Estonia Uku Suviste First Rehearsal Eurovision 2021
Photos: EBU / ANDRES PUTTING

On Wednesday evening Estonia’s ERR revealed that Eesti Laul 2022 is set for a revamp. And on Thursday morning the details became clearer as the broadcaster published the rules along with a start date for the new round of quarter-finals — 20 November.

Eesti Laul 2022 — Dates

As previously announced, the popular national selection is expanding to include quarter-finals involving 40 competing songs. The dates for these additional shows, as well as the traditional two semi-finals and final have now been published. All four preliminary heats will take place before Christmas, while the latter stages will take place as normal in the spring. Unlike recent years, there will not be a one weekend gap between the semi-finals and final.

  • Quarter-final 1 — Saturday 20 November
  • Quarter-final 2 — Saturday 27 November
  • Quarter-final 3 — Saturday 4 December
  • Quarter-final 4 — Saturday 11 December
  • Semi-final 1 — Thursday 3 February
  • Semi-final 2 — Saturday 5 February
  • Grand final — Saturday 12 February

The 40 quarter-finalists will be announced no later than 27 October.

Eesti Laul 2022: The rules

In addition to the competition dates, ERR has also released the rules. They include the following:

  • Songs can be submitted from 2 September. The submission window will close on 20 October at 12:00 local time.
  • 20 songs that will pass to quarter-finals will be in other languages and 20 songs will be in Estonian
  • The competition is open to authors and groups of authors who are citizens of Estonia, foreigners resident in Estonia or non-residents. However, the amount of non-resident writers on a song cannot outnumber Estonian citizens or residents.
  • Performers may also be citizens, residents or non-residents of Estonia.
  • Performers and authors can submit up to five songs.
  • Until October 17, the fee for participating €50 for a song in Estonian and €100 for a song in a foreign language or multilingual.
  • In the final phase of the competition, the participation fees will double to €100 and €200, respectively.
  • The competition song submitted to the competition must be the final version of the song.
  • 10 songs will compete in each quarter-final.
  • 20 of the initial 40 songs will qualify for the semi-finals.
  • 10 will progress to the final.
  • Organisers hope to have a live audience for the semi-finals and final.

The complete list of rules and regulations can be found here.

What do you think? Is 40 acts too much? Or is bigger better? Who would you like to see competing in Eesti Laul 2022? Tell us your thoughts below!

Read more Estonia Eurovision 2022 news here

 

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Colin
Colin
1 month ago

I am looking forward to seeing this selection. Not only because it will be easier to do so two months ahead of everyone else (although it is much appreciated), but also because last two ESC winners came from countries which had more great songs under their belt in the last decade. Both Italy’s and Netherlands’ win was a long overdue. After songs like La forza, Goodbye To Yesterday and more, it could be the same for Estonia. Purely general standard-wise, France, Ukraine, Norway, and Estonia are certainly on a preliminary watchlist for me.

Last edited 1 month ago by Colin
BadWoolfGirl
BadWoolfGirl
1 month ago

So the court files are gonna happen in late November through early December, and the main three shows won’t happen until February. I’d be ticked about the long space of time, but to be fair they probably will be other national finals filling up the time so that by the time Estonia is their national final, we’ve had our fill for other things.

Sabrina
Sabrina
1 month ago

I’m hoping for the best and I appreciate ERR’s enthusiasm, but 40 songs seem too much and, as much as I don’t like when everybody waits until March to release their entry, it’ll be hard to keep a song fresh from November (in case the future winner comes from one of the first semifinals) to May.

On the other hand, our fun will begin earlier this year.

Colin
Colin
1 month ago
Reply to  Sabrina

I agree that it could be an overload. 🙂 “it’ll be hard to keep a song fresh from November” IMHO, only “meh” songs age. I mean, Volare is fresh after over 50 years. If the song becomes boring till’ May, it was probably never meant to do well. 🙂 I don’t think that 40 would’ve been an issue if we voted online for the final 20 (like Latvia 2018), but 7 shows could be challenging for Estonia, considering the low quality of some of their previous semis. I mean, their 2020 semis actively ruined some performances with their poor equipment.… Read more »

Sabrina
Sabrina
1 month ago
Reply to  Colin

A good song won’t age, that’s for sure. But an average Eurovision entry will. And sometimes it happens very quickly… Let’s hope they have a few great songs in the mix. And that the supefinal won’t make it merely a popularity/sex appeal contest. They could take the opportunity to get rid of that final round of voting. I want want these 40 songs to be VERY diverse. Eesti Laul 2018 pops up in my mind. That final was one of the most diverse and entertaining we had recently. Too bad the next couple of years there were quite uneventful. 2021… Read more »

Colin
Colin
1 month ago
Reply to  Sabrina

Interestingly, for me there is about an equal amount of songs that age badly as those who turn out to be growers. Still, I cannot argue that certain trends pass quickly. 😉 I absolutely agree about the superfinals. Three best songs should end-up there. For me, singer’s charisma can sometimes amp-up a song, but it can only give a push to an already good song, not make-up for a bad one. And sex appeal is only vital in cases like Fuego or Sugar, when the song is *about that*. And even then, it’s only a cherry on the cake rather… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Colin
Sabrina
Sabrina
1 month ago
Reply to  Colin

Sex appeal is part of the game and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that, Maneskin and Eleni are good examples of it. Some good sex tension on the stage is also welcome, like Estonia showed with Stig and Elina. But in Eesti Laul it seems that a particular demographic is having a lot of weight in the final decision. Melfest had the same problem for a while, but things took a turn in the last few years.

Konopeletchky
Konopeletchky
1 month ago

This… Sounds very strange, specially considering they plan to bring 40 songs to compete even if they don’t know the songs’ quality. No national final has shortlisted as many songs as EF this year, the only one I remember is Latvia 2018, with around 63.

Plus that, adding more show to the format doesn’t change nothing if you don’t have good songs (i.e. Israel 2021, which shortened the selection they planned).

Alex
Alex
1 month ago

Festivali i Kenges has left the chat.

Chessguy99
1 month ago

It’s not surprising that a country who skipped their national final last year would want to do something bigger this year. It’s been two years since they last did it and you have to rev up the hype to get back the audience. I wonder if some of the other ones that skipped a year will be expanding their national final format.

Ashton
Ashton
1 month ago
Reply to  Chessguy99

??? what do you mean, they had Eesti Laul last year….

Chessguy99
1 month ago
Reply to  Ashton

My bad. They had the same guy with practically the same song as 2020. Sort of easy to forget the 2021 EL, couldn’t name any of the songs entered.

Last edited 1 month ago by Chessguy99
Colin
Colin
1 month ago
Reply to  Chessguy99

A lot of these songs were much better than the winning one (as noted by the juries too), but I do believe it was fair for Uku to go to Eurovision. He seems like a really nice guy, and his voice is indeed very good.

mad-professor
mad-professor
1 month ago
Reply to  Chessguy99

You couldn’t remember Jüri’s fantastic entry?

sri jayawardenapura kotte
sri jayawardenapura kotte
1 month ago

wow! Getting eurovision songs before jesc even starts!? cool

Darren
Darren
1 month ago

Just know that the song will be revealed in December but will spend the next 3-4 months being revamped into oblivion. Eesti Laul won’t count, it’s the revamped finished song that comes in spring that will . They’re basically looking for a performer and something that will sound like their eventual entry.

Whisker
Whisker
1 month ago
Reply to  Darren

That wouldn’t be fair, not to the EL songwriters, performers, public, other songwriters and performers.

Darren
Darren
1 month ago
Reply to  Whisker

Of course and I agree. But we could say the same about Israel and other countries that have national selections and then revamp the people’s choice.

Whisker
Whisker
1 month ago
Reply to  Darren

Sure thing!

Jofty
Jofty
1 month ago
Reply to  Darren

I agree too but without the multiple revamps, Israel might not have qualified. At least it was the same song (hello Belarus (? x 2) and Malta.

Denis
Denis
1 month ago

LOL, and people think Melodifestivalen has to many shows:)

just an esc fan
just an esc fan
1 month ago

i’ve heard the QFs won’t have live performances. in this case, the format lacks cuz many “fancy” videoclips can outshine the actual good songs and qualify instead.

Alvaro
Alvaro
1 month ago

Indeed the QFs will be based on the music videos 🙁 But also they could take online vote into account, but don’t know if they will.

Last edited 1 month ago by Alvaro
Ashton
Ashton
1 month ago

on the one hand, that’s so many songs and there will probably be many many filler songs. on the other hand, we get to hear possible eurovision songs in October, which is v exciting

X1D
X1D
1 month ago
Reply to  Ashton

I think they will be available the week before each quarter final just like Melfest and MGP.

ctx
ctx
1 month ago
Reply to  X1D

According to ERR deadlines you can not reveal your song until it is 12th of December, the day after last quarterfinal airs, therefore only possible option is that they reveal the songs before the shows, either some time before them or during the livestream. So yes, your theory is most likely correct