Official results released by the European Broadcasting Union reveal that for the second year running televoters and jury members agreed on the contest’s winner. But discrepancies in voting also show that Eurovision fans liked Germany’s Lena Meyer-Landrut a smidge more than the music professionals did.

Televoters awarded the “Satellite” singer first place with 243 points; they gave the second-place finishers from Turkey just 177. And while the jury also awarded Lena first place, they only handed her 187 points—just two more than their second favorite act from Belgium. Televoters and jury members both rated Britain’s Josh Dubovie last—a result, no doubt, of his lackluster performance and the pompous remarks made by his songwriter Peter Waterman. Here’s the complete breakdown for the final.

COMBINED TELEVOTE JURY
1 Germany 246 Germany 243 Germany 187
2 Turkey 170 Turkey 177 Belgium 185
3 Romania 162 Denmark 174 Romania 167
4 Denmark 149 Armenia 166 Georgia 160
5 Azerbaijan 145 Azerbaijan 161 Israel 134
6 Belgium 143 Romania 155 Ukraine 129
7 Armenia 141 Greece 152 Denmark 121
8 Greece 140 France 151 Turkey 119
9 Georgia 136 Georgia 127 Azerbaijan 116
10 Ukraine 108 Serbia 110 Armenia 116
11 Russia 90 Russia 107 Greece 110
12 France 82 Spain 106 Albania 97
13 Serbia 72 Ukraine 94 Portugal 69
14 Israel 71 Belgium 76 Bosnia 65
15 Spain 68 Iceland 40 Russia 63
16 Albania 62 Bosnia 35 Ireland 62
17 Bosnia 51 Albania 35 Norway 61
18 Portugal 43 Moldova 28 Cyprus 57
19 Iceland 41 Israel 27 Iceland 57
20 Norway 35 Portugal 24 Spain 43
21 Cyprus 27 Norway 18 Serbia 37
22 Moldova 27 Belarus 18 France 34
23 Ireland 25 Cyprus 16 Moldova 33
24 Belarus 18 Ireland 15 Belarus 22
25 U.K. 10 U.K. 7 U.K. 18


France's Jessy Matador

Until 2008, televoters had total control over who won. But the introduction of a jury has diluted televoting power and done much to shake up results. France’s Jessy Matador would have placed eighth this year if the contest were decided strictly by televoting. But the jury ranked him a disappointing 20th, so he finished 12th overall. That discrepancy of 14 places between televoters and jurors represented the biggest discrepancy in the final. On the flip side, Israel’s Harel Skaat benefited the most from the jury: they ranked him fifth, while televoters ranked him 19th. The following chart lists contestants in the order that the jury hurt them. A negative number represents a downgrade by the jury, zero represents no discrepancy, and a positive number represents a boost from the jury.

Country

France

Discrepancy

-14

Serbia -11
Spain -8
Armenia -6
Turkey -6
Moldova -5
Azerbaijan -4
Denmark -4
Greece -4
Iceland -4
Russia -4
Belarus -2
Germany 0
U.K. 0
Bosnia 2
Romania 3
Norway 4
Albania 5
Cyprus 5
Georgia 5
Portugal 7
Ukraine 7
Ireland 8
Belgium 12
Israel 14

FIRST SEMI-FINAL

Slovakia's Kristina

In the weeks leading up to Eurovision, bookies saw the first semi-final as a contest between Slovakia’s Kristina, Belgium’s Tom Dice and Greece’s Giorgos Alkaios. But as the complete results show, neither televoters nor jury members had much love for Kristina’s timid performance, ranking her 14th and 16th respectively. Televoters awarded Greece victory by a margin of two points over Iceland, and five points over Belgium. The jury begged to differ. It awarded guitar-strumming Tom Dice first place with a margin of 58 points. Proving they value musicality more than flash, they awarded second place to Portugal’s Filipa Azevedo. Her ability to sing in tune placed her eight points ahead of Greece (the ones with all the homoerotic thrusting and grunting).

As in the final, televoters and jury members both agreed on the last-place finisher. Aisha, the daughter of a Latvian pop star, proved that the apple can sometimes land very far from the tree. The lyrics to her entry “What For?” were simply excruciating: “I’ve asked my uncle Joe/ But he can’t speak/ Why does the wind still blow and blood still leaks?/ So many questions now with no reply/ What for do people live until they die?”

COMBINED TELEVOTING JURY
1 Belgium 167 Greece 151 Belgium 165
2 Greece 133 Iceland 149 Portugal 107
3 Iceland 123 Belgium 146 Greece 99
4 Portugal 89 Russia 92 Albania 96
5 Serbia 79 Serbia 92 Bosnia 86
6 Albania 76 Finland 69 Iceland 85
7 Russia 74 Albania 68 Malta 66
9 Belarus 59 Belarus 63 Serbia 65
8 Bosnia 59 Portugal 58 Estonia 64
10 Moldova 52 Moldova 54 Macedonia 62
11 Finland 49 Bosnia 42 Poland 58
12 Malta 45 Malta 40 Belarus 47
13 Poland 44 Poland 38 Moldova 42
14 Estonia 39 Slovakia 34 Russia 41
15 Macedonia 37 Macedonia 30 Finland 37
16 Slovakia 24 Estonia 22 Slovakia 25
17 Latvia 11 Latvia 12 Latvia 15

Again, the following chart indicates how the jury influenced the results. Russia’s Peter Nalitch, whose depressing ballad “Lost and Forgotten” proved popular among Prozac users, was hurt the most by the jury.

Russia -10
Finland -9
Iceland -4
Serbia -4
Belarus -3
Moldova -3
Greece -2
Slovakia -2
Latvia 0
Belgium 2
Poland 2
Albania 3
Macedonia 5
Malta 5
Bosnia 6
Portugal 6
Estonia 8

SECOND SEMI-FINAL

Georgia's Sofia Nizharadze

Bookies also misjudged how the second semi-final would play out. For months they had forecast that Azerbaijan’s Safura would pout her way to the top of the leader board, followed closely by Israel’s Harel Skaat, Armenia’s Eva Rivas and Denmark’s duo Chanée and Tomas N’evergreen (who, Wiwi might add, have no chemistry. She looked like she would rather hold hands with a serial killer when they were on stage in Oslo).

In the end, Safura won televoter hearts and minds: they ranked her first, seven points ahead of Turkey’s maNga. But jury members only placed her third, behind Georgia’s Sofia Nizharadze and Turkey. Wiwi suspects the professional producers ranked Sofia first because of her strong resemblance to British pop icon Cheryl Cole.

COMBINED TELEVOTING JURY
1 Turkey 118 Azerbaijan 126 Georgia 117
2 Azerbaijan 113 Turkey 119 Turkey 93
3 Georgia 106 Romania 113 Azerbaijan 89
4 Romania 104 Denmark 106 Israel 88
5 Denmark 101 Georgia 102 Armenia 84
6 Armenia 83 Armenia 90 Ireland 84
7 Ukraine 77 Ukraine 77 Denmark 83
8 Israel 71 Lithuania 65 Romania 80
9 Ireland 67 Sweden 64 Cyprus 79
10 Cyprus 67 Cyprus 53 Ukraine 78
11 Sweden 62 Netherlands 49 Sweden 76
12 Lithuania 44 Israel 46 Croatia 54
13 Croatia 33 Ireland 43 Lithuania 27
14 Netherlands 29 Croatia 22 Netherlands 26
15 Bulgaria 19 Bulgaria 15 Bulgaria 25
16 Slovenia 6 Slovenia 11 Switzerland 14
17 Switzerland 2 Switzerland 1 Slovenia 5

In terms of relative placement, Lithuanian funk band InCulto suffered the most at the hands of the jury. Under the old system, they would have placed eighth and advanced to the final. But their combined total left them in 12th, so they had to catch an early morning flight to Vilnius. Anna Bergendahl, the first Swedish contestant ever to be eliminated in the semi-final rounds of Eurovision, would also have advanced under the old system.

Lithuania -5
Romania -5
Denmark -3
Netherlands -3
Ukraine -3
Azerbaijan -2
Sweden -2
Slovenia -1
Bulgaria 0
Turkey 0
Armenia 1
Cyprus 1
Switzerland 1
Croatia 2
Georgia 4
Ireland 7
Israel 8
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