Finland 13 13.77 16.68
25 Spain 8 19.64 22.92
26 Ireland 5 16.21 14.62

The EBU provides a detailed explanation of the complicated voting procedure on their web site, so we won’t detail it here. And while they give us the average ranking of the jury and televoters, they do not give us ordinal rankings. This is because points are tallied on the national level and not on the international level. Ireland came last overall despite having a higher average jury ranking than three countries (Romania, Lithuania, Spain) and a higher average televoting ranking in 12 countries. The point is this: To score points you need to be ranked within the Top 10 of a country’s national jury or a country’s national televote.

We have ranked countries by average televote rank and average jury rank below anyway.

Jury Rank Country Average Jury Rank Televote Rank Country Average Televote rank
1 Denmark 6.23 1 Denmark 4.97
2 Azerbaijan 7.77 2 Ukraine 5.66
3 Sweden 8.05 3 Azerbaijan 5.86
4 Norway 8.23 4 Greece 6
5 Moldova 8.69 5 Russia 6.84
6 Ukraine 8.74 6 Norway 7.14
7 Netherlands 9.05 7 Romania 7.49
8 Italy 9.46 8 Hungary 8.19
9 Malta 9.54 9 Malta 10.97
10 Russia 9.67 10 Italy 11.7
11 Belgium 9.92 11 Netherlands 11.7
12 France 10.95 12 Iceland 13.05
13 Georgia 12.1 13 Belarus 14.11
14 Greece 12.28 14 Ireland 14.62
15 U.K. 12.46 15 Armenia 15.11
16 Estonia 13.41 16 Germany 15.81
17 Iceland 13.44 17 Belgium 16.03
18 Finland 13.77 18 Sweden 16.19
19 Armenia 14.44 19 Moldova 16.57
20 Germany 15.44 20 Finland 16.68
21 Hungary 15.59 21 Lithuania 16.73
22 Belarus 16.15 22 U.K. 17.03
23 Ireland 16.21 23 Georgia 17.08
24 Romania 17.82 24 Estonia 19.59
25 Lithuania 17.95 25 France 21.68
26 Spain 19.64 26 Spain 22.92

Quick Thoughts

  • Denmark’s margin of victory with the jury (1.54) was larger than its margin of victory among televoters (0.69)
  • The jury gave Sweden’s Robin Stjernberg a lot of love. His average ranking put him in third place. His televoting average put him all the way down at 18
  • Moldova’s Aliona Moon did remarkably well with the jury, with her average ranking placing her fifth. She only came 19th with televoters. (See who the jury helped and hurt by clicking here).
  • We would have expected Ukraine’s Zlata Ognevich to do better with the juries than the public because of her stellar vocals. Apparently not. She came sixth with the jury, but second with the public
  • The same goes for Russia’s Dina Garipova. We thought the strength of her vocals would help her with the juries and that the public would be totes bored. But Dina came fifth with the public and only tenth with the jury. Looks like plagiarism allegations can hurt you in certain circles
  • Spain had the lowest international jury average ranking and the lowest international average televote ranking. Yet because they received more Top 10 finishes within specific countries they still finished ahead of Ireland’s Ryan Dolan. Sigh. Figuring out why he finished last just got a lot more complicated.
  • Italy performed the best of the Big 5, beating France, Germany, Spain and the U.K. with both the jury and the public.

Photo: Eurovision.tv (EBU)

 

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np
Guest
np

The audience gives always lots of points to Greece but not the jury… And that’s happenning almost every year! What’s the deal with the juries??

Henrik
Guest
Henrik

I don’t understand why so many people have difficulties understand why the results are as they are. To me it makes perfect sense that Ireland ended up last even if the televote rated him on place 14.62 and the jury on place 16.21 (that is by the way not so big difference). Ireland simply didn’t make it to top 10 in so many countries when combining jury an televote in the different countries. Also, even if we would have only televotes, the countries would not end up in the same order as they do when you rank them after the… Read more »

Tom
Guest
Tom

I just dont get how Ireland coming 23rd out of 26 and 14th out of 26 equals a last place finish…

Flotzu
Guest
Flotzu

I’m really upset about this confuse voting system. Especially the jury votes. Israel and San Marino 9th and 10th jury place in SF 2? AND Belgium 11th jury place in Final, WTF?! Did he hit one note?!

CookyMonzta
Guest
CookyMonzta

You’re right. Something ain’t right, about how Spain could be at the very bottom of both charts and Ireland ended up last in the final. Spain got points from 2 countries, while Ireland got points from 3. If they have the results of how each of the country’s juries ranked the contenders, and how each of the country’s televoters ranked them, can the results be converted to points for each side (jury and televotes), using the current points system, as was done with the split results right up until last year (when Sweden got 296 from the juries and 343… Read more »