Sometimes Eurovision can feel dominated by English-language songs, but there are always plenty of songs performed in other languages. This year, 11 songs competed in the contest with lyrics other than English. But how did they do? Let’s take a look at the non-English songs that competed at Eurovision 2019.

Note: For this list, we’re including bilingual songs that had some English lyrics, as well as those sung entirely in a non-English language. However, we’re not including songs with predominantly English lyrics that include a few lines in another language, such as those from Norway, Croatia or Denmark.

11. Portugal: Conan Osíris – “Telemóveis”

Language: Portuguese
Place: 15th in the semi-final with 51 points

Portugal has never once given in to the temptation of sending a song with entirely English lyrics. Conan Osíris’s avant-garde “Telemóveis” was performed in Portuguese, with lyrics exploring mobile phones and the afterlife. Sadly, it wasn’t enough to get Portugal back in the grand final, finishing 15th in its semi.

10. Georgia: Oto Nemsadze – “Keep on Going”

Language: Georgian
Place: 14th in the semi-final with 62 points

For the second year in a row — and the second time ever — Georgia entered a song with lyrics entirely in Georgian. The stirring “Keep on Going”, along with the strong vocals of Oto and his backing singers, created a memorable performance, but unfortunately it placed 14th in its semi-final.

9. Hungary: Joci Pápai – “Az én apám”

Language: Hungarian
Place: 12th in the semi-final with 97 points

Hungary had enjoyed an eight-year qualification streak, and had made the final three times with songs performed entirely in Hungarian. Sadly this came to an end in 2019. While many appreciated “Az én apám” for its heartfelt emotion, it missed out on qualifying, placing 12th in its semi-final.

8. Poland: Tulia – “Fire of Love (Pali się)”

Language: Polish, English
Place: 11th in the semi-final with 120 points

“Fire of Love (Pali się)” was the first time that audiences heard Polish on the Eurovision stage since Donatan & Cleo in 2014. While Tulia’s song had an English intro and outro, it was predominantly sung in Polish. The rock meets folk song placed 11th in its semi, just three points away from qualifying.

7. Spain: Miki – “La Venda”

Language: Spanish
Place: 22nd in the grand final with 54 points

Spain kept with its general trend of songs with Spanish lyrics. The uplifting “La Venda” captivated televoters, ranking 14th. However, the jury was less convinced and overall Miki’s song placed 22nd in the grand final.

6. Serbia: Nevena Božović – “Kruna”

Language: Serbian
Place: 18th in the grand final with 89 points

The last time Nevena Božović represented Serbia at Eurovision was in 2013, when Moje 3 missed out on qualifying with”Ljubav je svuda”. It was better luck this time, however, as “Kruna” made it to the grand final, where it placed 18th.

5. Albania: Jonida Maliqi – “Ktheju tokës”

Language: Albanian
Place: 17th in the grand final with 90 points

Fans were relieved when, for the second year in a row, Albania did not “devamp” the Festivali i Këngës winner into a version with English lyrics. Jonida Maliqi delivered a strong vocal performance with the emotional message of “Ktheju tokës”. The song finished 17th in the grand final.

4. France: Bilal Hassani – “Roi”

Language: French, English
Place: 16th in the grand final with 105 points

“Roi” has the most amount of English in it, but the lyrics are predominantly in French. Bilal Hassini’s “Roi” tells a tale of self-empowerment, and its message resonated with viewers. The song placed 16th in the grand final.

3. Slovenia: Zala Kralj & Gašper Šantl – “Sebi”

Language: Slovene
Place: 15th in the grand final with 105 points

After having mixed results with English-language songs, Slovenia seem to have hit on a more successful formula. For the second year in a row, Slovenia reached the grand final singing in their own language. The intimate “Sebi” placed 15th, Slovenia’s third best result in the past decade.

2. Iceland: Hatari – “Hatrið mun sigra”

Language: Icelandic
Place: 10th in the grand final with 232 points

After languishing for four years in the semi-finals, Iceland finally broke the dry spell with an Icelandic language song. “Hatrið mun sigra” placed tenth in the grand final. Hatari gave Iceland its sixth best result ever, and its best result for the Icelandic language since 1992.

1. Italy: Mahmood – “Soldi”

Language: Italian
Place: 2nd in the grand final with 472 points

For the second year in a row, Italy is the country behind the most successful non-English entry. Mahmood’s Sanremo-winning “Soldi” is mostly sung in Italian, but also contains a couple of lines in Arabic, rarely heard at Eurovision. The close second-place finish of “Soldi” established this non-English song was one of the stand-out tracks of Eurovision 2019.

Poll results: What is your favourite non-English song of Eurovision 2019?

Earlier this year we asked wiwibloggs readers what was your favourite non-English song of Eurovision 2019. Echoing the contest results, your favourite was also Mahmood’s “Soldi”. The readers’ second favourite, however, was Conan Osíris with “Telemóveis”, a twist on his semi-final result.

  1. Italy: “Soldi” – Mahmood 20.37% (1,422 votes)
  2. Portugal: “Telemóveis” – Conan Osíris 12.89% (900 votes)
  3. Iceland: “Hatrið Mun Sigra” – Hatari 12.42% (867 votes)
  4. Albania: “Ktheju Tokës – Jonida Maliqi 11.23% (784 votes)
  5. Slovenia: “Sebi” – Zala Kralj & Gašper Šantl 10.43% (728 votes)
  6. Spain: “La Venda” – Miki 10.11% (706 votes)
  7. France: “Roi” – Bilal Hassani 6.75% (471 votes)
  8. Poland: “Fire of Love (Pali Się)” – Tulia 5.29% (369 votes)
  9. Serbia: “Kruna” – Nevena Božović 5.27% (368 votes)
  10. Hungary: “Az én Apám” – Joci Pápai 4.15% (290 votes)
  11. Georgia: “Keep on Going” – Oto Nemsadze 1.07% (75 votes)

What do you think? Should more countries enter non-English songs? Should the national language rule be reinstated? Share your thoughts in the comments section below!

Read more of our lists here

153 Comments
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gab
gab
1 year ago

Iceland is one of the most liked songs also.

Denis
Denis
1 year ago

People on here seem to go on and on about national language but they either have ignored or have forgotten that since televoting was introduced and national language rule was dropped that English language songs have been preferred by the voters too. Yes Salvador won but that’s also an exception. Even the televote winner this year was in English. The fact that only two winners were native language says a lot. Voters want native and national only if it’s something spectacular .

Lisa
Lisa
1 year ago

Soldi is an example of a wonderful non english song, and it was very close to win this esc: a song in Italian and arabic ! And Mahmood dared to sing not the usual ballads that Italians do very well (as the ballad of Ultimo in Sanremo festival) but an original and unique song.
Soldi is one of the most successful songs of this year and he’s, for many people, “the new Stromae”.
So it is possible to have success with a non english song but it has to be with exceptional quality, I think.

Jojo
Jojo
1 year ago

Juries really damaged Serbia. If just televote it would have got 11th, which is closer it should have ended up in my opinion.
They shouldn’t allow only 5 people to have 50% of a country’s votes – that is too much power and promotes corruption.

Hazzza
Hazzza
1 year ago

Albania this year was the best

demi
demi
1 year ago

hatrid mun sigra!

Polegend Godgarina
Polegend Godgarina
1 year ago

soldi being the commercial winner of this edition despite being in italian should ring a bell for other countries to send more modern, urban songs

pepe
pepe
1 year ago

How is Soldi the commercial winner?
There is barely any difference in chart success between Arcade and Soldi.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldi#Charts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arcade_(song)#Charts

pepe
pepe
1 year ago

Maybe you should have a look at Soldi’s and Arcade’s English wiki pages and examine the charts stats. Both songs have similar success in the charts.

Nguyet Huynh
Nguyet Huynh
1 year ago
Reply to  pepe

You should look more than just wiki pages. Not everyone is free enough to look up all the details and upload them on wikipedia.
There’re other charts releated to Itunes, spotify or apple musics as well.

Marteen
Marteen
1 year ago

UK could learn from them!

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago

The were only few non-english entries appreciated by the juries since 2009

– France 2009
– Italy 2011 (OK, partly sung in English…)
– Estonia 2012
– Albania 2012
– Spain 2012
– Portugal 2017
– Albania 2018
– Italy 2019

Please correct me, if I had forgotten something to mention

Kris
Kris
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

Australia 2016?

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Kris

No, I wrote “Non-english entries”

Loin dici
1 year ago
Reply to  Kris

I get the joke 🙂

Jo.
Jo.
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

2012 was LIT for non-English songs.

Oysters, clams and cockels
Oysters, clams and cockels
1 year ago

Juries not supporting non-english songs is a major crime and so outrageous. Let‘s get rid off all these pop radio, pop record label managers and former contestants on the panels. We need real experts or an amateur panel like before.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago

Another reason for claiming to reform rigorously the jury system ! I don´t wanna abolish them….

Hazzza
Hazzza
1 year ago

France has English in it and so does Serbia so why was Croatia not there and the best one is Albania

JelleTheWhale
JelleTheWhale
1 year ago
Reply to  Hazzza

The lyrics of Croatia are English for the most part, with only a couple lines in Croatian. France and Serbia are mostly in French and Serbian respectively, and only include a few English lines.

Hazzza
Hazzza
1 year ago
Reply to  JelleTheWhale

Yet it still has a minuet or so in Croatian I hate the song

Owen
Owen
1 year ago

It would be great to see more countries not singing in English. I would also love to see the UK enter a song in Welsh.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Owen

That would be great ! UK have nothing to loose anyway….

Sandrine Calme
Sandrine Calme
1 year ago

Too many good non-English songs to choose from. Italy is my favourite.

Anna
Anna
1 year ago

Soldi is having a lot of success everywhere -Israel Spain Lithuania Greece Sweden, aldo the Netherlands…
I don’t know if being in English it would have won, maybe yes; but it’s fantastic to see a catchy, deep, autobiographic Italian “marocco pop” song loved everywhere !

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Anna

Personally in my opinion “Soldi” is beside “Kuula”, “Kedveszem”, “Birds”, “Love injected” and “Amar pelos dois” one of the best entries in this ESC-Decade and four of them we´re not sung in English….

Sabrina
Sabrina
1 year ago

I was talking to Tibor and Colin on a different post about how the juries were harsh to non-English entries. And I believe Tibor summarized quite well in the comment here: the jury tend to rewards what’s mainstream, even about the language of the song. Which in my opinion reflects the lack of diversity on their composition. The audience, that would have an excuse to not go to songs in a language they can’t understand, is much more open to foreign languages than the music experts, that were supposed to put quality before anything else.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Sabrina

But they choose Salvador as their winner, but is was an exception…..

Sabrina
Sabrina
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

True. Let’s say the juries won’t stop a phenomenon to happen, but usually put songs that should be in the middle of the road in the end of the scoreboard and borderline qualifiers end up eliminated.

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Sabrina

Well, it’s perhaps a bit of an exaggeration to claim the public is _much_ more open to non-English language songs. I’d say, it’s _a little_ more open, but the televote winners are also English language songs – with the obvious exception of Italy, because they always send quality songs, and Iceland, because it was a very peculiar song that would have reached its audience in _any_ language. We’d have to check, but my gut feeling tells me, the only televote era didn’t treat non-English language songs better than our current combined vote era.

Sabrina
Sabrina
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

Yeah, we can drop the “much”. But I feel that the televote can embrace easier something that challenges them. When the logic would be for the juries to behave like that. Hatari was a perfect example of that. Also Conan, that did badly with both, but much worst with the juries.

Anita
Anita
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

In 2015 a non English song would have won with the televotes (Italy) but was downvoted by the juries.

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Anita

In 2015 we were indeed caught between a rock and a hard place … 😉

Nina
Nina
1 year ago

Germany needs to sing in German, They will blow everyone’s mind

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Nina

I absolutely agree with you !

blondboybc
blondboybc
1 year ago
Reply to  Nina

They seem to be very averse to their own language in the ESC…like they are scared to send something unique and genuine, rather than the generic anglo stuff they’ve been sending for years.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  blondboybc

With the exception of last year´s entry, although personally me prefer another musical styles for Germany to ESC.

Marteen
Marteen
1 year ago
Reply to  Nina

Woki no dem popo

startaglia7254
startaglia7254
1 year ago
Reply to  Marteen

That was Austria

Kris
Kris
1 year ago

Belarus is not included In list ? It was also in native language !! Gibberish with Russian accent?

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Kris

Belarus was the greatest crap of all this year…. Poland and Hungary deserved the final so much more !

Gin
Gin
1 year ago

I know winning is not everything, but consider this: 21 contests since language rule ended, and only 4 winners completely/partially in a non-english language.
How sad is that?

Kris
Kris
1 year ago
Reply to  Gin

Considering we have had 6-12 non English songs each year the past few years out of 37-43 , it seems like 4/21 is a proportional ratio

Roelof Meesters
Roelof Meesters
1 year ago

Some people say that countries ‘need to send songs in their native language,’ but what they don’t remember that some languages just aren’t as melodic as others- as a Dutchie I can say that our language just isn’t as nice to the ears- especially for someone in Moldova or Azerbaijan. But for the lovers of native languages JESC is a great place to discover more languages- even Irish and Azerbaijani!

Lisianthus
Lisianthus
1 year ago

True, you can also see it when looking at Belgium’s results before ’99. All top 3 results were sung in French. Most last place results were sung in Dutch.

blondboybc
blondboybc
1 year ago

If the song is melodic and catchy enough, who cares whether the language sounds “good” or not. It’s like you guys are allergic to singing in your own language or something. A shame, really.

Jo.
Jo.
1 year ago
Reply to  blondboybc

That’s true, the problem is not the language but how accessible the sound and the melody are to foreigners.

Jo.
Jo.
1 year ago

Edsilia finished 4th singing in Dutch and that was pretty good.

Meliris
Meliris
1 year ago
Reply to  Jo.

But on the other hand, there’s Sieneke…. (a very traumatic recent attempt)

stommie
stommie
1 year ago
Reply to  Jo.

The lyrics of “Hemel en Aarde” were specifically written to avoid any of the hard sounds like G and K.

Fatima
Fatima
1 year ago

Vrede is one of my favourite Dutch entries ever, but the English version, though well sung, has appalling lyrics about a giant mouse. Juries would not enjoy that. And I think Tikke-tikke-tak would have won just as well as Ding-a-dong

Adrianne
Adrianne
1 year ago

Would be fun if Ireland sang in Irish.
UK sang in Welsh

Azaad
Azaad
1 year ago
Reply to  Adrianne

Honestly Celtic languages are quite melodic. Considering Ireland’s last victory was with a very Celtic inspired song, this might work. At least you couldn’t accuse them of being generic.

blondboybc
blondboybc
1 year ago
Reply to  Azaad

Exactly!

Loin dici
1 year ago

I still believe the “jury not rewarding native songs” has something to do with Bjorkman, but generally, singing in native language can be a disadvantage in the name of accessibility. Well, 2020, bring me more native and disprove my theory.

INAMOO
INAMOO
1 year ago
Reply to  Loin dici

It’s sad because in relation to what you said, some countries would resort to having half-native language and half-English language in their songs hoping to score higher from the juries and televotes. At least it worked for some.

Riin
Riin
1 year ago

I don’t think sending a pop song in English is a safe way. They can be very underrated sometimes, like Bulgaria 2018 and Cyprus 2012 etcetc.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Riin

The worst example in this category is Spain 2016. For me personally was it absolute cheap and horrible to hear “my” Spaniards singing in English – fortunately it failed well, especially the televoters almost ignored it.

Germany ist a very particular case…..

Jo.
Jo.
1 year ago

The outcome is…more English next year, thanks to our “professional” juries.

Lisianthus
Lisianthus
1 year ago
Reply to  Jo.

Nope. Portugal, Georgia, Croatia, Italy, Iceland, Serbia, Albania, Spain and Slovenia all got more points from the televoters than from the juries. The only exceptions are Hungary and France.

bure
bure
1 year ago

Albania can go to h e ll with their screams, but Spain is a crime. And most of all… Italy. Enjoy your win Netherlands, but you must know Italy was better.

Kaiser
Kaiser
1 year ago
Reply to  bure

In Albania we say: Na rrufsh bolet.

Charles
Charles
1 year ago
Reply to  bure

And you need to get over yourself and surpass your depression … there is Eurovision in 2020 again … live life in the meantime …

Henry
Henry
1 year ago
Reply to  bure

If Italy was so much better than the Netherlands, why did it not win? It came 3rd in Televote and 4th with the Jury’s, so what are you talking about??

Lion76
Lion76
1 year ago
Reply to  Henry

It could have won, there were only 26 points left. And Netherlands also didn’t win neither the Televote nor the Jury’s vote.

pepe
pepe
1 year ago
Reply to  Lion76

Eurovision is decided by 50% jury vote and 50% tele vote. So the only thing that matters is who got most points in that combined vote.
And you can spin it as much as you want but Italy got less jury points and less tele vote points then the Netherlands.

Henry
Henry
1 year ago
Reply to  pepe

Exactly, that’s what i mean..

Lisa
Lisa
1 year ago
Reply to  pepe

Yes but also blogs like this or the bookmakers can have a part of responsability on influencing the votes …they placed italy as 6th or 7th the days before the final and put arcade as the announced and sure winner. Also duncan was annoyed by that! Without all this promotion for arcade I don’t know if the winner would be arcade or soldi.
Sincerely, without polemic

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Lisa

I like both Duncan and Mahmood, but I prefer the italian song more.

stommie
stommie
1 year ago
Reply to  Lisa

Yes it is all a big conspiracy against poor Italy.

Lisianthus
Lisianthus
1 year ago
Reply to  Lisa

Most viewers don’t even read any Eurovision fansites. They just vote for the songs they like best.

Lisianthus
Lisianthus
1 year ago
Reply to  Lion76

Duncan only lost the jury vote by 10 points, purely because the juries of Italy, Azerbaijan and Russia didn’t give him any points for strategic reasons.

Budwires
Budwires
1 year ago
Reply to  Lisianthus

Exactly

Jo.
Jo.
1 year ago
Reply to  Lisianthus

I wouldn’t say the Italian jury vote was strategical, it’s random every year. They gave 12 points to Barei , Dihaj, Rybak and now Leonora, not to mention they blanked Euphoria. It’s a disgrace.

Kredential
Kredential
1 year ago

Serbia, Albania and Poland were all ROBBED. Slovenia’s performance left me feeling a little cold but the song alone makes it deserving of a higher place. Ugh. In another year where the final isn’t as strong, these songs could have been contenders for top 10 spots.

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago

Singing in another language than English (or French in the olden days) has always been a disadvantage in Eurovision. That’s why more than half of the winners in the 90s are in English and the one that is from Norway practically has no lyrics. That’s why Denmark only won once in over forty years with the native language rule, but then twice with English songs after 2000 – with twice as much competition. It’s really tiresome to always hear and read this “perform in your native language” mantra, because if we look at the results that is not what the… Read more »

Bella
Bella
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

Over the last 20 years, 17 out of the 20 last places were also sung in English. If I follow your train of thoughts, that means that singing in English is also a great way to place last. You’re making a common statistical mistake which is you’re mixing up causality and correlation. English is correlated with winning because more songs in English participate: with 30 out of 40 songs in English, of course there’s a much higher chance that the winning song is in there. That doesn’t mean that it’s the English that makes it win… I don’t agree with… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Bella

Read my comment again: I am talking about the time when the national language rule was still in place, not about the last twenty years (exactly 20 years ago the national language rule has been abolished). Look at the results between the beginnings of the contest and 1999 and tell me that song quality has always been the deciding factor. How curious that in the brief period between 1973 and 1976 when the national language rule was suspended, out of nowhere Sweden had their first victory and in the following year, the Netherlands won for the first time since the… Read more »

Bella
Bella
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

I did read your comment, and I still don’t agree. The UK and Ireland only started cru shing this game in the 90s (with 5 wins and 5 runner up positions among these 2), and I do think that’s because they sent a bunch of great songs. Before that songs in French were actually a lot more popular: by the early 90s, 14 songs in French had won, 15 in another language and only… 9 in English (that’s only a 25% ratio). If what you say is right, why didn’t the golden age of English songs happen before that? Why… Read more »

stommie
stommie
1 year ago
Reply to  Bella

Because French chanson was very popular in the fifties and sixties. There was no such thing as English language pop music.

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Bella

Well, we witnessed a change in popular culture. During the 50s and 60s French chanson was popular and successful in non French speaking countries. French had similar advantages as English has today, but lost them over time. I have already alluded to that in in my first two comments. Yet, just look at the sheer number of French songs that were entered into the competition during the first decades of Eurovision. You had not only France, but Luxemburg, Switzerland, Belgium and Monaco that were all singing mostly in French – and in those days, they made up for nearly half… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Bella

I did answer you, but my comment got filtered.

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Bella

I guess, my comment won’t appear anytime soon, so I’ll try and type what I remember of it again: Like I said, in the beginnings, to have a song in French was also an asset, because French chanson was a thing in the European charts. Having said that, there were also much more countries that sent songs in French (Belgium, France, Luxemburg, Monaco, Switzerland) than in English (only UK and Ireland, in the 90s Malta, but in the 70s they actually sent songs in their native language – and came dead last twice). So even if you claim that the… Read more »

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

It´s not idle talk !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

Well, with all these exclamation marks you surely must be right …
It’s completely idle talk, because it is not backed up by results. You can wish for as many national language songs as you like, as long as they get stuck in the semis or on the right hand side of the scoreboard, fewer countries are going to send them, that’s just a fact. The delegations don’t cater to your personal wishes, but react to results.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

And what should do Ireland (except 2018) und UK ? They can´t blame their failures to the language….

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

They should send better songs.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

In my opinion THIS is the main reason for an eventual success at ESC: The quality at all and not the language !

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

Yeah, but that is not the topic.

Kosey
Kosey
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

Following your logic, which is well articulated, are you effectively saying that the UK, Ireland and Australia are currently disadvantaged because lots of countries sing in their language, and ergo, they lose some of their unique appeal? For example, if there were 15 Soldi-type songs sung in Italian in the competition, would Mahmood have done as well as he did? I often think the native English-speaking countries get a bad press partly because English is saturating the competition. English is not the language of the world, it is the language of the English (and English speaking countries) – is there… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Kosey

Your question covers a lot of aspects, so I’m only going to respond to the core one, the question if the national language rule is fair. In my opinion it isn’t. Yes, English is obviously the native language of the English speaking countries, but it is also the lingua franca of the world. It dominates pop culture and the charts around the globe, even in countries, where native language songs are playing a bigger role in the music markets (like France or Italy). That’s only true for English, nowadays, and it gives entries in English an advantage: Absolutely everybody knows… Read more »

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

No, in France, Italy and Spain the native language dominates.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

And what was the reason for Salvador`s victory two years ago?

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

How should I know, he got the most points, probably . And when did I ever say that a song that is not in English cannot win?

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

Just look at their charts, they’re online. You’re talking nonsense.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

No, I don´t. In the spanish charts the highest rank for an english song is actually #11. In the Top 10 are only songs in Spanish and surprisingly “Soldi”.

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

You were the only one talking about Spain. Read my comments, before you reply to them. Context is everything.
And for the record, I said that I’m talking about markets, in which the native language plays a bigger role. That doesn’t change my point, that in these markets the only heavily present foreign language is English. The Spanish charts being full of Spanish songs does not help a song in Danish or Polish.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

These all are not convincing me, sorry….

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

I would have been shocked if they were …

Kosey
Kosey
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

I understand where you are coming from, but I would caution comparing North Macedonia to Serbia. With the former, it was clearly a “message” song – ie, women’s empowerment. Those type of songs always do well in Eurovision, regardless of language, and as I understand the Serbian song, it did not have the same message. There were plenty of English-language ballads which did awfully – see Moldova, UK, Montenegro, Germany. I really don’t believe language is as important as you state. Also, you didn’t address my comment that it is unfair to English-speaking countries having other countries sing in English,… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Kosey

Yes, Kosey, but the question is not, who did badly. As I said, if two thirds of the songs are sung in English, not every single one of them is going to do great, that’s just a given. And that’s why I was initially looking at the time pre-1999, because when the national language rule was still in place, you could actually see its effects. Today it is more difficult. That brings me to my second point: If you want to believe, that the message of the Macedonian song can be the explanation for a 200-point-gap, I cannot prove the… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Kosey

I answered but got filtered again. It’s really difficult to have a conversation in this comments’ section, sorry.

Jojo
Jojo
1 year ago
Reply to  Kosey

Well Serbia sent a “women’s empowerment” song in English in 2016, with Sanja Vucic’s “Goodbye” about leaving an abusive relationship and striking out on one’s own, yet it only got 18th place.
The fact is ‘North’ Macedonia was rewarded for its name change – which the majority of Macedonians did not want. It was forced through by a puppet government.
Eurovision was used politically to boost Macedonian’s new name of North Macedonia.

startaglia7254
startaglia7254
1 year ago
Reply to  Jojo

This.

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Kosey

Same here, I’ll try to type a quick answer, since my comments seem to have been permanently swallowed. I was referring in my original post to the period before 1999 for a reason: In these years, the national language rule was mostly in place, so you can actually see, which languages did best: French and English. Nowadays, you have, of course, a lot of English language songs, that logically cannot all be successful at the same time. So it doesn’t really make sense to me to look at the number of English songs that _didn’t_ win over the last two… Read more »

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Kosey

Same here, I’ll try to type a quick answer, since my comments seem to have been permanently swallowed. I was referring in my original post to the period before 1999 for a reason: In these years, the national language rule was mostly in place, so you can actually see, which languages did best: French and English. Nowadays, you have, of course, a lot of English language songs, that logically cannot all be successful at the same time. So it doesn’t really make sense to me to look at the number of English songs that _didn’t_ win over the last two… Read more »

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

Otherwise there are a lot of countries gonna fail every year with songs in English….

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

Of course there are. If two thirds of the songs are in English, not all of them are going to win, that’s just arithmetics. And absolutely nobody claimed, that having a song in English is a guarantee for success, that’s just a silly way of distorting my words.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Tibor

Sometimes could a song jn native language so much better but the responsable persons do not dare.

Moreover: The ESC have nothing to do with the habitual pop culture.

Tibor
Tibor
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

Whatever. I will not respond to your comments anymore if you don’t at least try to make some sort of argument.

Michelle
Michelle
1 year ago

I know Noway’s was predominantly in English but the small part in the native tongue must have helped them win the televote?

Alex
Alex
1 year ago
Reply to  Michelle

Norway had an amazing live arena performance and yes Fred’s part was very strong . That moment with Fred joiking and the fire was very effective and memorable.

Jjjjjj
Jjjjjj
1 year ago

Actually, Hungary qualified 4 times singing entirely in Hungarian, in 2005, 2013, 2017 and 2018

Serhat Forever
Serhat Forever
1 year ago

I will always be a Serhat fan. You can enjoy your beloved f a r t s.

Charles
Charles
1 year ago
Reply to  Serhat Forever

Non talented singers do also have their own fans … I mean if Britney Spears has had hers for 20 years … so can a dentist …

Kosey
Kosey
1 year ago

As a native English speaker, I do wonder why so many artists choose to sing their song in English. I suppose it is to make the song as accessible as possible, but two of my favourites this year were Italy and Iceland, so I really don’t think language matters, it is the quality and emotion in the song that counts. Plus, if you are not a native English speaker and try to write in English, you run the risk of getting the meaning wrong or it being misinterpreted. A few examples: “I’ll swallow hard” – doesn’t get across what Sergei… Read more »

Justice
Justice
1 year ago
Reply to  Kosey

Strangely enough, the swallowing hard thing comes from a native speaking songwriter. I mean, Croatia and Lithuania as well, in part. Rather sad, actually.

Kosey
Kosey
1 year ago
Reply to  Justice

That’s interesting, I didn’t realise native English speaking writers were involved as well. I guess this proves that writing is a tricky business, so perhaps more reason to stick with what you know best?

Ziv
Ziv
1 year ago
Reply to  Kosey

Sometimes the English lyrics confuse me grammatically. Like why “when she go low, she go so low” rather than “goes”? Flashing back to two years ago, why “it don’t come easy” instead of”it doesn’t come easy”? It is not what the teachers teach in kindergarten.

Kosey
Kosey
1 year ago
Reply to  Ziv

And the obvious confusion with “solo” in that song brings a wonderful, alternative meaning to that song.

The Victorian in me would say, “well, they are not singing English anyway!”

Loin dici
1 year ago
Reply to  Ziv

It’s a compromise to make it sound better. Singing those lines with gramatically correct words can ‘grate your ears’, according to these songwriters.

Lisianthus
Lisianthus
1 year ago
Reply to  Kosey

Duncan wouldn’t have won if he had sung in Dutch. People call Dutch an ugly language.
That is also why the language rule shouldn’t be reinstated. Countries that speak languages that are considered ugly are at a clear disadvantage in that case.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  Lisianthus

I like the dutch language, but I have to confess that “Arcade” certainly sounds better in English.

James
James
1 year ago

Quite interesting that we have a full row of non-English song qualifiers placing 15th to 18th back to back.

ESCFan2009
ESCFan2009
1 year ago

“Should the national language rule be reinstated?” Uhm, should I shock y’all?
I thought about all National Finals being presented – not the songs! just the moderation! – in English, due to respect for the foreign fans. Watching things like Eesti Laul without understanding a word is no fun at all, whereas Australia Decides was a pleasure for my ears and my brain 😀

Justice
Justice
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

The NFs are there for the locals to decide THEIR country’s representative, not for you to have every single word explained to you. I hope the nation of Estonia will continue to disrespect the hell out of you.

ESCFan2009
ESCFan2009
1 year ago
Reply to  Justice

I thought that this reaction would happen ofc, but let me say 1 thing: Estonia was just an example. I would also insist that MY National Final in Germany is presented in English, so that YOU can understand the show. Isn’t that kind of me? 🙂

Justice
Justice
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

German is my mother tongue and it would not be kind if I had to endure someone blabbering in English with an awful German accent for two hours, unless it’s Barbara Schöneberger.
And yes, of course that reaction was going to happen. If not from me, it would have come from literally anyone else who is sane on here.

ESCFan2009
ESCFan2009
1 year ago
Reply to  Justice

“Who is sane on here” 😀 LOL. Well, sometimes you just have to think about things and spinnin’ around a bit 😀 National Finals are becoming international events and I wouldn’t mind a bit of “Welcome Eurovision fans from all over the world to our National Final, let’s celebrate music together” 😀

James
James
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

Knowing full well those fans are likely to watch their shows through pirated means. How often do most lift the geoblock on their respective livestreams?

ESCFan2009
ESCFan2009
1 year ago
Reply to  James

Agree, @James, that would be the next problem we have to solve. It is insane that Eurovision National Finals are not open to watch for the whole world. I mean from what I read here, Americans even have problems to watch Eurovision itself. This cannot be the case in 21st century in a contest of bringing people together…

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

For me it´s not insane. The national finals are at first for the public at home…. You can exagerate the crazyness about English language.

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

Please say this to Portugal, Spain, France and Italy …

It will be never happen ! It´s better to broadcast with subtitles, just like in Finland during every performance at ESC. Where´s the problem for you ?

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

Dream on, boy, dream on….

Ziv
Ziv
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

Will the Italians stage a riot if Sanremo is won by an English song?

James
James
1 year ago
Reply to  Ziv

The Italian music industry doesn’t seem like the type that depends solely on monolingual English songs to sell records, and it shows on Sanremo.

Anna
Anna
1 year ago
Reply to  Ziv

In sanremo songs have to be in Italian….

ESCFan2009
ESCFan2009
1 year ago
Reply to  Ziv

For me “Celebrate Diversity” would also mean, seeing an Italian artist singing in English one year, then an Italian entry, the 3rd year sth bilingual, etc. (I know my concepts are very open-minded and international and it annoys some people… Sometimes I’m too philosophic ^^)

Ziv
Ziv
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

In fact, I am not against the idea of countries selecting English songs. If all countries send songs in their native languages, how could I enjoy singing along? I would only be able to sing UK and Australian songs! (well, maybe a bit Italian) Singing the songs is a part of enjoyment in Eurovision. Plus, we would not have heard Loin d’ici and La Forza if Austria and Estonia had to send German and Estonian songs. Having said that, I started learning Italian two years ago partly because of Occidentali’s Karma, and being able to watch Sanremo and understand a… Read more »

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

What´s your opinion about a song in German, Swedish or Azeri (Never or long time not happened anymore at ESC) ? Or song for UK in Welsh ? This I call DIVERSITY, too. Europa have so many languages and this sounds very interesting.

ESCFan2009
ESCFan2009
1 year ago
Reply to  Mr X

@Mr X: My opinion about a song in German? Roger Cicero was amazing in 2007! <3

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

No, a song in German for the future….

Mr X
Mr X
1 year ago
Reply to  ESCFan2009

Yes, the national language rule should be reinstated !

Meliris
Meliris
1 year ago

All of these except Italy were severely underrated by juries.

Dumbo
Dumbo
1 year ago
Reply to  Meliris

Agree but Italy could be placed even higher by juries (

Meliris
Meliris
1 year ago
Reply to  Dumbo

that’s why I said severely, Italy was still underrated but not as badly as the others.

Sinama
Sinama
1 year ago
Reply to  Meliris

Italy could’ve won, if the juries would’ve respect it more. North-Macedonia and Sweden over Italy, really juries?

Lisianthus
Lisianthus
1 year ago
Reply to  Sinama

The same is true for the Netherlands. Arcade and Soldi were both clearly better than Proud and Too Late For Love.

Kris
Kris
1 year ago
Reply to  Meliris

Every freaking year Malta is overrated by Juries , the one year they actually send a current, quality song they are like ohk let’s give you 75 points

Jo.
Jo.
1 year ago
Reply to  Meliris

Italy did better with the public, and the juries tried to save Hungary.

Tom
Tom
1 year ago
Reply to  Jo.

Hungary was losted even before ESC