Iceland Dadi First Rehearsal Eurovision 2021

Eurovision fans in Iceland will have to wait one more week to discover who will be representing their country in Turin. Broadcaster RÚV has confirmed that the dates of Söngvakeppnin 2022 have been postponed by one week due to concerns around the Covid-19 pandemic.

While the Icelandic national final was due to begin on 19 February, the dates of the shows have been delayed by one week. The first semi-final will now be held on 26 February, semi-two on 5 March and the grand final will be held on 12 March.

Söngvakeppnin boss Rúnar Freyr Gíslason has said organisers would have liked to postpone the contest even further, however the EBU’s deadline for all broadcasters to submit their Eurovision entries is 13 March — so there’s no room to move.

Gíslason acknowledged the disruption the date chance will cause. He said, “Of course, this is not an easy decision, we realise that this affects a lot of people, employees and competitors.”

The extra week gives more time for people to continue getting vaccinated. Gíslason explained that health measures were important, saying “We follow the strictest requirements for infection control during rehearsals and broadcasts these days to reduce the risk of infection and their spread.”

The broadcaster hopes that with the extra preparation time, the three Söngvakeppnin shows will be able to go ahead with the usual live audience.

Gíslason was cautiously optimistic, saying “As everyone knows, there is no room for complacency in these matters, but we hope for the best. In this situation, of course, anything can happen, but we are moving forward unscathed and we are actually going to bring this people the joy bomb that is this competition.”

Söngvakeppnin entries will be revealed on 5 February

RÚV has confirmed that ten songs have been selected to compete in Söngvakeppnin 2022. The artists have already submitted recording of the songs and rehearsals for the semi-final performances have already begin.

The competing acts will be revealed on 5 February. The songs, songwriters and the performers will be introduced on an RÚV presentation named Lögin í Söngvakeppninn. Soon after, the songs will be released.

Last year, RÚV took a break from using Söngvakeppnin and internally selected 2020 winner Daði og Gagnamagnið. The colourful act represented Iceland in Rotterdam and came fourth with the song “10 Years” — despite the group competing with rehearsal footage after a Covid diagnosis required the Icelandic delegation to be quarantined at their hotel.

What do you think? Who would you like to see compete at Söngvakeppnin 2022? What sort of act should Iceland send to Turin? Sound off in the comments section below!

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eurofan
eurofan
4 months ago

Am I missing something here ??
Iceland has extremely low cases and virtually no deaths or serious illness. Their population of 350,000 approx. have been vaccinated.
Here in the UK, there have been tens of millions who have all three jabs.
This seems like caution to ridiculous levels.

ete sech
ete sech
4 months ago
Reply to  eurofan

I agree with you, the hypochondria is too high

Jacob
Jacob
4 months ago

I would love to see Aron Hannes back. I really enjoyed his “Tonight” in 2017.

Jack Popfield
Jack Popfield
4 months ago

February 5th:

• Songvakeppnin entries released
• Melodifestivalen 1st semifinal
• Sanremo final

Plus plenty of other shows in national selections, should be the first of 6 highly exciting Saturday nights ahead of NF season!

esc2022turin
esc2022turin
4 months ago
Reply to  Jack Popfield

February 19th:
Dora 2022 final
MESC2022 final
MGP2022 final
Polish nf final
San Marineese nf final

Kåre Eriksen
Kåre Eriksen
4 months ago

Don’t they already have one of the highest vaccination rates worldwide?

lisa thompson
lisa thompson
4 months ago
Reply to  Kåre Eriksen

LOL

esc2022turin
esc2022turin
4 months ago
Reply to  Kåre Eriksen

Yeah, but the Omicron variant can still infect despite the vaccination (The good news is that it’s milder than other variants)