When Tel Aviv was announced as the host city of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019 hotel prices skyrocketed.

In some instances, rooms rose in price by over 1000%, as hotels anticipated an influx of 20,000 tourists to Tel Aviv during Eurovision fortnight.

Now that influx has failed to materialise, and as thousands of tickets remain unsold, hotels are dropping prices in response.

Israeli business outlet Globes reports that in one instance, Hotel Rothschild 22 has been forced to cut rooms prices for Eurovision weekend from a peak of 7400 NIS for a couple to just 3200 NIS. That’s a more than 50% drop since peak.

Hotel prices remain 20-30% above the seasonal average, but Globes suggests prices have fallen significantly since their peak in previous months.

With other large events scheduled in the city alongside Eurovision, price falls seem surprising.

Drop in demand for Tel Aviv flights, hotels and accommodation

Globes also reports that lower than average flight prices suggest demand for travel to Tel Aviv is low too.

Flights from a range of European destinations including Brussels, London and Barcelona can be found for as little as €300.

That’s in line with normal price for season, suggesting airlines have not been able to capitalise on high demand and raise prices.

The article also says over 10,000 AirBnbs remain available for short-term rents during Eurovision fortnight. In some cases rooms are available for as little as 400 NIS a night.

Are high ticket prices to blame?

As reported in the Israeli media, thousands of tickets remain on sale for this year’s Eurovision shows.

This is despite the fact that the arena is significantly smaller than in recent years.

KAN has responded to the article to point out that ticket sales are still ongoing:

“The sale of tickets to the Green Room, the semifinals, and the rehearsals is continuing. Tickets to the rehearsals and semifinals are relatively low, and this is an excellent opportunity for people to enjoy a show never before seen in Israel.”

What do you make of the news? Are you now considering a last minute trip to Tel Aviv? Let us know in the comments below!

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Photo Credit: Lonely Planet

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Martin
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Martin

Ticket prices were outrageous. But I am sure they will put on a good show. So watching from the couch is free and probably more enjoyable this year. Let’s home for Amsterdam next year

mamma mia
Guest
mamma mia

Flights for as little as 300€?! You can go to Shanghai for that price (from Paris or London)

Sam
Guest
Sam

I’ll let you on two secrets that even most Israelis are not fully aware of: First, if you fly with a low-cost or charter flight with a connection at any one of the following cities (Craiova, Timisoara, Iasi, Cluj or Sibiu in Romania, Varna in Bulgaria or Paphos in Cyprus , you can significantly reduce your total fare up to 50% than what you’d pay for a regular flight. One realizes the discomfort of making a layover at one of the cities mentioned above, but the price for the leg of the trip from those cities to Tel Aviv is… Read more »

Robyn Gallagher
Editor

Expensive hotels and tickets prices put attending Eurovision out of reach for many younger fans – students or those who don’t have a lot of disposible income. And I’m pretty sure the EBU doesn’t want Eurovision to be only for rich, middle-aged fans.

Martin
Guest
Martin

What about poor middle aged fans

Jordyn
Guest
Jordyn

At least you gave credit, but it seems unnecessary to post an article that’s basically straight-up lifted from another source.

Whisker
Guest
Whisker

What’s the problem with that? It’s not like Wiwibloggs have to contact hotels, hostels etc, airlines and such themselves. This is perfectly acceptable.

Currikitaum
Guest
Currikitaum

Well, what you described is what periodism is. Ripping off another source’s article is…not.

Nata
Guest
Nata

300 euro for a flight is very, very expensive.

Andy
Guest
Andy

I agree with those saying that ESC is probably for the locals and the hardcore fans. I also can’t see it significantly affecting the levels of tourist visits/spending drastically especially for popular destinations like Israel. Generally, there are so many factors affecting prices of tickets, accommodation etc. that is hard to find an exact relationship. Even for events of much bigger magnitude e.g. Olympics it takes years before we know the actual impact on each country’s tourism/economy.

Currikitaum
Guest
Currikitaum

Flight prices “as little as 300 euros”. That’s quite a lot of money, specially with overpriced tickets and overpriced rooms.

Paul
Guest
Paul

Yes!! It’s finally paid off being useless at booking things!!

Kris
Guest
Kris

Best reaction ever

Una
Guest
Una

About the hotel accommodation: basic market dynamics of supply and demand. Not surprised. Tel Aviv is served by many airlines and Eurovision is not as hot as important holidays. Not much incentive for people to pay high prices for either hotel or air transportation. I still believe that Eurovision is mainly for the locals and for hard-core fans that really want to go there. I still don’t see the impact on tourism. I’d be interested to know some tourism statistics for a few countries and its relation to Eurovision. There are many countries that don’t struggle with tourism and definitely… Read more »

Charles II
Guest
Charles II

I think you’re right. The media takes pictures of foreign flags, but really I don’t think there are thousands of people willing to spend so much money every year on what is a televised event after all.
The media inflates a balloon and then enjoys bursting it.

Una
Guest
Una

Yes!!!!! But I think some of those people come from fan clubs of some sort and have access to tickets close to the stage. And to be very honest, I would go to Montenegro for a holiday just because I think they showcast their country beautifully in their videos. This year and in another year – I don’t remember which year but it was pretty recent say in the past 5 years. Montenegro wouldn’t need to win the contest to make me go there – their videos are just enough for me personally to make me want spend some time… Read more »

Israeli
Guest
Israeli

It makes sense, since there are so few tickets available to purchase… There aren’t many spectators as expected. Plus many rent their appts for a few nights.

Alex
Guest
Alex

People would have bought the tickets if the prices were normal. Why would a tourist spend 1k in flight tickets + ESC tickets alone? It’s crazy!

Polegend Godgarina
Guest

milan-tel aviv from may 16 to may 20 is currently €175 return with easyjet

Charles II
Guest
Charles II

Flying to Israel and back is usually not that expensive.
There are a lot of low cost companies flying there.
Inter-European flights are often more expensive than flights to Israel. That’s also partially due to the Israeli government subsidies.
The issue in TLV are the hotel prices, which can be avoided by using airbnb.
Having said that, the Eurovision tickets are far too expensive for the regular person who just wants to see a show.

Alex
Guest
Alex

Airbnb is also very expensive, locals are renting their rooms/flats for high prices.

Alex
Guest
Alex

I don’t know what you’re talking about, most airnbn or couchsurfing places are unavailable during Eurovision in Tel Aviv. Hotels are expensive, even hostels!

Flights are for at least 300 euro which is expensive when you consider that you have to buy tickets starting at the price of 270 euro.

Una
Guest
Una

I’ve got it sorted out: fly in on Saturday even though I am not sure even airlines fly in during the Shabbat. But they do fly in, right? The world does not stop during Shabbat. Sleep on the plane, get some groove going at an open-air event, see the show, eat good food, get into the groove again. Fly out Sunday morning. Sleep on the plane back. Get home, see the show on youtube, get on wiwibloggs and post comments. 48 hours for myself. Sorted!!! This plan could work provided that I find a ticket within a certain price range… Read more »

Alex
Guest
Alex

That sounds like a horrible plan, you won’t get to see anything or feel the vibe.

Israel is a very interesting country and there’s more to see than Tel Aviv. Even staying in the city for the ESC week, it’s a waste of money as restaurants are expensive, accommodation is expensive (even hostels) and ESC tickets might cost you 1k for 3 shows.

Una
Guest
Una

But that’s not the point. Alex. It’s a wonderful plan. Point is to go enjoy Eurovision for 24 hours and limit the costs. Like going to a party, air fare notwithstanding, or the lack of sleep. I personally don’t care for seeing the show from the venue, nor the semis. The live shows I mean. I enjoy them more on TV.
I can go to Israel for holiday off season. I am sure that’s a lot to see. And to do. And enjoy. But not on the occasion of Eurovision – that would be outrageously expensive.