Spain is calling, and this time the call comes from one of Spain’s most try-hard Eurovision artists Rebeca Pous. Good news for everyone who is thirsty for euro-drama: this call is juicy and dripping with the hottest Spanish tea. That’s , honey.

In a recent interview with Formula TV — Spain’s leading site devoted to television — Rebeca claimed that if things repeatedly don’t work out for Spain at Eurovision, then you should listen to the fans who, in her mind, understand what’s going on a bit better than those in charge.

Rebeca has tried to represent Spain at Eurovision not once, not twice, not three times, but four times, matching the much-loved Mirela (who finished second in her last participation to represent the Iberian Nation and who found herself in one of the biggest dramas and punch-ups in Spain’s recent Eurovision history). Rebeca made her attempts in 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010. In 2007, she actually co-wrote the song for D’Nash, who went to the contest. Now grab your napkins, because it’s time to spill all the hot beverages in this house.

D’NASH’s “I Love You Mi Vida’ was meant for Rebeca?

“I Love You My Vida” — the entry that D’Nash performed in Helsinki — could have had another fate. Rebeca wrote the song together with Tony Sánchez-Ohlsson and apparently it was written with her voice in mind. As Rebeca tells Formula TV, “Thomas G:Son invited us to his home in Stockholm as he wanted to record his song with me“.

According to Rebeca, the song also sounded better recorded with a female voice and it really showcased her passion. She also revealed that the original ideas for staging for D’NASH had to be parked. They were apparently more interesting and ambitious, but couldn’t be seen through to completion.

Rebeca’s participation in Spain’s 2007 selection process — Misión Eurovision — got her all the way to the semi-final with her song “Que no daría yo”. Her 10th place finish was not enough to move forward. She was left behind as Mirela and D’NASH, along with four other hopefuls, advanced. She did, however, manage to fly to Helsinki along with D’NASH as part of the team that co-wrote the song. She described it as “the most exciting thing I’ve experienced in my life.”

Acknowledging that Spain has placed in the Bottom 5 four years in a row, and in a position less than 20th five times running, Rebeca tells Formula TV that it’s not really the singer that’s the issue. “It’s not really whether the Spanish representatives are better or worse, but it’s that the song doesn’t reflect Europe’s taste.”

“Not all high positions have to last forever, and if things don’t work out and results don’t come together, one has to listen to the fans, and those who understand.”

Yes, girl wants RTVE to hand out some pink slips. She adds that while she likes Toñi Prieto — RTVE’s Entertainment Director — she’s also scared of her. Speaking humorously, she says she thinks Toni has condemned her for remarks she made in the aftermath of Objetivo Eurovision 2017 — remembered as one of Spain’s most explosive euro-dramas.

From RTVE to the Spanish Parliament, the heat of Objetivo Eurovision spread across the country. Rebeca let her feelings be known at the time. As she admits, “I jumped all in when Objetivo Eurovision happened, and I don’t regret it.” At the time, Rebeca called the event an absolute shame, while claiming it was not the only Spanish Eurovision process where there had been alleged fraud. She added Misión Eurovision 2007 to the list. “Things were way too fishy, and I think we’ve  had it up to now.”

From 2007 to 2017 to today — her relationship with Toñi Prieto has hit the level of tension where Toñi actively reproaches Rebeca’s new attempts to represent Spain. She claims that Toñi once replied to one of her submissions by saying, “Again? Don’t you get tired of taking your chances?”

As with so many artists, Rebeca thinks she no longer has a chance with RTVE — but she does know how to write a hit. She points out that Blas Cantó is now looking for a hit, so perhaps Rebeca could have another chance at hitting Eurovision.

Does Spain need to change its approach to reach those high positions again? And what do you think of Rebeca’s tea? Please, let us know in the comment section below!

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Moonstar
Moonstar
3 months ago

“I love you mi vida” is bad. Nothing could have saved it. Even the title is cringey!

NOOO
NOOO
3 months ago

I mean her version really sounds better than D’NASH https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1Dw601sMeA

Alex
Alex
3 months ago

I agree that it’s not about the artist but song and expectations EUROPE has from Spain. Spain has so many talented artists but they fail with staging (e.g. 2009, 2015, 2018, 2019) while in other cases the song was forgettable (2013, 2016). I think Spain should take note of what’s out there and fully support their entry with a good staging. Miki was lovely and he had a great fun song but they messed up the revamp and the staging was over the top without purpose. Sometimes, a simple yet effective staging works (see Germany 2010). I think they should… Read more »

Mr Vanilla Bean
Mr Vanilla Bean
3 months ago

It was not a special song, in my opinion, regardless of male or female voices. Mirela had a G:sson ballad I really liked in 2009, but it was clear that the broadcaster didn’t like her. And to lay all doubts to rest, they made that obvious in 2017. In any attempt she made, Mirela would have been a better option than what Spain sent to Eurovision. Unfortunately, it’s not only a Spanish phenomenon. Numerous broadcasters blatantly boycotted public favorites, even potential contenders.

Héctor
Héctor
3 months ago

Thankfully the so-so divas with cheesy schlager-y songs and tacky performances era is long gone. This type of songs and artists had already no place outside the Eurovision bubble back then. You can’t compare those dark years with what artists are sending now (in general).

It’s funny how every now and then these failed artists spill the tea about Eurovision like they now what we have to send although all of them have meet any success at all in music.

Una
Una
3 months ago

So I don’t know about Spain’s efforts but unlike other Big5 countries it looks like they are not trying at all. I think they are afraid they might win and organizing the contest would be a big risk politically. And that their worries are not justified. Or just sheer incompentence. Getting bottom 5 or last place so many times is a huge red flag.
To add, they were *the* candidate for the bottom last once again. No os perdono, Espana.

Colin
Colin
3 months ago
Reply to  Una

I did love Spanish songs in 2010, 2012, 2015, 2018 and 2019, but in several occasions they have been the weak link in otherwise good Big 4/5 years. 2009 comes to mind. Also 2011. In the context, Sognu, I Can, and especially Taken by a Stranger and Madness of Love were all Top 20 materials. Spain, on the other hand… And then there’s Do It For Your Lover… 🙁
This year, I’d assess France as weaker than Spain, but still, Germany, UK and especially Italy are much better!

Last edited 3 months ago by Colin
Una
Una
3 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Re: Espain I liked Pastora’s song from all of Spain’s entries post-2000. And maybe slightly their 2013 song (Morpheus’ dream or something like that) but that was performed terribly and messily and off-tune. Possibly the worst live rendition in Eurovision that I can think of. The studio version seemed promising. If I think better, I liked the 2011 entry too with the exception of the dancers. It looked like Spain was stuck in the 1990s. Spain would never qualify from the semis. What’s wrong with them? Now this year France could have ranked above Spain and not for the quality… Read more »

Una
Una
3 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Colin, I answered you but the comment went into moderation. In brief, I liked Spain 2011, 2012 and slightly the studio version of 2013. I don’t know what is happening to them. Why don’t they get better results?
I think France would have ranked above Spain this year because the French singer was much better looking and charismatic. Still, I think Spain had a more interesting song.

xelx
xelx
3 months ago
Reply to  Colin

Blas’ resultant entry was most probably not very competitive, but the project and its approach was not less professional, for once.

Alex
Alex
3 months ago
Reply to  Una

I think they are kinda trying but not enough. They need someone who is dedicated to the Eurovision project and bring success. See CZ/FR and how they changed the fate of their countries. Also, Netherlands.

Una
Una
3 months ago
Reply to  Alex

Yes, Alex! All of this! I want all countries to do well. But they need to want that too. Czechia, France, the Netherlands. Even San Marino!! To rank lower than countries that come into the GF from the semis looks very bad.

Una
Una
3 months ago

OMG she just needs exposure and all for the wrong reasons. That tea is not tasty at all. Does she want to present herself as a serious and trustworthy artist or not? Don’t know about her talent and all this tea does not make me curious in the slightest.

I was suprised to see Tomasito’s name involved with Espain more than 10 years ago. He did manage to get on the *big stage* in 2012. But try in 2007?

Joe
Joe
3 months ago

I mean…she’s not wrong. Spain’s delegation can talk a big game about working in the best interest of the fans, but the proof is in the pudding, and there hasn’t been much pudding.

Xyz
Xyz
3 months ago

Yes sis tell them… 13 years later ?

Pedro
Pedro
3 months ago
Reply to  Xyz

She continuously said it out, back in the 00’s. It’s now that FormulaTV site interviews past Spanish NF artists that made themselves a name out of the ESC bubble, and still are not so known enough for the general public in Spain.
Since the boom of OT, there are a lot of interviewed artists that were so out of the spotlight during ESC, having their good and bad words about RTVE’s ESC management. Nothing so new.
Gotta say, Rebeca was the “biggest” Spanish candidate, way before Mirela or Coral came in.