Collage: ERR

Eesti Laul 2022 returns on Saturday for the second quarter-final. Broadcaster ERR has now revealed the ten acts who will compete at the weekend.

The line-up includes a number of familiar names from previous editions of Eesti Laul

Eesti Laul 2022 quarter-final two: Competing acts and songs

  • Andrei Zevakin feat. Grete Paia – “Mis nüüd saab”
  • An-Marlen – “Lõpuks muutub”
  • Desiree – “Siiani”
  • Helen – “Vaata minu poole”
  • Jyrise – “Plaksuta”
  • Kaia-Liisa Kesler – “Vaikus”
  • Meisterjaan – “Vahel lihtsalt”
  • Silver Jusilo – “Elu rüpes”
  • Triin Niitoja & Frants Tikerpuu – “Laululind”
  • Wiiralt – “Kuradile”

Three of the above acts are returning after previously competing in last year’s national final. Helen and Wiiralt both failed to make it out of their semi-finals, thus they’ll be hoping to progress further this time around.

Andrei Zevakin was also a participant of Eesti Laul 2021, where he finished fifth in the final alongside Pluuto with the song “Wingman”. For 2022, Andrei will be part of another duo, this time performing with Grete Paia. Grete is a returnee herself and she continues her pattern of competing at Eesti Laul every three years, having previously appeared in the 2013, 2016 and 2019 editions.

Eesti Laul 2018 alum Desiree returns for another go. She finished second to last in her semi-final that year.

Meisterjaan is back after finishing fifth in the final of the 2016 contest. Meanwhile, Triin Niitoja also finished fifth in the final when competing in 2015 – then she sang with John4, while this time she’s performing with Frants Tikerpuu.

All ten songs of the second quarter-final are set to be performed in Estonian – this is an English free zone!

We won’t be able to here the songs until the quarter-final itself. But we don’t have long to wait as quarter-final two of Eesti Laul 2022 takes place this Saturday 27 November at 20:35 CET (21:35 EET).

Uku Suviste and Tanja will host the quarter-final. Both are former Estonian Eurovision acts, with Uku being the country’s most recent representative from 2021, while Tanja competed at Eurovision in 2014.

Eesti Laul 2022 – Details

The popular national selection has expanded to include quarter-finals involving 40 competing songs for 2022. After 202 entries were submitted, this gave acts a one-in-five chance of making the show. Through the quarter-finals and semi-finals, ten acts will end up progressing to the grand final.

The dates for all seven Eesti Laul show have also been confirmed. All four preliminary heats will take place before Christmas, while the latter stages will take place in February. Unlike recent years, there will not be a gap between the semi-finals and final.

  • Quarter-final 1 — Saturday 20 November
  • Quarter-final 2 — Saturday 27 November
  • Quarter-final 3 — Saturday 4 December
  • Quarter-final 4 — Saturday 11 December
  • Semi-final 1 — Thursday 3 February
  • Semi-final 2 — Saturday 5 February
  • Grand final — Saturday 12 February

Are you excited about the line-up for quarter-final two of Eesti Laul 2022? Whose song are you most looking forward to hearing on Saturday? Sound off in the comments below!

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Raussen
Raussen
14 days ago

Masterjaan-genius returned

Mr X
Mr X
14 days ago

That isn´t real ! All songs in Estonian….

lasse braun
lasse braun
14 days ago
Reply to  Mr X

they have balls!
for me as german,the estonian language sounds very cool like hungarian or so.

BadWoolfGirl
BadWoolfGirl
13 days ago
Reply to  lasse braun

Well to be fair, Estonian, Finnishand Hungarian are actually part of the same language family, The Finnic Urgic group

Sabrina
Sabrina
14 days ago

I’m loving the amount of entries in Estonian. I just wish Eesti Laul’s website could already show us the lyrics of the songs as they normally do before the semifinals, so I could try my luck with a translator with the ones in their language.

Mr X
Mr X
14 days ago
Reply to  Sabrina

I love it too…..

sav001
sav001
13 days ago
Reply to  Sabrina

The only reason why there are so many songs in Estonia is because it was a rule for the national final that half the songs had to be in Estonian and the other half in another language.

lasse braun
lasse braun
14 days ago

meisterjaan could be the deal – the master of the jew’s harp is back!
🙂

T.J.
T.J.
14 days ago

This time it HAS to be Grete Paia! She deserves her spot on the ESC stage!

Raussen
Raussen
14 days ago
Reply to  T.J.

No chance

Regina Phalange
Regina Phalange
13 days ago
Reply to  Raussen

and who has a chance? Meisterjaan? We had to laugh.

moth
moth
13 days ago

girl we still don’t know the artists of the other 2 QFs

Whisker
Whisker
14 days ago

I’m hoping they’ll provide English translations for us ESCitizens.

Marx
Marx
14 days ago
Reply to  Whisker

Sadly nope. Estonian National Broadcaster even sometimes struggles to translate their Russian tv channel into Estonian. Especially whenever a video from their Russian channel ends up on the the main webpage of broadcaster (err.ee).

Whisker
Whisker
13 days ago
Reply to  Marx

I need to be realistic. There is a question of authors’ rights, who translates the lyrics and such. Time will tell.

BadWoolfGirl
BadWoolfGirl
13 days ago
Reply to  Whisker

If I have to wager a guess, the lyrics and their translations may only be released after the songs are released

Robyn Gallagher
Admin
14 days ago

In case anyone is wondering why there are so many songs in Estonian this year, it costs half as much to enter a song in Estonian. Early entry is €50 Estonian or €100 for another language; later entry is €100 Estonian, €200 other. It has been like this in recent years, but the prices went up this year so there may be even more of an incentive to enter a song in Estonian. As well, let’s not discount the impact of the ESC 2021 top three – all in national languages.

raw
raw
14 days ago

One of the ideas of the quarterfinals was to present more songs in Estonian. Estonians complain quite a lot about why so few Estonian-language songs have been selected for the semi-finals.

BadWoolfGirl
BadWoolfGirl
14 days ago
Reply to  raw

I didn’t know that, and maybe that explains why there were more Estonian songs qualifying for the semi finals two days ago. But this upcoming Saturday, regardless of who qualifies, there will be 8 Estonian and 2 English songs so far. There will probably be more English songs down the line.

raw
raw
14 days ago
Reply to  BadWoolfGirl

Yes, because there are only songs in foreign languages in the third quarterfinal. After that, the difference between songs in Estonian and foreign is almost non-existent (8 in Estonian, 7 foreign) – then it depends on the fourth quarter-final, which ones are more popular. 🙂

Mr X
Mr X
14 days ago

Absolutely and please don´t forget the fifth place for Ukraine (and the only english song in the Top 5 (Iceland) was great too)

Because for this reason the ESC 2021 for me was one of the best editions ever. Thank you Europe !

Kåre Eriksen
Kåre Eriksen
13 days ago
Reply to  Mr X

Iceland’s song was terrible. How the hell did they manage to be so high even without being live on stage

BadWoolfGirl
BadWoolfGirl
13 days ago
Reply to  Kåre Eriksen

Probably from residual hype of the 2020 entry. What would you rather see in the top five instead Iceland?

Mr X
Mr X
12 days ago
Reply to  BadWoolfGirl

Maybe this overrated entry from Malta ?????

Mr X
Mr X
12 days ago
Reply to  Mr X

OK, Lithuania is in my personal list at third position and Iceland has placing six.

Luc
Luc
8 days ago
Reply to  BadWoolfGirl

Maybe Finland or Lithuania tbh. 10 Years was underwhelming and didn’t live up to the quality and uniqueness of Think About Things

Mr X
Mr X
12 days ago
Reply to  Kåre Eriksen

No, terrible was for example Cyprus or Moldova…

esc_fl
esc_fl
14 days ago

Every song title in Estonian…can’t wait!!!!!

Jonas
Jonas
14 days ago
Reply to  esc_fl

They all look Estonian to me, but maybe the made-up language is in there somewhere.

Colin
Colin
14 days ago
Reply to  Jonas

I translated them from Estonian (speakers welcome to correct):

Mis nüüd saab – What now?
Lõpuks muutub – Eventually it changes
Siiani – So far
Vaata minu poole – Look at me
Plaksuta – Clap
Vaikus * – Children (Google translate claims it’s Lithuanian)
Vahel lihtsalt – Sometimes just
Elu rüpes – In the midst of life
Laululind – Songbird
Kuradile – Damn it

It appears like 9 songs are in Estonian, and one in Lithuanian, but some are possibly bilingual. In any case, I can’t wait! Also, Grete Paia is back, YES! 🙂

raw
raw
14 days ago
Reply to  Colin

“Vaikus” means “Silence”.
“Vaata minu poole” = “Look towards me”

“Kuradile” means more like “To Hell with it”, when you are angry at/with somebody/something (The word “Kurat” itself means “The Devil” or “Damn it”).

Last edited 14 days ago by raw
Colin
Colin
14 days ago
Reply to  raw

Thank you. 🙂

Marx
Marx
14 days ago
Reply to  Colin

Few fixes to the questionable translations that raw didn’t brought up..

Mis nüüd saab? – What happens now?
Lõpuks muutub? – At last it changes

GojoSatoru
GojoSatoru
13 days ago
Reply to  Colin

Google translate isn’t really a trustworthy source.

Colin
Colin
13 days ago
Reply to  GojoSatoru

In my experience, in most cases it gets its job done. Of course, sometimes it’s wrong, but most of the time it tends to be either right or at least delivering a kinda similar information (as most of the corrected titles do, actually). Usually, Croatian to English, and vice-versa is roughly okay. It should never be taken for granted, though, as some of these titles suggest. 🙂 It would be cool if the artists or Tv stations would provide the trustworthy translation of each song, but if no, sadly this is the best bet.

Jonas
Jonas
14 days ago

I’d like to know the songwriters too, not just the singers.

Liis
Liis
14 days ago
Reply to  Jonas

At the show ”Ringvaade” where the songs were announced on Monday they also had the writers mentioned

mamaaa oooh
mamaaa oooh
14 days ago

love love LOVE how all the songs here are in estonian. such a beautiful language and hope one makes it to the contest!

BadWoolfGirl
BadWoolfGirl
14 days ago

Holy crap, an all Estonian quarterfinal?! I didn’t expect that for the next quarter far, although I have been hoping for single language quarterfinals in order to ensure an equal number of Estonian and English/other language songs. There’ll probably have an all English quarterfinal, and then a mixed quarterfinal.

Last edited 14 days ago by BadWoolfGirl
raw
raw
14 days ago
Reply to  BadWoolfGirl

Eesti Laul 2022 quarterfinals:

1. Mixed languages (songs in Estonian and other languages)
2. Only in Estonian
3. Foreign languages only
4. Mixed languages (songs in Estonian and other languages)

BadWoolfGirl
BadWoolfGirl
14 days ago
Reply to  raw

Is that officially, or is that your best guess?

raw
raw
14 days ago
Reply to  BadWoolfGirl

This was said by Eesti Laul producer Tomi Rahula in an interview.

BadWoolfGirl
BadWoolfGirl
14 days ago
Reply to  raw

OK, it’s official. When did he say that?

raw
raw
14 days ago
Reply to  BadWoolfGirl

The video interview was released on November 21, but was most likely filmed on Saturday when the first quarterfinal took place.

Una
Una
14 days ago

WIIRALT – Tuuled <3 I am so excited to see what they’re bringing this year!!

moth
moth
14 days ago

meisterjaan yass parmupills!

DARONJA
14 days ago

Wow! All songs in Estonian? I didn’t expect it! I’m looking forward to this quarterfinal

zheng
zheng
14 days ago

Looks promising QF! All songs in Estonian, i really like it, excited to hear Triin Niitoja, Wiiralt, Grete Paia