Liverpool Eurovision 2023 UK

Eurovision fans, your expertise is required. Liverpool City Council is recruiting 500 volunteers to assist with the delivery of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023.

Volunteers are needed to help staff key points around the city and venue, including the Tourist Information Centre in Liverpool ONE shopping complex, the Eurovision Village on the Pier Head and at transport hubs.

Volunteer for Eurovision 2023 in Liverpool

Eurovision.tv announced around 500 roles have been created to support the delivery of the Eurovision 2023 this May. Volunteers are required for various period of time from Tuesday 25 April until Monday 15 May.

Volunteer roles include scanning event tickets and meeting and greeting visitors. If you’re craving to get stuck in with some of the artists, there will be positions “welcoming artists to backstage areas in the Eurovision Village.”

Will I get a free ticket to Eurovision?

If you’re looking for a free ticket to Eurovision, you’re out of luck. All of the 500 placements will be outside of the arena, around the city of Liverpool. They do not include free ticket benefits.

What are the requirements?

Liverpool City Council is especially interested in volunteers who can speak another language or two, other than English, due to the international nature of the event. If you speak Ukrainian, you may be already ahead of the competition.

The Eurovision team’s ambition is to “create a diverse and inclusive volunteering team, with a blend of local volunteers and volunteers with knowledge of the Ukrainian language and culture”.

Volunteers must have the right to work in the UK. If you’re travelling from abroad, you need a work visa.

Volunteers must be at least 18 years of age, be friendly and approachable and have good local knowledge. So if you are not from Liverpool, it’s time to swat up!

How do I volunteer for Eurovision 2023?

To volunteer, you can register your interest by visiting the Culture Liverpool website.

The closing date for applications is midnight, Tuesday 14 February.

Do you want to volunteer for the contest? What roles would you be interested in doing? Let us know in the comments.

46 Comments
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Jimmy
Jimmy
1 year ago

“Volunteers must have the right to work in the UK. If you’re travelling from abroad, you need a work visa.”

‘United By Music’ but at a very high price if you want to volunteer then.

The government should have given a special waiver for this, though I’m not surprised they haven’t. Asking European volunteers to pay for a work visa and the Immigration Health Surcharge, which combined will come to just under £1,000, simply to volunteer to help run Eurovision seems counterintuitive to the whole point of Eurovision.

Europotato
Europotato
1 year ago

Hahahaha they want volunteers but want people who speak multiple languages, especially Ukrainian but they need a work visa? Hahahahaha that and not even a thank you ticket? Good luck with your 3 volunteers.

Monica
Monica
1 year ago

In my opinion they should give something in reward. I been volunteering in Christian world meetings, kind of song festivals and they were giving food, accomodations and free tickets in the arenas according which is your responsibilities but we were helping to each other to see at least one the concert. Even non paid Christian organisations were doing it also to help volunteers. And it was the best approach for them too. Cause they are giving their time. I think at least something they should reward them, otherwise its not fair.

Zac
Zac
1 year ago

So I would literally have to spend my money on visa, accommodation, flight tickets and all and I wont be even able to get free ticket to the arena?
Good luck to them searching for people, I guess there wont be as many coming with nothing in reward…

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Zac

It’s volunteering. That’s something that isn’t done for self-benefit. More to enhance the community, and contribute to the atmosphere. If people are only applying for what they can get out of it, then they are the wrong people for the job.

Ari
Ari
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Yeah, you can’t expect a dirt poor corporation like the EBU to pay the people doing all the real work for them. I mean, that’s madness, paying people for work. Working is a privilege for grateful people and I’m so glad you understand that. EBU gold star for you. You can’t buy anything with that gold star, but doesn’t it feel great to get one? 🙂

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Ari

These in-person events are for a priviliged few. The people who go to every contest, and want the royal carpet rolled out for them… but also the actual people of Liverpool. They are not broadcast. Why should a broadcasting union pay for them? Their worry should be the viewers at home.

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Also, “volunteer” means just that. Nobody is forced.

Ari
Ari
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Nobody is forced to do unpaid internships either. That doesn’t make it better.

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Ari

I could argue that people, young people, actually are forced to do unpaid internships. By the market. If they want to progress in life, they must lower their integrity. Sad, but true. This is just a two week thing for Liverpool, not quite the same.

Ari
Ari
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Not quite the same, but essentially the same result nevertheless. Unpaid work.

Ari
Ari
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Because this volunteering includes being there for the artists who ARE the show. You know, those people who you see performing on your screen.

Jason
Jason
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Imagine thinking wanting to get paid or at least having accommodations while working is “having the red carpet” rolled out for you. The 18th century called they want their talking points back.

Sergio
Sergio
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

I understand that, but if someone really loves eurovision and wants to contribute volunteering at least give them free entrance to the shows or any other reward

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Sergio

This is the city of Liverpool asking for volunteers, not BBC or EBU. Loving Liverpool should be the motive, I think.

Jonny B
Jonny B
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Let’s be honest here, everyone does things to ultimately benefit themselves. It might not be the main motivation, but it’s definitely a factor in every decision. Even helping an old lady across the road isn’t entirely selfless as you get a boost to your mood knowing you did a nice act/the right thing.

Karl
Karl
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonny B

“Even helping an old lady across the road isn’t entirely selfless as you get a boost to your mood knowing you did a nice act/the right thing.”

Only a narcissist would feel this way.

Devito
1 year ago
Reply to  Karl

While thinking so might be wrong, I have to second Jonny B on that. Even if you do, say, a task because you feel the need to help a helpless person, it still means you’re doing a selfish act. And you do it subconsciously to fulfill your inner voice’s request. It’s not as bad and obvious as, for instance, “I’m going to do this because when I get this,” but that doesn’t make it selfless either. May I quote Joey Tribbiani, who once said, “There’s no such thing as an unselfish good deed”.

Karl
Karl
1 year ago
Reply to  Devito

Even if you do, say, a task because you feel the need to help a helpless person, it still means you’re doing a selfish act.”

Only a narcissist would feel this way.

Ari
Ari
1 year ago
Reply to  Karl

Only a hypocrite would not be able to realize the truth of that statement.

Jonny B
Jonny B
1 year ago
Reply to  Karl

Cut the narcissist quips and engage with the debate Karl. Please provide examples of everyday things that are entirely selfless.

Have you ever held the door for someone, only for them to not say ‘thank you’ or acknowledge you? Why do you think it feels bad when they don’t?

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonny B

Some people go out to pick litter off the streets, or sweep up leaves. Often nobody notices.

Jonny B
Jonny B
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

That just links in with the ‘do a good act, you get a mood boost’ that I was talking about. In addition to a more positive perception of yourself as someone civic minded who looks out for the environment. Not to mention that you also benefit from cleaner streets albeit in a very minor way.

Ari
Ari
1 year ago
Reply to  Devito

Truth! I always think of that Joey scene when I’m having this argument with someone. Joey was right and Phoebe was wrong.

Jonny B
Jonny B
1 year ago
Reply to  Karl

Give an example of what you consider to be an entirely selfless act.

Jimmy
Jimmy
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonny B

Martyrdom is, arguably, an example of an entirely selfless act. The ideas you’re grappling with are part of a long philosophical debate on whether egoism or altruism defines the human condition. It’s philosophy, not science, so trying to assert that one view is ‘definitive’ is fruitless. For that reason, I’ve always thought the human condition is both – and neither, if we consider nihilism – and much more beyond. Between egoism and altruism, there’s probably a spectrum, and I think that spectrum is visible even in the responses here in this thread, such as those who want to be more… Read more »

Jonny B
Jonny B
1 year ago
Reply to  Jimmy

Could be yes, although there’s some who would love to be released from this mortal coil by going out in a way that has them become forever enshrined with a cause/infamous for their unshakeable belief, even if their direct experience of that is rather dull.

I will read up further on your points – thanks for contributing to the debate.

Jimmy
Jimmy
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonny B

If they so wish to be released, they’re unlikely to find themselves in positions of martydom, which are rarely found entirely by chance. Being forever enshrined might fit someone like Joan of Arc, who willingly burned for her beliefs, but doesn’t fit, for example, in cases of soldiers sacraficing themselves to save their comrades, or teachers in the US who put themselves in front of gunmen to save their students, or parents skipping meals during a cost of living crisis to ensure that their child eats. The instinct here is to protect others, not to preserve oneself, which I think… Read more »

Jimmy
Jimmy
1 year ago
Reply to  Jimmy

Also, it’s worth considering that psychological egoism – the notion that there is no selfless act and that humans are inherently selfish – is so simplistic and reductive that it makes the concept of ‘selfishness’ useless. To be self-interested, to be selfish, has a specific meaning. It means someone who prioritises themselves without concern for others or to the detriment of others. If the premise of psychological egoism is that humans are all inherently self-interested, what does that prove? If soldiers sacraficing themselves and parents going hungry to feed their children are technically selfish and can’t ultimately be distinguished from… Read more »

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonny B

Organ donation?

BadWoolfGirl
BadWoolfGirl
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonny B

Or you might be helping a little old lady out because she might genuinely need help and you want to make her life easier for her for a little bit. I was in line checking out groceries last week and a lady in a power chair behind me had a hand basket full of heavy stuff on her lap. I had thought about helping her, but I didn’t wanna overstep my boundaries and while I was pondering my decision to ask her, she actually piped up and asked for help, and I was more than happy to lift her basket… Read more »

Jonny B
Jonny B
1 year ago
Reply to  BadWoolfGirl

This just lends further credence to my point. You said “you want to make her life easier”, and doing so makes you feel good. You then get a better mood and opinion of yourself for doing a good act – that is the reward I was implying in my hypothetical scenario.

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonny B

I see your point, but it’s not always true. An 89 year old woman asked me for help recently, her television had broken. It really did not suit me at that particular moment, but I went even though I did not want to. I “fixed” the television in about twenty seconds, the thing had been plugged out. Then she kept me talking, showing me photos of her family and telling me how long she had been widowed. She did not want me to leave. It was only afterwards that I was glad I went.

Jonny B
Jonny B
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

I think consciously or unconsciously, you agreed to help that person for an ultimate benefit for yourself. Again I’m not saying that was the main motivation, but it was in my view a factor. Whether that be the expectation that you would feel good you did a good act after you completed it, or perhaps even the increased expectation that you might have people who will assist you when you get old, I can only speculate.

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonny B

Maybe subconsciously I was worried what people would think if I didn’t help her. Possible, but I’m still glad I did.

Jimmy
Jimmy
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

“I was worried what people would think if I didn’t help her.”

Which people? Now I can imagine some dramatic scene, that you were in the middle of a busy public square and the old woman called out ‘will anyone help me fix my broken TV?…you! please help me!’ and as she points directly at you, all the people of the town stop and stare.

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Jimmy

It was subconscious, so I don’t know! All the people peeking through their curtains, or my grandparents looking down on me…

Jimmy
Jimmy
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

I can only think that they’d be proud and that you don’t have to worry about that.

Jimmy
Jimmy
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Two good deeds in one. It sounds like she enjoyed having some company and that’s kind that you gave more time than you would have liked to spare.

Curious, how do you know she was 89? Did she say?

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Jimmy

She asked me to guess her age, which of course I did not. She was proud to be 90 soon, and surprised to have lived that long considering she is a chronic smoker.

Jimmy
Jimmy
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Sweet, she’s doing well. Most importantly, did you encourage her to vote for Loreen on 25 February?

Jonas
Jonas
1 year ago
Reply to  Jimmy

Now we have gotten to the real subconscious reason for this -the elderly have the most power on the age-based voting system. Solved!

Jimmy
Jimmy
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

Should you really have fixed her TV, Jonas.

Europotato
Europotato
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonas

One good turn deserves another. Especially when it’s a multi million pound company asking like the EBU.

Frisian esc
1 year ago
Reply to  Zac

I guess they mostly assume local liverpudlians to volunteer.

Karl
Karl
1 year ago

Pay them!