PHOTO: EBU / CORINNE CUMMING

The BBC put out a call for Eurovision 2023 host city applications, and in recent weeks a total of 20 cities submitted their “expressions of interest”. As part of this they were required to demonstrate how the city would reflect and celebrate Ukrainian culture in the show and surrounding events. Twenty cities responded with their vital details — from available arenas to available hotel rooms. Now, with the announcement of the host city shortlist, we know which seven cities are still in the race…

EBU Executive Supervisor Martin Osterdahl joined Zoe Ball on her Radio 2 breakfast show on Friday morning, and Scott Mills had the honour of revealing the list. The announcement was simultaneously broadcast on BBC 1’s flagship morning show Breakfast. It’s safe to say the Brits are riding a love wave following Sam Ryder’s second-place finish and the incoming party next May. As Scott pointed out during the announcement: “It’s exciting that we’re talking about Eurovision in August.”

But anyway, the seven cities are…

Eurovision 2023: BBC host city shortlist includes these 7 cities

  • Birmingham
  • Glasgow
  • Leeds
  • Liverpool
  • Manchester
  • Newcastle
  • Sheffield

Birmingham

The floated venue for Birmingham’s bid, The Resorts World Arena, is located in Solihull, and has a capacity of up to 15,000. The arena is located opposite the Resorts World Birmingham, an entertainment complex which features the largest casino in the United Kingdom as well as a shopping mall.

The Arena has also hosted major events in recent times, including ITV’s Concert for Ukraine in March, BBC Sports Personality of the Year in 2010, 2016 and 2018 as well as the BBC Music Awards in 2015. Earlier this month it hosted the Commonwealth Games. 

Glasgow

Mirroring the results on our informal Twitter and YouTube polls, Glasgow came out on top of our initial Eurovision 2023 host city poll with more than 21% of the vote. The city’s OVO Hydro Arena remains a fan favourite — partly because of its appearance in the Netflix hit Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga — but also because Scotland hasn’t hosted Eurovision since 1972 (and that time it was in Edinburgh). The city proved its ability to hold large-scale events at last year’s COP26 summit.

Leeds

It would be amiss of us to talk about famous Loiners without mentioning those who have graced the Eurovision stage. Leeds even proudly holds a gold and silver medal from the Olympics of song. Sandra Stevens took the trophy back to the UK after winning Eurovision 1976 as a member of Brotherhood of Man. One year later, Mike Moran claimed second place at the 1977 contest alongside his duet partner Lynsey de Paul.

Caroline Barnes put Leeds back on the Eurovision map when representing the United Kingdom in 2007 as part of pop quartet Scooch. We can also thank Leeds for bringing together the Czech Republic’s Eurovision 2022 group We Are Domi — Dominika Hašková, Casper Hatlestad and Benjamin Rekstad met whilst studying at Leeds College of Music — and the trio have shown their support for bringing Eurovision to Leeds in 2023.

Liverpool

Harry Doyle — Assistant Mayor and Cabinet Member for Culture and Visitor Economy — said:

“Making a major event like this possible in such a short timeframe is complicated and is going to need some careful and creative planning, but we think Liverpool would be the perfect stage to celebrate this unique Eurovision.”

The Beatles aren’t Liverpool’s sole musical export. As the only UNESCO City of Music in England, Liverpool has been commended for its contributions to the musical arts. Liverpool homes a wealth of concert halls and music venues, encompassing genres and styles from around the world. The city’s annual Africa Oyé festival in the largest celebration of African music in the country, attracting over 50,000 people to Liverpool’s Sefton Park every June. Elsewhere, the city is the stomping grounds of many British music greats, including Cilla Black, Atomic Kitten, The Wombats, Elvis Costello, Echo & The Bunnymen, The Coral, and Melanie C of The Spice Girls. 

Manchester

It’s home to the world-famous Manchester Arena, which has hosted everyone who is anyone in pop music. The BBC recently moved its Eurovision production hub to the BBC’s facilities in Salford, just outside the city. AJ Odudu even delivered the UK’s 12 points from the area last year. Manchester Arena is currently undergoing major renovation work, but it’s likely they can figure out a workaround and put that on pause.

Newcastle

The Utilita Arena Newcastle has a capacity of 11,000 and has hosted global acts including Janet Jackson, Rihanna, Beyonce, and Lady Gaga. 

City Councillor Alex Hay of the Newcastle City Council stressed to The Chronicle that the city wants to show support for Ukraine, which can’t host the contest because of Russia’s ongoing war.

“We are delighted to be bidding to host Eurovision 2023 on behalf of Ukraine and stand in solidarity with its people. We are collaborating with partners across the region to help make this a reality for Newcastle, to do Ukraine proud and to embody everything that Eurovision stands for.”

“We’re committed to making Newcastle a better place for our residents and visitors, and hosting Eurovision will be a crucial tool in achieving that.”

Sheffield

The city of steel proposes using the Utilita Sheffield Arena, which has a capacity of around 13,600. Since opening in 1991, the venue has welcomed around 14 million people. That includes a lot of hockey fans: It’s home to the Sheffield Steelers ice hockey club. One Direction actually gave their very last performance here before going on hiatus in 2015. In a statement, the city council said:

“Sheffield stands in solidarity with Ukraine and the Ukrainian people, including those we have long been linked with in our twinned city Donetsk.”

“Sheffield has a proven reputation for hosting major international events – recently including UEFA Women’s EURO 2022, as well as hosting the World Snooker Championship for over 45 years. Later this year, Sheffield will host the Rugby League World Cup, as well as the prestigious figure skating grand prix, the MK John Wilson Trophy.”

 
 
 
 
 
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Poll: Who should host Eurovision 2023? 

You can vote for as many cities as you like, but you can only submit your votes ONE time.

How is the Eurovision host city chosen?

The cities will now submit more detailed proposals and whoever “scores highest against the BBC’s criteria” will be named host city. Scott said we can expect an announcement in the autumn.

The BBC chooses the host city in conjunction with the European Broadcasting Union, the body that oversees Eurovision. As in recent years, the main criteria are…

  • A venue with a capacity for at least 10,000 spectators
  • A nearby international airport 
  • Hotel accommodation for 2,000 people

On top of this, we know from recent editions that the EBU requires a press centre for 1,500 journalists. However, as we saw in Turin, cost-cutting has led the EBU to dramatically slash that number. There were only 500 journalists allowed in the press room at Eurovision 2022. 

Last year, Italian broadcaster Rai stipulated that the host city must have a venue that is available for six weeks before the event, two weeks during the show and a week after the end of the show for dismantling. 

Importantly, this year the host city must emphasise how it will reflect Ukrainian culture. 

Eurovision 2023 host city: Full BBC statement

Today the BBC confirmed the outcome of the first stage of the Host City bidding process for the 67th Eurovision Song Contest to be held in the United Kingdom in 2023.

The BBC had expressions of interest from 20 cities, across all four Nations of the UK. All applicants demonstrated how they would reflect Ukrainian culture, music and communities to mark the fact that Ukraine are the winners of this year’s Eurovision Song Contest.

Seven cities have been shortlisted based on their ability to meet a set of minimum requirements that demonstrate they have the capacity, capability and experience to host an event of this scale and complexity. Given the short period of time available until the event will be staged, the selection process was heavily weighted towards demonstrating past experience in hosting major international events, as well as being able to demonstrate their credentials in hosting a celebration of contemporary music.

The Host City selection process is a two-stage process and these seven cities will now go through to the second and final stage, where they will be asked to develop their bids in more detail. The selection of the Host City for the Eurovision Song Contest 2023 will be decided by the BBC in conjunction with the EBU, and the successful city will be announced in the Autumn.

The final decision on the winning Host City will be determined by which city or region scores highest against an agreed evaluation criteria, assessed by the BBC. These criteria include: having a suitable venue and sufficient space to deliver the requirements of the Song Contest; the commitment that can be made by a city or region to hosting the event, including the financial contribution; the strength of the cultural offer which includes off screen local and regional activity as well as showcasing Ukrainian culture and music; and alignment with the BBC’s strategic priorities as a public service broadcaster, such as providing value to all audiences and supporting the creative economy in the UK.

Kate Phillips, BBC’s Director Unscripted Content says: “We would like to thank all of the cities and regions that submitted bids to host next year’s Eurovision Song Contest. We have seven fantastic cities who we are taking through to the next round.”

“Congratulations to Birmingham, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle and Sheffield – it’s exciting to see such a breadth of bids going through from across the UK. We are committed to delivering a truly unique Song Contest that celebrates wonderful Ukraine and champions British music and creativity in all its diversity.”

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Pauly
Pauly
1 month ago

Disappointing selection of cities but we all know it will be between Manchester and Glasgow. It will depend on the final bids/proposals

I think Glasgow is the frontrunner with Manchester as second option. Both big cities (not chaotic though) with decent arenas.

Stephanie
Stephanie
1 month ago

Please let it be GLASGOW!!!

Devito
1 month ago

Manchester, mainly because it presents arena with the largest capacity of 21K. Not sure why Glasgow with only 14,5K seats is a favourite to win the bidding. Also, Cardiff would have been epic with its 74K seats in the Principality Stadium, sad it dropped the bidding. I see the political opposition as to why Glasgow shall not be picked to represent the whole UK when Scotland is hoping to separate from the union in the next few years. Not that Scottish people don’t have the right to reap the benefits of the union, but it rather looks like a slap… Read more »

Ed the walrus
Ed the walrus
1 month ago
Reply to  Devito

On the independence issue, I think that actually counts in Glasgow’s favour. Both the UK government and Scottish government think their side will get a boost from hosting there (look at this event you have got from being part of the UK/ look at how well Scotland can do on the global stage) so it will have support from both (plus city government), like COP did, and the BBC will also want to shore up its image in Scotland, although it needs to level up within England too. Along with Birmingham and Manchester it feels like the most obvious overall… Read more »

Dndndndjd
Dndndndjd
1 month ago
Reply to  Devito

I agree with Manchester considering this will be the first contest free of covid measures (hopefully) getting the most amount of people into the arena will be key

SquarePegg
SquarePegg
1 month ago
Reply to  Devito

venue size doesn’t matter to me, in fact I’ve preferred the contests in recent years in a smaller venue. I also like venues that are not of the typical arena shape as it forces more originality when it comes to stage design and allows for more “personality” in the overall look of the contest on the screen I appreciate a larger venue means more capacity and either brings down ticket prices or brings in more cash to help cover costs, but a few thousand seats here and there doesn’t make much of a difference. As much as I love Manchester… Read more »

Jo.
Jo.
1 month ago

it’s between Manchester and Glasgow, me thinks

Pedro
Pedro
1 month ago

I seriously hope it’s Glasgow. The north of England is seriously one of the most grim and depressing regions in Europe, I can’t imagine who would enjoy spending time in these post industrial grey cities.

Scotland on the other hand is wonderful + at least they’re not anti European. If it’s in Glasgow I’ll at least consider going and spending some timing driving around Scotland.

Henno
Henno
1 month ago
Reply to  Pedro

Pedro, your constant negative opinions are worth less that dog muck. Go post somewhere else, as I would imagine none of us could care less what you think. Please do not come to the UK, including Scotland.

Pedro
Pedro
1 month ago
Reply to  Henno

You care enough to post an answer, and no offence but I’ll travel wherever I want without needing the permission of some anonymous online comment. The Karen-like nerve to think that you can just go online and tell people where they can or can’t travel though, lol…

Henno
Henno
1 month ago
Reply to  Pedro

I’m not telling you where you can and can’t travel. That would be preposterous. I will call you out for being complete and utter troll, however. There are thousands reading these comment who were born and raised in said ‘post indusrial grey cities’ – and they are actually anything but. So take your contrived, skewed 5-minute visit opinion somwhere else, because you don’t have a clue what you’re talking about. And once again, please don’t come to the UK.

Devito
1 month ago
Reply to  Pedro

British people still have imperialistic thoughts to this day. That’s why they voted to leave the EU. It doesn’t mean British people are anti-European, europhobic, etc. In fact, I think their membership was doomed from the very start. Additionally, there are fewer nations against the federalisation of the EU, so in the long term, we can strengthen the unity in the union and hopefully compete against our common foes in China and/or in friendly battling with the USA as a united entity. Now, if we can somehow arrange Hunexit, we will be able to talk about the European Union’s Constitution… Read more »

Euroboitoy
Euroboitoy
1 month ago
Reply to  Devito

Just as an FYI, not all of us voted to leave the EU.

Penny Bleta
Penny Bleta
1 month ago
Reply to  Euroboitoy

You should have. What EU has to offer to anyone but misery much less UK. You don’t need them. Stay away from these leeches. If we could we would as well.

SquarePegg
SquarePegg
1 month ago
Reply to  Pedro

YAWN

The Voice of Reason
The Voice of Reason
1 month ago

Birmingham is slept on HARD. They are a great city full of great people and people complaining about the venue don’t realise that it’s way more confortable for the viewer sitting inside the stadium than the other stadiums which are very crammed in and have little leg room. In addition, it would be a nice comprimise since its in the Midlands so you would still have some southern influence there. Shame that there weren’t many towns or cities in the south who applied or got shortlisted since so much of our actual population comes from there but here we go.… Read more »

UpinSpaceFan
UpinSpaceFan
1 month ago

Agree. Birmingham has by far the strongest case imo.

Þórir
Þórir
1 month ago

I’m going to call it being Glasgow or Manchester from this

XCF
XCF
1 month ago

I absolutely love how BBC informs about the process as it goes, very efficient.

Eurovision fan
Eurovision fan
1 month ago
Reply to  XCF

Unlike sleepy RAI

Luke B
Luke B
1 month ago
Reply to  XCF

Makes a pleasant change. Usually they’re very hush-hush about Eurovision until the last minute. I guess they’re being transparent because of the sensitivities around the license-fee.

Azuro
Azuro
1 month ago

Taking Eurovision out of Kyiv and sticking it in Glasgow for SAFETY concerns would be the ultimate troll.

You can walk the streets of Kyiv safely at night.

Like taking it away from the Netherlands because you’re worried about flooding then sticking it in Venice!

Catriona
Catriona
1 month ago
Reply to  Azuro

Glasgow is safe. No less so than any other big city in the UK.

Robbie
Robbie
1 month ago
Reply to  Azuro

What a lot of tosh. I’m a Glaswegian and so very insulted by your comment. It is such a friendly city, and everyone speaks to each other and are so welcoming. I have never felt unsafe and find it bright, vibrant and very culturally diverse. It is a beautiful city to pot – great architecture, lots of green open space and to top it off the people are without doubt the most genuine, friendly and proud people in the country. I lived in London for 18 years and Manchester for 3 : never met so many rude people as I… Read more »

Richard
Richard
1 month ago
Reply to  Robbie

Well done Robbie, you’ve presented a compelling case for your home city. Glasgow has a great chance to host and your comments make me want to go even more!

Whisker
Whisker
1 month ago
Reply to  Robbie

! EXCELLENT COMMENT !

SquarePegg
SquarePegg
1 month ago
Reply to  Robbie

well said. I’ve never been to Glasgow but its on my list. I have only ever heard great things and that is echoed by the support Glasgow is getting in the polls to host

Frisian esc
Frisian esc
1 month ago
Reply to  Azuro

Didn’t you want London to host azuro?

Lawrence Gibb
1 month ago
Reply to  Azuro

I rarely get involved in these spats but I am outraged by your post. Glasgow is currently in the top ten safest cities in the UK while Manchester is 5th in the list of most dangerous cities in the country. I have no idea where you’re from but you clearly need to get your facts straight.

Euroboitoy
Euroboitoy
1 month ago
Reply to  Azuro

Racist comment

Jack
Jack
1 month ago

With regards to the up and coming Eurovision Song contest in The UK, I would like to propose that to spread the costs, at this time of global financial restraint, that the UK be able to hold the competition in 3 different venues (say Glasgow, Liverpool & Birmingham). Each venue would have say 12-13 countries, drawn by lot, switching between the various venues to go live and streamed to the other venues on large screens. I think this would also allow a lot more people access to the energy and excitement of the competition, as one venues would possible only… Read more »

Dndndndjd
Dndndndjd
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack

I personally disagree that would probably end up costing much more to host in 3 locations rather than 1 between the cost of venue and advertisement it wouldn’t be feasible, for example if the choose Manchester the arena there has space for around 20k that’s 60k and then there’s possible controversy around countries preference of cities

Jack
Jack
1 month ago
Reply to  Dndndndjd

It may cost more in total, but you have spread the cost, to 3 venues, are people going to be happy, in the present climate, that their council tax is being spent on something like this. The numbers I used were just examples, countries don’t choose it is either seeded or balloted..

Dndndndjd
Dndndndjd
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack

Yes I think people would be happy to see their council tax being spent on something like this especially struggling business’ which would get much more business whereas if it was spread out they wouldn’t get as much

Joshua
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack

Having it hosted in three different locations would do the absolutely OPPOSITE of reducing or spreading costs, I’m afraid

Jack
Jack
1 month ago
Reply to  Joshua

See above..

Luke B
Luke B
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack

Just wouldn’t work, I’m afraid. It would require designing, constructing, and paying for 3 separate stages, for a start. Then there’s the issue of moving the crew from one city to the next. The format of the whole contest would need to be shaken up. I understand what you’re getting at, but it’d be a logistical nightmare. And it’s unlikely to make things cheaper, for anyone. Each city would still need a fully-fitted-out arena, a set, accommodation, Eurovision village, and so on. Time constraints for planning also don’t help.

vetrina
vetrina
1 month ago

Only one Scottish city made it to the final shortlist?! Thus, I’m guessing Liverpool and Leeds have the most potential to be selected rn!

Catriona
Catriona
1 month ago
Reply to  vetrina

Leeds and Liverpool above Glasgow! What makes you think that? Glasgow is the strong favourite.

vetrina
vetrina
1 month ago
Reply to  Catriona

Only one out of the seven shortlisted cities is non-English. It is weird that Aberdeen and Edinburgh didn’t make it! Maybe the BBC want to keep it in England!

Luke B
Luke B
1 month ago
Reply to  vetrina

Edinburgh doesn’t have a big enough arena, and Aberdeen is too far out of the way. If the BBC didn’t want Glasgow, they wouldn’t have included it in the shortlist. They weren’t afraid to exclude London, remember.

Karl
Karl
1 month ago

I feel like Eurovision 2023 will feel more Ukrainian than Kyiv 2017 :/

I mean, I get it, but the UK is paying for it.

Esc addict
Esc addict
1 month ago
Reply to  Karl

You know exactly who will pay for what? How you can be so sure that Ukraine and others countries won’t contribute? However the UK has accepted the offer to host consciously with the Ukraine situation and their esc victory in mind.

vetrina
vetrina
1 month ago
Reply to  Karl

The host city will benefit the most though!

Esc addict
Esc addict
1 month ago

Liverpool. Seeing how Ukraine is treated by the eurofans I’d love to see Liverpool transformed in a little Ukraine during Eurovision. It would close the mouths of some people who doesn’t understand the Eurovision spirit, and of some people who have still not understand that Ukraine has won the last edition.

Þórir
Þórir
1 month ago
Reply to  Esc addict

Thats irrelevant. What matters is that Ukraine got the most votes and therefore still very much won the contest

Esc addict
Esc addict
1 month ago
Reply to  Esc addict

So Ukraine has won only because of the war and Spain was top 3 only because of Chanel’s ass, isn’t it?

Esc addict
Esc addict
1 month ago
Reply to  Esc addict

“False first” lol it doesn’t exist.
“Technically advanced performance ever” a pan and a stroboscope?
Ukraine deserve nothing and Spain everything ok we get it.

Paul R
Paul R
1 month ago

As a capital city meeting all the requirements London should at least have been on that short list.
so with all they citys and entertainment venues in the UK and the long it has waited to stage eurovision,even just by chance,it could be back to Birmingham again

Paul R
Paul R
1 month ago

I thought Belfast would have at least been on the shortlist.Not my personal choice of city but this may or may not have played a factor under public transportation.There is a chronic shortage of taxis in N.Ireland for some years due to testing requirements on new/first time drivers joining the industry.Covid made it worse and reduced numbers even further with many exsisting drivers leaving and not returning.
Belfast even at off peak times can be impossible to get a taxi
Did this affect its chance?

Joshua
1 month ago
Reply to  Paul R

Having been to the city, I’d say blaming taxis might be the “diplomatic” reason as to why Belfast wasn’t short listed.

Þórir
Þórir
1 month ago
Reply to  Paul R

I think its more the whole “hosting a British event with a fair share of Union Jacks and the like in a city and region where half the population is staunchly opposed to that stuff” thing that meant Belfast was never realistic contender tbh

Dawid
Dawid
1 month ago

Living in the south west, i wish Bristol made the cut. The nearest city, Birmingham is 4 hours away, meanwhile return trip to Glasgow costs hundreds of pounds.

Paul R
Paul R
1 month ago
Reply to  Dawid

No matter where in europe eurovision goes it will always involve travel for most in the host nation

Una
Una
1 month ago

I watched the announcement. What a jolly experience!! The excitement of the BBC and the British feels *real*!!!

Jonas
Jonas
1 month ago

I completely understand London not being there. It gets enough attention already.

Jamie
Jamie
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonas

London is the most boring city in UK.

Harry
Harry
1 month ago
Reply to  Jamie

I have to agree. I was only there once, but it really is just your average big city with some landmarks sprinkled in. I, for myself, enjoyed Brighton much more, it is such a charming city!

Madhat
Madhat
1 month ago
Reply to  Jamie

I disagree. If you view London as one whole city, I’d see why you think it’s boring – it is a MASSIVE city. I like to look at London as a collection of mini towns and villages. It has its alleyways, parks, canals, shopping districts, finance districts, the most diverse and trendy food shops in Europe, anything that you ask for. It is definitely not boring. It’s just plain huge. I’m very happy ESC won’t be hosted there though, there’s enough going on already and it’s the city that least needs an economic boost such as hosting ESC.

Philip
Philip
1 month ago

Its got to be Newcastle Its got the transportation links in terms of Airport, It also has a direct Ferry link to the continent to just outside of Amsterdam. Easy access on the trains from London and Edinburgh. The city is small enough that everything will be close by – You can have the arena zone, the pink triangle zone (Cities Gay bars) then you can have the Euro Village Zone in Leazes/Exhibition Park or on the Town Moor if they want a large scale. They can use the Quayside and have events down by the river too like they… Read more »

Thallo
Thallo
1 month ago
Reply to  Philip

London isn’t ”too big” for Eurovision.

If Istanbul and Moscow can host, so can London. Note that Istanbul and Moscow are Europe’s 1st and 2nd largest cities, whilst London is 3rd.

Also, London has one of the most efficient public transport systems in the world. Getting from A to B isn’t a problem in London or any other major world city.

Joshua
1 month ago
Reply to  Philip

Not sure how a few sailings to “just outside of Amsterdam” would seal the deal…

HarpyDarper
HarpyDarper
1 month ago

I’m so excited for all these choices! Maybe not so much Birmingham, but that’s nearest to me. All cities have great potential for a memorable event! Two points I want to raise first: All these arenas have concerts/events scheduled for April/May next year, how difficult or expensive is it to reschedule? Would it go against any pre set agreements these places have made? Or is ESC such a special event that they’d bend over backwards to accommodate it? Also, what is the extent of Manchester Arenas renovation? A pick of paint? Would they have to put it off until after… Read more »

Nathan
Nathan
1 month ago

Guys there’s no evidence that London even submitted a bid so let’s just relax. Seven great cities made the cut and that’s a great thing

Joshua
1 month ago
Reply to  Nathan

“great” might be stretching it….

Hector
Hector
1 month ago

I know it was among the least “suitable” places but I’m sad Belfast didn’t make the cut. I always enjoy it when smaller cities get the chance to host, even now that Eurovision has become such a huge event. Same goes for Aberdeen and Bristol, they were really excited about the project. Surprised not to see London though.

I don’t have a favourite city of the remaining 7, but I’d like it if Birmingham was not the chosen one as they’ve already had that honour. Good luck to all of them though!

TJCat
TJCat
1 month ago

I think it’s fine to feel disappointed certain cities didn’t make it though especially the ones we have an emotional or physical connection to. But with only months to plan (unlike other large events such as the games) maybe it’s right they go for a city that already has great infrastructure and facilities. While I wouldn’t wave a flag for london I agree it’s sad not to see the capital in the final cities, but what we don’t know is what london put forward as their options and vision. London has massive arenas but we already know they have to… Read more »

Eurovision fan
Eurovision fan
1 month ago

I’m picking Liverpool. Home to Beatles and famous English football club + UNESCO City of Music. They could make great Eurovision story with it. 🙂

Joshua
1 month ago
Reply to  Eurovision fan

I also agree, I think Liverpool would be legendary

Lydia
Lydia
1 month ago

Manchester or Liverpool would be my preferences location-wise, but I would be pretty happy with any of them

Im so fab
Im so fab
1 month ago

Glasgow should host, taking into account how much they want to stay in the EU, while the English dudes voted for Brexit.
Give Eurovision to someone who follow the European values.

Coda
1 month ago
Reply to  Im so fab

There is a big difference between European values and EU values.
(Btw I was one of the millions who voted to remain in the EU)

Azuro
Azuro
1 month ago
Reply to  Im so fab

EU has nothing to do with Eurovision.
2 recent hosts, Israel and Ukraine both non EU members.

Nathan
Nathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Im so fab

1 – Please leave toxic political opinions out of Eurovision.
2 – EU does not equal “European values”. If that were the case then Iceland, Norway, Switzerland etc. wouldn’t have European values.
3 – This is just puerile Anglophobia and you know it.

Jay
Jay
1 month ago

Glasgow. Get out of England and give Scotland some limelight. Besides, the other cities are not beautiful cities at all

mark dowd
mark dowd
1 month ago
Reply to  Jay

Liverpool’s waterfront, two Cathedrals..?! (And I’m a Mancunian.)

Paul
Paul
1 month ago
Reply to  Jay

You’d have to round up all the smack heads first if you went to Glasgow

Yass
Yass
1 month ago

Selfishly,I would like it to be Leeds since I live in London but I think Glasgow Manchester Liverpool have the most chance

Thallo
Thallo
1 month ago

London not making the shortlist upset me, alot. This is the 4th consecutive contest not held in the capital city, I hope this doesn’t become a running theme in the future. I know hosting in the capital is often more expensive and can be challenging due to the size and importance of these cities, but it’s worth it. I wanted a ‘Eurovision on steroids’ feel for 2023, and London could’ve brought that. The London Olympics were iconic simply because it was in London, the same would’ve applied for Eurovision. It’s a great shame, the effort and cost would’ve been worth… Read more »

Frisian esc
Frisian esc
1 month ago
Reply to  Thallo

I really don’t see how london would have made it iconic? Looking at football clubs british cities like manchester and liverpool are just as globally famous + the concert venues are of the same quality. You’d get maybe one opening shot of them zooming in on London city to the arena and that’s that.

Thallo
Thallo
1 month ago
Reply to  Frisian esc

Let’s be frank, if London hosted Eurovision they would make it as Londonian as possible. There wouldn’t just be one or two zoom shots, obviously. Think Paris hosting Eurovision, they would make it as Parisian as possible, which we actually saw with Junior Eurovision 2021.

Is Manchester as iconic as London? Is Manchester world-renowned for its culture and landmarks like London, Paris or Moscow? The honest answer is no.

Jonas
Jonas
1 month ago
Reply to  Thallo

Making it as Londonian as possible just means making the other parts of the UK feel even more left out… as usual.

Thallo
Thallo
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonas

If that’s the sole case as to why London shouldn’t host, then I understand. It’s nice that these other cities don’t feel left out anymore.

However… does this mean large countries like the UK, Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Turkey and Russia will have to do charity work and give the hosting rights to smaller cities so they ‘feel more included?’.

Azuro
Azuro
1 month ago

On people who say “nice to see different cities”

Birmingham and Yorkshire (where Leeds and Sheffield are) have both hosted the main contest more recently than London.

Darren
Darren
1 month ago

Kind of relieved it’s not Belfast to be honest.

Glad Manchester is still in the running though it’s my chosen city anyway.

It’s mad how we haven’t had a capital city host since 2018 though, like yeah it’s nice to see other cities and the UK has many capable host cities, but I really thought London would Atleast be shortlisted, given it’s iconic status

Jonas
Jonas
1 month ago
Reply to  Darren

Maybe this was Belfast’s best chance… 2023 wouldn’t be “the UK” hosting, more like the BBC hosting on behalf of Ukraine. Still, probably better not to pour oil on the already delicate problems up there.

Frisian esc
Frisian esc
1 month ago

How easy is it to leave manchester after midnight? Do you still have public transit like trains going to Liverpool? In that case i’m voting manchester to escape hotel price drama 🙂

Þórir
Þórir
1 month ago
Reply to  Frisian esc

They’ll probably put on extra services to other nearby cities for such a huge event

Azuro
Azuro
1 month ago

“A statement added that the process was “heavily weighted towards demonstrating past experience in hosting major international events, as well as being able to demonstrate their credentials in hosting a celebration of contemporary music”.

Are the BBC really saying Sheffield has more experience in hosting international events than London?

Lydia
Lydia
1 month ago
Reply to  Azuro

I think it’s more likely that London didn’t apply for some reason. This shortlist is based on those that applied that are able to host it, which would definitely include London if they had applied

Azaad
Azaad
1 month ago

So this will be the fourth consecutive contest not hosted in a capital.

Azuro
Azuro
1 month ago
Reply to  Azaad

And sadly Eurofans are cheering it along, just to be avant garde.

I can understand say Istanbul instead of Ankara, or if a Scottish artist won representing the UK holding it in Glasgow not Edinburgh.

But London is the flagship city. Sam Ryder is just from outside London. More than half of British Ukrainians and refugees live in London.

London has hosted the Olympics. But the BBC believe it doesn’t even make the top 7, but Sheffield does???

dygh
dygh
1 month ago
Reply to  Azuro

We don’t even know if London submitted their application.

Everybody knows London and lots of people make a trip to London at some point in their life. I think the BBC has to show something else.

Frisian esc
Frisian esc
1 month ago
Reply to  dygh

Amsterdam chose to not send in an application because they wanted to reduce the amount of tourists and were too busy. Could well be the same for london.

Eurotoxic
Eurotoxic
1 month ago

Why is not London on the list?

Azuro
Azuro
1 month ago

London doesn’t make the shortlist but Sheffield does? Will never understand the BBC.

Polegend Godnova
1 month ago

liverpool is the most iconic city in that shortlist so i voted that one

Nitzan
Nitzan
1 month ago

Birmingham was the last UK host, don’t they want to give other cities a chance?

Hello hi
Hello hi
1 month ago

Manchester has the best chance now . BBC headquarters etc . Second largest city with Birmingham. Plenty of hotel rooms and suitable venue

Henno
Henno
1 month ago
Reply to  Hello hi

The BBC HQ is London, Broadcasting House. BBC Media City is a production hub.

Darren
Darren
1 month ago
Reply to  Henno

BBC moved most of their production to Salford Docks, in Manchester a few years back.

Broadcasting House studio is only really used for News and the One Show now.

vetrina
vetrina
1 month ago
Reply to  Hello hi

Yes, but Man Arena is old and ugly af and the new Arena will be completed in December 2023.

Catriona
Catriona
1 month ago
Reply to  Hello hi

EBU have the final say, and they will want Glasgow. BBC’s anti-Scottish bias won’t mean anything here.

BimBamBoum
BimBamBoum
1 month ago

Did Netta make any prediction this year ? 😉

Heyey
Heyey
1 month ago
Reply to  BimBamBoum

She probably predicted London, which goes together with her previous predictions of the host city being the country’s capital (“Jerusalem 2019”, “Amsterdam 2020” etc.) 😀

lol
lol
1 month ago

they rlly should have shortlisted belfast

Dndndndjd
Dndndndjd
1 month ago
Reply to  lol

I agree it’s like the city that can relate the most to ukraine

Rifki
Rifki
1 month ago

I think, now, it’s pretty much a four-way battle between Birmingham, Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. the rest of those in the shortlist might not have enough hotel rooms or decent public transport system.
.
another thing is that I am a bit shocked that London even doesn’t make it to the shortlist.

Maybush
1 month ago
Reply to  Rifki

Leeds doesn’t have the public transport system but it is a compact city. The arena is right in the centre and is surrounded by hotels, bars restaurants etc. It has hosted the Tour de France grand depart and the arena has hosted sports personality of the year and MOBO awards. West Yorkshire has had a sizable Ukrainian community for decades. I think it has a decent chance for selection

CasperDiCaprio
CasperDiCaprio
1 month ago

Liverpool hands down plus it’s a designated unesco city of music

Whisker
Whisker
1 month ago

Glasgow please!

Kalla
Kalla
1 month ago

Come on birminghaaaaaam. We exceeded everyone’s expectations with the commonwealth games, I think we could host an amazing eurovision!

Thallo
Thallo
1 month ago
Reply to  Kalla

If anything, Birmingham had the honour of hosting the commonwealth games so Eurovision should go to a different city.

Catriona
Catriona
1 month ago
Reply to  Kalla

We hosted the best Commonwealth Games ever in 2014. So many top world events come to Glasgow far more often in Birmingham. Or any of the other cities. The way they specifically mentioned experience of hosting major events was required, that basically told me they’ve already picked Glasgow.

TomEurosong
TomEurosong
1 month ago
Reply to  Catriona

sorry but glasgow 2014 was not as good as birmingham 2022 and im not english

Luke A
Luke A
1 month ago

Come on Leeds/Newcastle 2023 would be amazing