Last week, Dutch Broadcaster NPO finally revealed how much money it needs to finance Eurovision 2020 in Rotterdam — €26.5 million! And because of that, the trio of Dutch broadcasters behind Eurovision had to submit a letter to the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science asking for additional funding.

Calculations showed that the host broadcaster needed €12.4 million to plug its funding deficit. And host broadcaster NPO strongly feels that the Dutch government should help close this gap. However, it was not guaranteed that the government will cough up the dosh. Shortly after the Netherlands’ victory in May, Prime Minister Mark Rutte made it clear that the government wouldn’t throw a bag of money at anyone.

Well now sources have revealed to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf that the Dutch cabinet has found a solution to cover the expenses.

Minister Slob, who is responsible for Media, wants to use the money that is received from The STER. The STER is responsible for the broadcast of radio and television advertisements on the public broadcaster NPO. The income generated from these advertisements cover the costs of public broadcasting. Unexpectedly, more revenue has been received this year than NPO has spent, meaning there’s a surplus to draw from.

Minister Slob is likely to let the better-than-expected STER revenues flow into the general reserves of the public broadcaster. This surplus has been compared to a general savings box, as it’s used to fund other events and cover setbacks that could unexpectedly affect the broadcaster more generally.

In the Lower House, members of the parliament wonder whether there will still be a sufficient amount money left in the savings box after millions of euros go toward the Eurovision Song Contest. So far there’s been no official announcement. But according to insiders speaking to De Telegraaf, it’s very likely that the cabinet will make a statement next week.

Do you expect the Dutch government to use the STER income for Eurovision? Or will another solution be found? Let us know what you think in the comment section down below!

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Robbert
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Robbert

It must be said that the above mentioned Telegraaf’ is an utter tabloid. It remains to be seen whether this news is real or fake. As the low chamber will still discuss it, the organisation could remain empty-handed. The solution could be a stretching out of the sponsor rules. In many cases the EBU dealt with her own rules in a very flexible way. Why not this time?

Alex
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Alex

Wow, if the Dutch struggle with money imagine if Bulgaria or Greece would win. I’m pretty sure that around a dozen countries wouldn’t be able to host the event, they can barely afford to participate, sometimes using third parties to find their act.

CookyMonzta
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CookyMonzta

I thought that, in such a case, it would go to the 2nd-place finisher. In the case of Greece, if they win, would Cyprus try to make a case for hosting in their place?

OrangeVorty
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OrangeVorty

Events such as Eurovision often have a positive impact on the local economy, culture and create a tourism bounce after the fact. Not only that the reputation of a county and city can improve no end with such positive exposure- it’s pleasing to see someone I. Government recognises the benefit and will support the festival.